Insurrection At The Capitol: Live Updates Shockwaves after pro-Trump rioters stormed the U.S. Capitol complex

Insurrection At The Capitol: Live Updates

Shockwaves after pro-Trump rioters stormed the U.S. Capitol complex

Facebook Oversight Board Co-Chair On Determining The Future Of Trump's Accounts

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Facebook's oversight board is considering what to do about Donald Trump's accounts. Jeff Chiu/AP hide caption

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Facebook's oversight board is considering what to do about Donald Trump's accounts.

Jeff Chiu/AP

An independent oversight board for Facebook is now determining if Donald Trump will be allowed to return to the company's social media platforms after Facebook indefinitely suspended Trump's accounts following the Jan. 6 insurrection.

Facebook referred the decision to the board on Thursday, which Facebook says can make binding decisions that not even CEO Mark Zuckerberg can overturn.

Currently, the board consists of 20 members, co-chair Jamal Greene told NPR's All Things Considered, who will break into panels to determine whether the suspension was appropriate and consistent with the company's policies and values. Greene is also a law professor at Columbia Law School.

"We draw on both the company's own terms of service, which they refer to as their community standards, and whether they were properly applied, but also Facebook has what are called values," Greene tells NPR. "Voice is one of those values. Safety is one of those values. Dignity is one of those values. And we are also charged with applying those values."

In weighing the suspension of the former president's accounts on both Facebook and Instagram — which the company also owns — the board would also consider, Greene said, international rights law "that has standards for when and how freedom of expression can be regulated."

"Facebook has committed to acting consistent with those standards, and so the board is set up to try to apply those international human rights norms to the behavior of the company," Greene added.

Facebook put the indefinite suspension on Trump's accounts following an initial 24-hour block shortly after the insurrection. In announcing the minimum two-week indefinite suspension on Jan. 7, Zuckerberg said the "risks" of continuing to allow Trump access to the company's platforms were "simply too great."

The next day, Twitter said it was permanently banning Trump's account.

Earlier this week, Facebook's vice president for global affairs and communications defended the suspension to NPR.

"We believe we took the right decision. We think it was entirely justified by the unprecedented circumstances on that day," Nick Clegg told NPR's All Things Considered on Thursday.

Greene notes the board doesn't preemptively make the decisions — such as Trump's suspension — for Facebook. Instead, it mainly reviews decisions already made by the company about removing content and determines whether to allow the content back on the platform.

Greene also notes this case will provide policy advice and obligations for how the company handles the accounts of politicians in the future — a reoccurring criticism for the company and its CEO.

"This is something that has been a challenge for the company and for other platforms in the past, given that political leaders are very differently situated than ordinary citizens," Greene said.

The board was formed last year to weigh the most difficult decisions over what Facebook allows users to post. It began accepting cases in October but has yet to issue a ruling.

Editor's note: Facebook is among NPR's financial supporters.

'The Mob Was Fed Lies': McConnell Rebukes Trump For His Role In Capitol Riot

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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell leaves the Senate chamber on Tuesday. In remarks, he publicly denounced President Trump for instigating the Jan. 6 insurrection on the Capitol. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell leaves the Senate chamber on Tuesday. In remarks, he publicly denounced President Trump for instigating the Jan. 6 insurrection on the Capitol.

Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

For the first time since the Jan. 6 mob attack on the U.S. Capitol, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell publicly denounced President Trump and his supporters for instigating the insurrection.

"The mob was fed lies," McConnell, R-Ky., said in a speech on the Senate floor Tuesday afternoon.

"They were provoked by the president and other powerful people, and they tried to use fear and violence to stop a specific proceeding of the first branch of the federal government, which they did not like."

Two weeks ago, after rioters stormed the Capitol as lawmakers were fulfilling their constitutional duty to tally the Electoral College votes, McConnell strongly condemned the mob but stopped short of calling out Trump for his role.

The outgoing majority leader has spent the past several years cautiously avoiding confrontations with Trump. But he's increased his criticism of the president in the waning weeks of his term as Trump continued to use his platform to spread misinformation about the election, which he lost to Joe Biden.

Ahead of the Jan. 6 insurrection, McConnell used his time on the Senate floor to reject allegations of election fraud by Trump and his allies, saying Trump's claims that the Nov. 3 election was stolen were partly based on conspiracy theories.

"Dozens of lawsuits received hearings and courtrooms all across our country. But over and over, the courts rejected these claims, including all star judges that the president himself had nominated," he said at the time.

"Nothing before us proves illegality anywhere near the massive scale ... that would have tipped the entire election. Nor can public doubt alone justify a radical break, when the doubt itself was incited without any evidence."

McConnell has not denied the possibility of voting against Trump at a potential Senate impeachment trial, precipitated by the House vote to impeach the president for an unprecedented second time over his role in the insurrection.

It's unclear when a Senate trial would begin as House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., has yet to deliver the sole article of impeachment against Trump to the Senate.

Incoming Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., who will take over that role in less than 24 hours, said Tuesday the Senate will move ahead with an impeachment trial with a plan for a separate vote to bar Trump from holding any future federal office if the Senate votes to convict.

"After what he has done, the consequences of which we were all witness to, Donald Trump should not be eligible to run for office ever again," he said.

"Healing and unity will only come if there is truth and accountability, not sweeping such a severe charge, such awful actions, under the rug."

Alleged members of several different right-wing and extremist groups are facing charges in connection with the Jan. 6 siege at the U.S. Capitol. Roberto Schmidt/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Roberto Schmidt/AFP via Getty Images

Alleged members of several different right-wing and extremist groups are facing charges in connection with the Jan. 6 siege at the U.S. Capitol.

Roberto Schmidt/AFP via Getty Images

Updated at 3:50 p.m. ET

Federal investigators say they have arrested several alleged members of extremist and white supremacist groups who participated in the Jan. 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol building, including multiple participants in an alleged conspiracy.

People allegedly affiliated with organizations such as The Three Percenters, The Oath Keepers, Proud Boys, Texas Freedom Force, and other self-described Nazis and white supremacists were among the mob that stormed the U.S. Capitol building, according to federal investigators.

Details of their arrests highlight how various extremist groups, with members throughout the country, coalesced to support Trump and his (disproven) claims that the November election was stolen. Law enforcement officials were able to track suspects down by using information gleaned from tipsters, social media posts shared by the accused, and news media coverage.

The Oath Keepers

Several people associated with the Oath Keepers are also facing charges related to the Capitol riot.

The FBI describes the Oath Keepers as a "large but loose organized collection of militia who believe that the federal government has been coopted by a shadowy conspiracy that is trying to strip American citizens of their rights."

Federal prosecutors are accusing Thomas Edward Caldwell, an apparent leader of the group, of helping to plan and coordinate the Jan. 6 storming of the U.S. Capitol.

Caldwell, a 65-year-old resident of Clarke County, Va., was arrested on Tuesday on four charges including conspiracy to commit offense against the United States, according to the Justice Department.

Citing Facebook messages, an FBI affidavit supporting the criminal complaint alleges that Caldwell was "involved in planning and coordinating" the breach of the Capitol building.

On Jan. 1, for example, federal investigators said Caldwell sent a message helping arrange hotel accommodations for Jan. 5-7. That same day, another alleged member of the group sent Caldwell a message in which he called him "Commander" and said "Guess I'll be seeing you soon. Will probably call you tomorrow...mainly because...I like to know wtf plan is."

On the evening of Jan. 6, Caldwell allegedly sent a flurry of Facebook messages about the day's riot, including a video that appears to have been taken inside the Capitol building. "I am such an instigator!" he allegedly wrote at one point.

"We need to do this at the local level," he wrote in another message, according to the investigators. "Lets [sic] storm the capitol in Ohio. Tell me when!"

According to the FBI, the Oath Keepers focuses on recruiting current and former military, law enforcement and first responders. The organization's name alludes to the oath sworn by members of the military and police to defend the Constitution "from all enemies, foreign and domestic."

It also describes video footage showing "8 to 10 individuals in paramilitary equipment aggressively approaching an entrance to the Capitol building." Prosecutors describe those individuals as moving "in an organized and practiced fashion," and based on their movements and clothing, believe them to be members of the Oath Keepers.

The FBI's affidavit identifies two other group members by name as having participated in the riot, Jessica Watkins and Donovan Crowl.

Watkins and Crowl, both of Champaign County, Ohio, were arrested Jan. 18.

Investigators say they are members of a group called the Ohio State Regular Militia, a local militia organization which pays dues to the Oath Keepers.

According to investigators, Watkins is a self-described commanding officer of the Ohio State Regular Militia. She shared videos online showing her and Crowl, at the Capitol, writing, "Yeah. We stormed the Capitol today. Teargassed, the whole, 9. Pushed our way into the Rotunda. Made it into the Senate even. The news is lying (even Fox) about the Historical Events we created today."

Another man allegedly linked to the Oath Keepers, but not explicitly named as part of the conspiracy, has also been arrested.

Jon Ryan Schaffer, of Columbus, Ind., a heavy metal musician and founder of the band Iced Earth, turned himself in to FBI agents in Indianapolis on Jan. 17.

An FBI affidavit says Schaffer has "long held far-right extremist views." He allegedly sprayed Capitol Police officers with bear spray as rioters pushed their way into the building. He is captured in videos and photos wearing a blue hooded sweatshirt under a tactical vest with a baseball cap that reads "Oath Keepers Lifetime Member."

Investigators say that when Schaffer took part in the Million MAGA March in Washington, D.C., in November, he told a reporter, "We're not going to merge into some globalist, communist system, it will not happen. There will be a lot of bloodshed if it comes down to that, trust me."

The Three Percenters

Guy Wesley Reffitt, of Wylie, Texas, was arrested Jan. 18 in his home state. He is facing charges of trespassing on restricted areas of the Capitol grounds and obstruction of justice.

Reffitt's wife told police that he is a member of the Texas Freedom Force, an extremist militia group, according to court documents.

The Texas Freedom Force, however, says on Twitter that the FBI has it wrong and that the group "is not a extremist militia (we are a nonprofit) & are far from extremist, the FBI didn't do their homework."

Reffitt's wife shared with authorities that he also belongs to the Three Percenters. The FBI says the group is born of the myth that only three percent of American colonists took up arms against the British during the American Revolution. Members of the group believe that a small force of well-armed and prepared members with a just cause can overthrow a tyrannical government.

Court documents say Reffitt threatened his son and daughter following his return home from the Jan. 6 siege at the Capitol. Reffitt's son said he saw his father bring home an AR-15 rifle and a Smith & Wesson pistol when he returned. Those firearms, among others, were retrieved by police when they searched his home.

Reffitt told his adult son that if he "crossed the line" and reported him to the police, Reffitt would have no option but to "do what he had to do," according to the affidavit. Reffitt's children told their mother what their father said to them. She confronted Reffitt and he said, "he was trying to protect the family, and if someone was a traitor then that's what's going to happen."

Robert Gieswein, from Woodland Park, Colo., is also believed to be a member of the Three Percenters, according to the FBI. He is facing charges in connection with an assault on a Capitol Police officer with pepper spray, a barricade surrounding the Capitol grounds, and a baseball bat. According to court documents, Gieswein posted a photo of himself on social media flashing the Three Percenters' sign and wearing clothing with the organization's logo.

The FBI says Gieswein also runs a private paramilitary group called the Woodland Wild Dogs, the patch of which he was seen wearing on the front of his tactical military vest in footage from the Capitol. In photos and videos, Gieswein is also seen wearing a helmet, goggles, and a black camouflage backpack.

Gieswein told reporters that "corrupt" politicians, of which he includes President-elect Joe Biden and Vice President-elect Kamala Harris, have sold the country out to the "Rothschilds and Rockefellers." The idea is a common conspiracy theory among far-right extremists who believe that a shadow force, including the famous European banking family and the American industrial and political dynasty, controls global currency.

Nazis and Proud Boys

Bryan Betancur, a self-professed white supremacist who has told law enforcement officers that he is a member of several white supremacist organizations, was caught on video during the riots. He was arrested Jan. 17.

Betancur, who was on probation when he went to the Capitol, has voiced "homicidal ideations, made comments about conducting a school shooting, and has researched mass shootings," according to court documents.

He is also engaged online in racist, violent extremist groups and has voiced support for James Fields, the neo-Nazi convicted of killing Heather Heyer during the 2017 Charlottesville, Va., "Unite the Right" rally, the FBI said. Betancur, who was arrested in Maryland on Jan. 17, is seen in videos of the Capitol attack flashing hand signals associated with white supremacy and wearing a Proud Boys t-shirt. The Proud Boys is a white nationalist organization with multiple U.S. chapters.

Betancur, of Silver Spring, Md., also goes by the online aliases Bryan Clooney and Maximo Clooney, according to court documents.

Dominic Pezzola, a former Marine and Proud Boys member known as "Spaz" or "Spazzo" was arrested Jan. 15 in New York. Pezzola, who is from Rochester, N.Y., is seen in photos and videos of the Capitol riot wearing a black short-sleeved t-shirt with yellow, consistent with the "Proud Boys" logo, the FBI said.

A witness said Pezzola and others involved in the riots acknowledged that they would have "killed Vice President Mike Pence if given the chance."

Pence was at the Capitol in hiding during the attack.

Another individual charged is Timothy Hale-Cusanelli, a member of the U.S. Army Reserve, who as a defense contractor at Naval Weapons Station Earle in New Jersey has a security clearance and access to a variety of munitions, according to court documents.

A police affidavit says Hale-Cusanelli, of Colts Neck, N.J., is "an avowed white supremacist and Nazi sympathizer" who posts videos on YouTube under the title the "Based Hermes Show," showcasing extreme political viewpoints.

A tipster told the FBI that Hale-Cusanelli had shared cell phone videos with the informant showing him at the Capitol building harassing police officers. Hale-Cusanelli also admitted to entering the Capitol and encouraging other members of the mob to "advance" – giving directions by voice and hand signals.

He was arrested Jan. 17 in New Jersey.

U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, a Democrat from California, speaks during a news conference at the U.S. Capitol on Friday. Sarah Silbiger/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Sarah Silbiger/Bloomberg via Getty Images

U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, a Democrat from California, speaks during a news conference at the U.S. Capitol on Friday.

Sarah Silbiger/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Updated Jan. 19 at 12:42 a.m. ET

Authorities have arrested a woman who the FBI says may have stolen a laptop computer or hard drive from House Speaker Nancy Pelosi's office during the Capitol riot earlier this month. The bureau says it is investigating whether she planned to funnel the device to Russia's foreign intelligence agency.

Riley June Williams, a Pennsylvania woman, was arrested on Monday in her home state on charges related to the Jan. 6 breach of the U.S. Capitol, including entering a restricted building, disrupting the orderly conduct of government and engaging in disorderly or disruptive conduct.

However, a complaint/arrest warrant from Sunday says the FBI is investigating a claim that Williams stole a laptop or hard drive from the speaker's office. According to one witness, described as a former romantic partner of Williams, the accused "intended to send the computer device to a friend in Russia, who then planned to sell the device to SVR, Russia's foreign intelligence service."

Richard Barnett, a supporter of President Trump, holds a piece of mail as he sits inside the office of Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi after pro-Trump rioters breached the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., on Jan. 6. Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

Richard Barnett, a supporter of President Trump, holds a piece of mail as he sits inside the office of Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi after pro-Trump rioters breached the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., on Jan. 6.

Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

The unidentified witness said "for unknown reasons" the plan fell through and that Williams "still has the computer device or destroyed it."

"This matter remains under investigation," the FBI said.

In the days following the attack — in which rioters ransacked the speaker's office and ripped a name plate from above her door — Drew Hammill, Pelosi's chief of staff, confirmed in a tweet that a laptop "only used for presentations" had been taken from a conference room in the speaker's office.

The speaker's office told NPR Monday that it declined to comment on the court filing.

Sunday's complaint provides a link to a documentary filmed and produced by the London-based ITV News that includes footage shot inside the Capitol as the rioters streamed in. At about 20:40 into the video, a woman in glasses, wearing a green shirt and brown trench coat and carrying a black-and-white bag over her shoulder, identified as Williams, can be seen yelling "upstairs, upstairs, upstairs," pushing and urging people in the general direction of Pelosi's office.

The documentary singles out the woman, saying she was "disciplined, focused, with a sense of urgency, directing people up a staircase."

The same woman can be seen in other video taken outside the Capitol building on Jan. 6, according to the affidavit.

The FBI says Williams' mother filed a report with police in Harrisburg, Pa., about a suspicious person on Jan. 11 but that when officers interviewed her, Williams herself was not present. The suspicious person "was assumed" to be the same witness who had alleged Williams intended to sell the stolen laptop or hard drive, the bureau says.

"According to the Harrisburg officers, on January 16, 2021, they again spoke with WILLIAMS' mother who told them that a British media crew had come to her home the night before, asking to speak with WILLIAMS, who was not present. The news crew presented WILLIAMS' mother with one or more images taken at the U.S. Capitol on January 6, 2021. Her mother acknowledged that it was WILLIAMS in the image," the complaint says.

In a separate ITV News segment posted Jan. 16, the documentary crew interviews Wendy Williams, who identified herself as the mother of the woman in the video and confirmed that the video showed her daughter. In the segment, the mother says that her daughter is not home.

More than 125 people have been arrested so far in connection with the attack on the Capitol, on charges from curfew violations to federal felonies, according to The Associated Press.

Minnesota State Patrol stand guard outside the Minnesota Capitol building on Sunday in St Paul, Minnesota. Stephen Maturen/Getty Images hide caption

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Stephen Maturen/Getty Images

Minnesota State Patrol stand guard outside the Minnesota Capitol building on Sunday in St Paul, Minnesota.

Stephen Maturen/Getty Images

Police were on high alert in state capitals around the U.S. Sunday, after warnings that pro-Trump extremists might attempt to storm legislatures similar to the assault on the U.S. Capitol last week. But at many statehouses and capitols, security and the media outnumbered protesters.

The streets were quiet in Washington, D.C., where police, the military and security agencies are intent on preventing any far-right groups from trying to disrupt President-elect Joe Biden's inauguration on Wednesday. At least three people have been arrested in separate incidents at checkpoints, as the DCist site reports. Thousands of National Guard members are fortifying security at the Capitol and along the National Mall.

Armed demonstrators protest outside of the Michigan state capital building on Sunday in Lansing, Michigan. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Armed demonstrators protest outside of the Michigan state capital building on Sunday in Lansing, Michigan.

Scott Olson/Getty Images

In Denver, the Colorado Capitol's lower windows were covered in anticipation of possible unrest — but hardly anyone showed up on Sunday. "I'm really surprised. I figured there'd be more than this," a supporter of President Trump told Colorado Public Radio.

In Lansing, where protesters swarmed Michigan's Capitol building last May and a plot against the governor was uncovered in recent months, Sunday's protest was deemed "eclectic, but small and dull" by Michigan Radio. Events remained quiet, despite some demonstrators bringing their guns to the protest.

In Georgia, a military Humvee was parked next to a statue of Martin Luther King, Jr., on the grounds of the statehouse in Atlanta. Some downtown streets were blocked off by dump trucks, Georgia Public Broadcasting reports. The outlet describes the mood in the city as a "tense calm."

There was "relative quiet at the Oregon State Capitol," according to Oregon Public Broadcasting, despite the arrival of a small group of armed demonstrators. The group included members of the extremist "boogaloos" movement, who are known for advocating for a new civil war.

A demonstrator shouts slogans in front of members of the National Guard outside the Kentucky State Capitol in Frankfort, Kentucky. BloombergScotty Perry/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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BloombergScotty Perry/Bloomberg/Getty Images

A demonstrator shouts slogans in front of members of the National Guard outside the Kentucky State Capitol in Frankfort, Kentucky.

BloombergScotty Perry/Bloomberg/Getty Images

"A couple dozen armed demonstrators gathered at the Texas Capitol on Sunday," member station KUT reports, adding that the group said they had come to spread a "message of individual liberty." But not many people were around to hear it, as the grounds were closed.

In Florida, the Capitol in Tallahassee was mainly populated by a range of law enforcement agencies and journalists, according to member station WFSU — which reports a man as he rode by on a bicycle called out, "It's a beautiful day! Nothing happening here!"

There are a number of possible explanations for the smaller than expected protests – including that some right-wing activists are reluctant to congregate at a time when police are looking for any sign of trouble and the FBI is vigorously seeking people to face charges related to the assault in Washington.

Federal authorities have made dozens of arrests around the country in connection with the violent insurrection in Washington, which left five people dead. More people were taken into custody over the weekend.

Utah National Guard troops patrol at the Utah State Capitol building during a nationwide protest called by anti-government and far-right groups supporting President Trump. George Frey/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Utah National Guard troops patrol at the Utah State Capitol building during a nationwide protest called by anti-government and far-right groups supporting President Trump.

George Frey/AFP/Getty Images

Some groups seem to want to wait things out, says Oren Segal of the Anti-Defamation League's Center on Extremism.

"I think people are spooked by the fact there have been many arrests," Segal said. "I think in some cases, they think that the events that are planned are honey pots that are created to get them in trouble."

The result, he adds, is that "we've seen a lot of pushback about actually showing up" at new protests.

Since the assault, social media outlets and tech companies have been making it more difficult for conspiracy theorists to repeat false claims that the Nov. 3 election was rigged, and that Trump was not truly defeated by President-elect Joe Biden.

A major blow to organizers and conspiracy theorists came last weekend, when Parler, seen as a conservative alternative to Twitter, went dark after Amazon stopped hosting its web site. Apple and Google also stripped Parler from their app offerings.

A small group of anti-government, pro-gun protesters demonstrate outside the Texas State Capitol building in Austin, Texas. Sergio Flores/Getty Images hide caption

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A small group of anti-government, pro-gun protesters demonstrate outside the Texas State Capitol building in Austin, Texas.

Sergio Flores/Getty Images

In addition, Facebook is targeting content with messages such as "stop the steal," and Twitter suspended more than 70,000 accounts related to QAnon, the conspiracy theory group that some law enforcement agencies now deem a cult.

NPR's Sarah McCammon contributed to this report.

Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene, R-Ga., yells at journalists after setting off the metal detector outside the doors to the House of Representatives Chamber on Jan. 12. Twitter suspended the newly elected lawmaker's account temporarily on Sunday. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene, R-Ga., yells at journalists after setting off the metal detector outside the doors to the House of Representatives Chamber on Jan. 12. Twitter suspended the newly elected lawmaker's account temporarily on Sunday.

Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Twitter locked Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene out of her account on the social media platform on Sunday, citing violations of a company policy that it recently used to remove thousands of QAnon-related accounts. The suspension is in effect for 12 hours.

Greene has repeatedly endorsed the QAnon conspiracy theory, which has sought to portray President Trump as being undermined by a deep-state cabal.

When reached on Sunday, a Twitter spokesperson told NPR that the Georgia Republican's account "has been temporarily locked out for multiple violations of our civic integrity policy."

The company's policy was updated after the recent insurrection at the U.S. Capitol — a deadly event during which Greene and others were seen not wearing face masks in a secure room where a crowd of people were sheltering.

Greene's account is still viewable to the public. The newly elected representative's most recent messages on the platform repeat false claims that elections that resulted in Trump's defeat and key Republican losses in the Senate were flawed. Key election officials in Georgia, she said, had been "begged by Republicans to fix our elections."

Twitter affixed a warning notice to Greene's message about the recent national election stating, "This claim of election fraud is disputed, and this Tweet can't be replied to, Retweeted or liked to a risk of violence." Those limits on engagement were introduced as part of the social media company's new approach to messages that are deemed to violate its civic integrity policy.

On Tuesday, Twitter announced that it has suspended more than 70,000 accounts that were used to share content about QAnon.

Sen. Josh Hawley, R-Mo., has come under heavy criticism for objecting to Electoral College results during Congress' certification of President-elect Joe Biden's win. Jim Lo Scalzo/Getty Images hide caption

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Sen. Josh Hawley, R-Mo., has come under heavy criticism for objecting to Electoral College results during Congress' certification of President-elect Joe Biden's win.

Jim Lo Scalzo/Getty Images

Loews Hotels says it will no longer allow a fundraiser for Sen. Josh Hawley scheduled for February to be held at one of its hotels. The move is the latest fallout from the Missouri Republican's widely criticized decision to object to Electoral College results during Congress' certification of President-elect Joe Biden's win.

"We are horrified and opposed to the events at the Capitol and all who supported and incited the actions," the company said Saturday in a statement on Twitter. "In light of those events and for the safety of our guests and team members, we have informed the host of the Feb. fundraiser that it will no longer be held at Loews Hotels."

The fundraiser was organized by a political action committee, Fighting for Missouri, and was scheduled to take place Feb. 12 to 15 in Orlando, Fla., at the Loews Portofino Bay Hotel at Universal Orlando. A flyer for the event promised a "fun-filled-family-friendly" time, with tickets ranging from $1,000 to $5,000, depending on group size.

Hawley, an ally of President Trump, has continued to receive heavy backlash for his decision to object to Electoral College results during Congress' certification of the electoral votes, after a mob of pro-Trump extremists stormed the U.S. Capitol in what became a deadly insurrection.

Simon & Schuster announced on Jan. 7 that it had canceled the publication of Hawley's book, The Tyranny of Big Tech, which was slated for a June release. The publishing company said it could not support Hawley "after his role in what became a dangerous threat to our democracy and freedom."

The editorial boards from two of the largest newspapers in his home state, The Kansas City Star and the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, have called for Hawley to resign. The Star went so far as to say Hawley, "has blood on his hands" and is the second-most-culpable person for the attacks.

Hawley was photographed greeting protesters outside the Capitol with a raised fist in an apparent show of solidarity before the riots began. He has defended his decision to object to Electoral College results.

Fellow Republicans and even past mentors have spoken out against Hawley and have expressed their regret in prior support for him.

The Lincoln Project, another PAC run by top Republican strategists, has called Hawley "public enemy No. 1." Former GOP Sen. John Danforth, a mentor of Hawley's, has said that recruiting Hawley for a U.S. Senate run and supporting him was the "biggest mistake I've ever made."

The federal prison complex in Terre Haute, Ind., is pictured in August 2020. All federal prisons in the United States have been placed on lockdown. Law enforcement agencies are taking measures in the aftermath of Jan. 6 insurrection and over concerns of more violence. Michael Conroy/AP hide caption

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Michael Conroy/AP

The federal prison complex in Terre Haute, Ind., is pictured in August 2020. All federal prisons in the United States have been placed on lockdown. Law enforcement agencies are taking measures in the aftermath of Jan. 6 insurrection and over concerns of more violence.

Michael Conroy/AP

Authorities are locking down all federal prisons as the country braces for potential violence leading into Wednesday's swearing-in of President-elect Joe Biden.

The lockdown was announced early Saturday morning. A statement from the Bureau of Prisons does not specify the length of the lockdown but says the agency was securing all of its facilities as a precautionary measure brought on by "current events occurring around the country."

"In securing the facilities, the hope is that this prudent measure is for a short period and that operations will be restored to their prior status as soon as practical," the agency said. "We will continue to monitor events carefully and will adjust operations accordingly as the situation continues to evolve."

The Associated Press reports that the lockdown went into effect at midnight Saturday, after inmates had been secured in their cells for the night. The Bureau of Prisons statement goes on to say that inmates would still be provided with access to email and telephones but that communication with families would be limited.

The agency also says that no specific information led to the lockdown nor was it in response to any ''significant" event occurring within a federal prison.

Shane Fausey, president of the Council Of Prison Locals, which represents some 30,000 prison employees, praised the decision.

"The Bureau of Prisons and its professional Federal Law Enforcement employees train for all types of conditions and ways to not only manage emergencies, but more importantly to prevent serious incidents from occurring. Protecting our communities, the inmates entrusted in our care, and all of our employees that stand on the last line of defense is a responsibility that we do not take lightly," Fausey said in a statement.

Law enforcement agencies have been taking measures in the aftermath of the Jan. 6 insurrection at the Capitol and over fears of violence leading into Biden's swearing-in. Several states worked to secure their Capitol buildings and the FBI has issued a warning for all 50 states.

The Bureau of Prisons is also sending members of its Special Operations Response Team to Washington, D.C., to assist security efforts after the mob spurred on by President Trump breached the Capitol earlier this month, the AP reports. About 100 officers had been sent to the Justice Department and were deputized by the U.S. Marshals Service earlier this month.

Prior to Saturday's announcement, federal prisons had been under modified operations to contain the spread of COVID-19. More than 38,000 inmates and 3,500 staff in federal prisons have had COVID-19 since the start of the pandemic, and 190 inmates and three staff members have died of the disease.

The Capitol seen on Saturday. Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

The Capitol seen on Saturday.

Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

U.S. Capitol Police say they arrested the driver of a truck who presented unauthorized inauguration credentials at a security checkpoint near the Capitol and was in possession of a loaded handgun and hundreds of rounds of ammunition.

Police said Wesley Allen Beeler was arrested shortly after 6:30 p.m. Friday night after stopping at a checkpoint.

Authorities said one officer noticed several firearms-related decals on Beeler's truck, including one that said, "If they come for your guns Give 'Em your bullets first."

When asked, Beeler admitted to having a Glock in the vehicle. Police say that in addition to the loaded handgun, they recovered more than 500 rounds of 9mm ammunition and 21 shotgun shells in the truck.

Beeler, who is from Virginia, was charged Saturday with carrying a pistol without a license.

Beeler's family told The Washington Post they were surprised by the arrest, because Beeler works in private security and had said he was working on security near the Capitol. Records from Virginia's department of criminal justice services show Beeler has credentials for private security work and endorsements for handguns, shotguns and patrol rifles.

Areas of Washington, D.C. have seen increased security following the Jan. 6 insurrection at the Capitol and over concerns of potential violence on Inauguration Day.

A memorial for U.S. Capitol Police Officer Brian Sicknick, who was killed by rioters in the Jan. 6 attack, is set up near the U.S. Capitol. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

A memorial for U.S. Capitol Police Officer Brian Sicknick, who was killed by rioters in the Jan. 6 attack, is set up near the U.S. Capitol.

Andrew Harnik/AP

The U.S. House of Representatives has opened an investigation into this month's attack on the U.S. Capitol. In a letter to the heads of America's leading intelligence and law enforcement agencies, House lawmakers asked for any information that could help them understand whether warning signs were missed.

Lawmakers want to know what the intelligence community and federal law enforcement knew about the threats of violence and whether that information was shared with the right people. Capitol Police have said they were unprepared for the ferocity of the attack, which left one of its officers dead.

"Security and logistical preparations before January 6 were not consistent with the prospect of serious and widespread violence," lawmakers wrote Saturday. "Yet, according to media accounts that have surfaced in recent days, federal and other authorities earlier on possessed — and may have shared with some parties — intelligence and other information forecasting a dire security threat against the Congress's meeting to certify the election results."

"These latter reports, if acted upon, might have prompted more extensive planning for the event, and the infusion of far greater security and other resources," the letter continued. "Tragically that did not happen."

The letter was signed by Intelligence Committee Chair Adam Schiff, D-Calif., Homeland Security Committee Chair Bennie Thompson, D-Miss., Judiciary Committee Chair Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., and Committee on Oversight and Reform Chair Carolyn Maloney, D-N.Y.

Lawmakers are also looking for any potential collaborators within the U.S. government itself. They've asked for any intelligence about people with security clearances or who hold positions in U.S. national security organizations who may have participated in the insurrection.

They're also seeking information about potential foreign involvement in the attack: Did the insurrection have "any nexus to foreign influence or misinformation efforts"?

Also Saturday, Democratic members of the Committee on Oversight and Reform wrote to an association of police chiefs to determine how much local law enforcement was involved in the Capitol attack and to see whether any threats remain.

Nearly 30 police officers from departments across the country participated in the pro-Trump rally before the Capitol was stormed. Several are facing federal criminal charges in relation to the riot.

"We are deeply disturbed by reports that a small number of law enforcement officers participated directly in this despicable act of violence against the U.S. Government, thereby placing innocent people and their fellow officers at risk," said the letter, written by Maloney and Rep. Jamie Raskin, D-Md.

The letter continued: "As law enforcement officers fulfill their responsibility — and put their lives on the line — to defend our country, we must work to identify any individuals within police ranks who have taken action to undermine those efforts, and prevent others who seek to join them."

On Friday, the Department of Justice said it had begun an internal review of its response to the Capitol attack, including "whether there are any weakness in DOJ protocols, policies, or procedures" that impacted its ability to prepare for the attack.

A temporary 6-foot-high chain-link fence now surrounds California's state Capitol. Gov. Gavin Newsom said Thursday, "Let me be clear: There will be no tolerance for violence." Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP

A temporary 6-foot-high chain-link fence now surrounds California's state Capitol. Gov. Gavin Newsom said Thursday, "Let me be clear: There will be no tolerance for violence."

Rich Pedroncelli/AP

Governors across the nation are fortifying statehouses amid fears of possibly violent protests in the lead-up to President-elect Joe Biden's inauguration on Wednesday.

The Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol raised fears across the nation of armed protesters amassing at statehouses. Many states began putting new security measures in place, including increasing law enforcement personnel and activating National Guard troops as legislators returned to work.

The FBI specifically warned this week of potentially violent protests in all 50 states ahead of Biden's swearing-in as the nation's 46th president. As the weekend drew near, statehouses began erecting barricades, fencing and boards as officials braced for potential violence.

On Friday, Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer, who had been the target of an alleged kidnapping plot last year, activated the state's National Guard ahead of a protest reportedly planned for Sunday.

"The security enhancements that we have made are both seen — such as the increase in uniformed personnel and a perimeter fence — and unseen, which are things we have no intention of discussing or disclosing because these efforts are meant to be covert," said Col. Joe Gasper, the Michigan State Police director, said at a Friday news conference.

Armed protesters took to the Michigan Statehouse in Lansing last spring over coronavirus restrictions. Leaders in the state's GOP-controlled legislature have canceled next week's sessions because of "credible threats" of violence.

In Oregon, state lawmakers announced they would delay gathering in person for the start of their legislative session this week by at least a day. Oregon has also deployed its National Guard — as have California, Pennsylvania, Virginia, Washington and Wisconsin.

"We're treating this very seriously and deploying significant resources to protect public safety, critical infrastructure and First Amendment rights," said California Gov. Gavin Newsom in a Thursday video announcement. "But let me be clear: There will be no tolerance for violence."

Kansas has said it would continue legislative business while upping security measures and restricting visitors with official and scheduled business for at least a week.

Many states are also relying on added support from law enforcement to help secure their legislative buildings. Georgia began deploying SWAT teams to the Statehouse in Atlanta this week, while in Texas more than 100 state troopers in full tactical gear were on-site as armed protesters gathered outside.

Kentucky Gov. Andy Beshear told NPR's Weekend Edition that state police, local police and the National Guard would be securing the Statehouse in Frankfort.

"My commitment as the governor of Kentucky is that we will not let what happened at the U.S. Capitol happen here," Beshear said. "It's time that we stop playing patty-cake with so-called militias, acting like they're just dressed up for Halloween. They are dangerous, and we've got to treat them as such."

Beshear said that no permits had been issued to protest at the state's Capitol grounds and that protesters would be met with "serious concern" amid credible threats of violence.

NPR member stations Texas Public Radio, Oregon Public Broadcasting, Michigan Radio, WAMC and KCUR contributed to this report.

A member of the Virginia National Guard stands outside the razor wire fencing surrounding the U.S. Capitol on Friday. Up to 25,000 troops are expected by Inauguration Day. Liz Lynch/Getty Images hide caption

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Liz Lynch/Getty Images

A member of the Virginia National Guard stands outside the razor wire fencing surrounding the U.S. Capitol on Friday. Up to 25,000 troops are expected by Inauguration Day.

Liz Lynch/Getty Images

Next week's swearing-in of President-elect Joe Biden will see the biggest security presence of any inauguration in U.S. history. For days, thousands of National Guard troops have been pouring into the capital, and by Wednesday's ceremony, up to 25,000 troops will be in place to guard against security threats.

The nation's capital will look much different than it did in the days leading up to the attack on the U.S. Capitol building earlier this month. The area around the Capitol has been blocked off by barricades, and the National Mall is already closed to the public across its entire length — from the Capitol down to the Lincoln Memorial, 2 miles away.

"We cannot allow a recurrence of the chaos and illegal activity that the United States and the world witnessed last week," Matt Miller, head of the U.S. Secret Service's Washington field office, told reporters Friday.

Troops are pouring in from all over the country. "I'm sorry I have to ask you to leave your families and head down to our nation's capital because our country is so broken right now that we have to defend the Constitution," Maj. Gen. Gary Keefe reportedly told Massachusetts National Guard troops Saturday morning.

Those troops will join the thousands of camouflaged troops already in the capital, many carrying M4 rifles. And workers are installing miles worth of metal fencing to hold people back. "It looks like a military staging area because that's exactly what it is," NPR's Greg Myre told All Things Considered.

Members of the National Guard walk past the Capitol in Washington on Thursday. By next week, they will be joined by thousands of others. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Members of the National Guard walk past the Capitol in Washington on Thursday. By next week, they will be joined by thousands of others.

Andrew Harnik/AP

There's really no historical precedent for this level of National Guard activation. DCist reports that more than 13,000 Guard troops were called into the District after the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. in 1968 — the most to occupy a city since the Civil War. But that's only about half as many as are expected in the coming days.

To put things in perspective: Only 5,000 U.S. service members are currently stationed in Iraq and Afghanistan.

In terms of security, the only thing comparable to Biden's inauguration is that of Abraham Lincoln in 1861, shortly before the Civil War broke out, says Heather Cox Richardson, a professor of history at Boston College. "He rode to the inauguration surrounded by soldiers and cavalry, soldiers were stationed around the streets, and sharpshooters were on the roofs," says Richardson, who writes a popular blog that puts American history in context.

"But Americans had never experienced an assassination before, and we did not yet have a Secret Service, so there was no real concept of keeping the public at a distance," Richardson tells NPR. "I guess the bottom line is that we are in uncharted waters."

National Guard troops will join the thousands of D.C. police and federal agents already in place, with security efforts of their own.

D.C. officials have warned would-be visitors to stay away and instead enjoy the inauguration virtually from their homes. It would be difficult for many to get into the city anyway, as four major bridges from Virginia will be closed from the day before until the day after the inauguration.

It will also be harder for known extremists to get to Washington by plane. The Transportation Security Administration says it's vetting hundreds of names passed along by law enforcement agencies. And it has beefed up security at all three D.C.-area airports, adding more bomb-sniffing dogs, more random gate screenings and more federal air marshals.

"Our intelligence and vetting professionals are working diligently around the clock to ensure those who may pose a threat to our aviation sector undergo enhanced screening or are prevented from boarding an aircraft," TSA Administrator David Pekoske said in a statement Friday.

Despite the heightened danger, Biden will deliver his inaugural address just outside the Capitol, a tradition dating back nearly 200 years.

"We do think it's important to honor some of those grand traditions of the inaugural — most notably, that swearing-in on the west front of the Capitol," Tony Allen, head of the Biden-Harris Presidential Inaugural Committee, told NPR's Weekend Edition. That committee is working closely with the Secret Service to ensure a safe inauguration.

"I feel very strongly that this will be a very secure and safe event," Allen said. "We have taken every precaution."

Many of the activities leading up to the inaugural events are virtual, but that is largely because of the coronavirus that has killed nearly 400,000 Americans and completely reshaped life in the U.S. and the world. Other than heightened security, the events surrounding the inauguration are mostly unchanged.

"There hasn't been that much change because when we were planning the inauguration, we were planning it in a world of a pandemic," Stephanie Cutter, who is helping produce the inauguration, told All Things Considered.

"So there were no events with large crowds," Cutter said. "There was a scaled-down version of the swearing-in on the west front of the Capitol. And some of our events that are taking place have a very light footprint."

The U.S. Capitol is seen behind a fence with razor wire during sunrise Saturday. The FBI has warned of additional threats in the nation's capital and in all 50 states. Samuel Corum/Getty Images hide caption

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Samuel Corum/Getty Images

The U.S. Capitol is seen behind a fence with razor wire during sunrise Saturday. The FBI has warned of additional threats in the nation's capital and in all 50 states.

Samuel Corum/Getty Images

The Biden inauguration team has scheduled four days of events leading up to the day itself. Those include a virtual concert, a National Day of Service in honor of Martin Luther King Jr. Day and a nationwide memorial to honor lives lost to COVID-19.

After his inaugural address, Biden will receive a presidential escort to the White House. Online chatter over the past weeks had included statements from supporters urging pro-Trump extremists to meet in D.C. and try to prevent Biden from entering the White House, but given the ubiquitous presence of troops and other security forces, such a move would prove challenging if not impossible.

And Facebook has temporarily blocked people from creating any new Facebook events near the White House or Capitol through Inauguration Day.

Steven Sund was chief of U.S. Capitol Police during the Jan. 6 insurrection. He resigned after the attack but defends his agency's preparations. Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call via Getty Images hide caption

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Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call via Getty Images

Steven Sund was chief of U.S. Capitol Police during the Jan. 6 insurrection. He resigned after the attack but defends his agency's preparations.

Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call via Getty Images

Updated at 7:25 p.m. ET

As thousands of National Guard troops now buttress security in Washington, D.C., and the nation, former U.S. Capitol Police Chief Steven Sund is standing by his actions, and those of his agency, on Jan. 6 — the day pro-Trump rioters attacked the Capitol under his watch.

In an interview with NPR, Sund says he had already planned to have 1,400 to 1,500 officers on duty, "all hands on deck." He said Capitol Police expected a large crowd but said nothing prepared them for what actually happened.

"We expected some additional violence maybe between some of the counterprotesters — that's one of the reasons we went to the all hands on deck, but nothing like what we saw," said the former longtime member of the D.C. Metropolitan Police Department. "I've been in law enforcement 30 years. I've never seen anything like that in my life."

Sund said he spoke to then-House Sergeant-at-Arms Paul Irving on Jan. 4 about additional aid from the National Guard but was turned down. He had hoped to have service members along the larger perimeter set with police barricades.

Sund said he believes Irving consulted with his Senate counterpart, Sergeant-at-Arms Michael Stenger, and then Irving told him there were concerns of optics. These were driven perhaps by "just the military being probably around the Capitol complex," said Sund who, along with Irving and Stenger, all resigned soon after the attack.

Sund said Capitol Police did not receive intelligence from the FBI or other agencies of an orchestrated attack. It was later revealed that the FBI was aware of some extremist activity and said it shared a warning with its partners, including the Capitol Police.

He also rejects claims that bias, or systemic racism, played a role in the decisions leading up to, or on, that day. He said it's unfair to compare security for the joint session with other high-profile events at the Capitol, such as the 2018 Supreme Court confirmation hearings for Justice Brett Kavanaugh, which saw more than 200 arrests.

"They must not have been watching the same video I was watching. I was watching officers fighting for their lives on Wednesday," Sund said. "That's no comparison — one was a demonstration and one is a violent attack."

However, he signaled that perhaps congressional oversight of Capitol Police may have had a role to play in the security failures.

"I know a number of a number of groups are investigating this incident. I think they'll find that it's a very convoluted, bureaucratic method of maintaining security in the nation's capital," Sund said.

The day after the attack the top security officials at the Capitol — the House sergeant-at-arms, Irving, and the Senate sergeant-at-arms, Stenger — resigned their posts following requests from top leaders of both parties. Sund resigned his position hours after House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and others called for his removal.

On Jan. 7, Pelosi said she had not talked to Sund when she called for him to step down.

"And I think Mr. Sund – he hasn't even called us since this happened," Pelosi told reporters. "So, I have made him aware that I would be saying that we're calling for his resignation."

An aide to Pelosi later clarified she was referring to the hours since the last conversation with Sund, which occurred early in the evening Jan. 6.

Sund told NPR he spoke with Pelosi three times on Jan. 6, including a call with top leaders about reconvening in the House and Senate to continue the count of the electoral votes.

"It was very chaotic that evening, I know. I can only imagine just how busy Speaker Pelosi was that night. I know I had been on at least three phone calls with her," he said.

Members of the National Guard surround Capitol Hill on Thursday in preparation for next week's presidential inauguration. Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

One phone call occurred at 6:25 p.m. ET, Sund says, when he spoke to Pelosi and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell to coordinate their returns back into their respective chambers.

Sund told NPR on Friday that he increasingly believes the insurrection was part of a coordinated, planned attack on the Capitol. Specifically, Sund believes that reports of pipe bombs planted at the headquarter offices of the Republican National Committee and the Democratic National Committee in southeast Washington were part of an effort to distract police as the violent mob approached the Capitol complex. The Justice Department said it has "no direct evidence of kill or capture teams" but is still looking into what kind of planning there was.

Sund said moments before those reports came through, he was in the operations center for Capitol Police and watching the rally with President Trump at the Ellipse.

"We had the volume up a little bit so I can kind of hear what was going on, listening for anything — anything that was going on down there," Sund said. Then "we had to turn the volume down to, you know, again, to direct our attention toward the first pipe bomb that was over at the Republican National Committee."

The FBI has said the first pipe bomb was reported at 1 p.m. ET at the RNC in southeast Washington, followed by a report of a second pipe bomb at the DNC at 1:15 p.m. A suspect in that case has not be identified.

"I think that's all part of the concerted and coordinated efforts that led to the violent attack," Sund said. "Those were diversionary tactics to pull resources away from the Hill in advance of that attack. I honestly believe that."

Sund said he believes new information since released by the FBI and others signal this could have been part of a coordinated attack.

"This was not a demonstration. This was not a failure to plan for a demonstration. This was a planned, coordinated attack on the United States Capitol," Sund said.

Pelosi appoints investigation leader

House Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., has launched a security review of the Capitol following last week's attack on the building that resulted in five deaths. Samuel Corum/Getty Images hide caption

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Samuel Corum/Getty Images

House Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., has launched a security review of the Capitol following last week's attack on the building that resulted in five deaths.

Samuel Corum/Getty Images

On Friday, Pelosi said she has asked retired Lt. Gen. Russel Honoré to lead an investigation into security at the Capitol complex following the riot.

"We must subject this whole complex to scrutiny," Pelosi said.

Pelosi, D-Calif., pointed to Honoré's experience responding to Hurricane Katrina and his knowledge of the Washington region. Various House committees are also gearing up investigations related to the Capitol Police and the response from the Defense Department and others to the insurrection.

Pelosi noted she has been in touch with the secretary of the Army and the head of U.S. Secret Service to ensure that all requests for reinforcements from the Capitol Police for security around the inauguration are met. She pointed out that for weeks the inauguration would be a smaller ceremony due to the coronavirus pandemic. "This is not a concession to the terrorists," she said. "It is a recognition of the danger of COVID."

The speaker said security needs should be based on intelligence from law enforcement, but "redundancy may be necessary," adding there should be "not too much, but enough" to meet possible threats.

Questions over allegations of some members' possible links

Pelosi, when asked about allegations that some members of Congress were potentially linked with those involved in the attack, said lawmakers have to trust that their colleagues respect each other and their oath of office.

"If, in fact, it is found that members of Congress were accomplices to this insurrection, if they aided and abetted the crime, then there have to be actions taken beyond the Congress and in terms of prosecution for that," she said. No evidence has been presented from those Democratic lawmakers making accusations about possible links from members to the extremists involved in the attack.

The speaker noted the swift action by the House of Representatives, voting to impeach Trump for one article of "incitement of insurrection" one week after the attack. Pelosi declined to answer when she would send the article of impeachment to the Senate to start the process of a trial.

Jacob Chansley, the "QAnon Shaman" known for his painted face and horned hat, was taken into custody in Arizona in connection with the assault on the U.S. Capitol on Jan 6. Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

Jacob Chansley, the "QAnon Shaman" known for his painted face and horned hat, was taken into custody in Arizona in connection with the assault on the U.S. Capitol on Jan 6.

Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

Updated at 3:05 p.m. ET

The top federal prosecutor for the District of Columbia said Friday that investigators have not uncovered direct evidence at this point of any "kill/capture teams" targeting elected officials during the U.S. Capitol insurrection, contradicting allegations made earlier by federal prosecutors in Arizona.

U.S. prosecutors in Arizona said Thursday in a court filing against Jacob Chansley, also known as the "QAnon Shaman," that they have "strong evidence" members of the pro-Trump mob wanted to "capture and assassinate" officials.

Michael Sherwin, acting U.S. attorney for the District of Columbia, attributed what he called the "disconnect" in Arizona, and at least one other district, to the sprawling and complex nature of the investigation. There are preliminary hearings taking place in districts across the United States.

"At some of those hearings, there were other prosecutors, there may be a disconnect, may be adding information that's not directly related to what we have," Sherwin said at a news conference.

''It's only a matter of time"

Chansley, the subject of the motion filed in Arizona, wore horns, face paint and fur on Jan. 6 as he stood on the Senate dais – where he left a threatening note for Vice President Pence, according to federal prosecutors in that state.

"It's only a matter of time, justice is coming," the handwritten note to Pence read, according to the court document. The note was left at the spot where, moments earlier, Pence had been poised to preside over a joint session to certify President-elect Joe Biden's victory over President Trump. Chansley told the FBI he believes Pence is a "child-trafficking traitor."

Chansley told investigators that he didn't mean the message to Pence as a threat.

"The Government strongly disagrees," prosecutors said.

The U.S. attorney's office in Arizona filed the memorandum Thursday as part of its argument against releasing Chansley while his case proceeds. He was slated to appear at a detention hearing Friday afternoon in Phoenix.

Chansley is charged with two felonies: obstructing the conduct of a law enforcement officer and obstructing an official proceeding. Prosecutors say that as he committed those actions, Chansley was also carrying a dangerous weapon – specifically, "a six-foot spear."

Prosecutors say Chansley should remain in custody for a variety of reasons, including his part in the riot and his avowed intent to return to Washington to protest Biden's upcoming inauguration.

"I'll still go, you better believe it," he is quoted telling the FBI. "For sure I'd want to be there, as a protestor, as a protestor, f***in' a."

The U.S. attorney's office also says that Chansley would not likely conform to court-imposed conditions on his release, noting that while in custody, he has refused to eat anything other than organic food. Prosecutors also note that Chansley has shown he can travel without being traced. And because he is widely associated with the horns-and-fur costume and face paint he wore at the Capitol, prosecutors say, Chansley "is virtually unidentifiable when not wearing it."

The memorandum, like other documents prosecutors have filed in Chansley's case, notes he refers to himself and other rioters as "patriots." The filing gives new details about how prosecutors view the insurrection – a term the U.S. attorney's office used repeatedly in its filing.

"Chansley has made himself the symbol of a radicalized insurrection movement, and has professed his intent to act in the future as he did at the Capitol on January 6," the memorandum says.

It notes Chansley's status as a "shaman" within QAnon, which the prosecutors variously define as "a dangerous extremist group ... founded on an imaginary conspiracy theory," and a cult that "preaches debunked and fictitious anti-government conspiracy theories that a deep state is out to take down the current administration."

Describing the threat it says the defendant poses, the memo says, "Strong evidence, including Chansley's own words and actions at the Capitol, supports that the intent of the Capitol rioters was to capture and assassinate elected officials in the United States Government. "

Chansley and dozens of others who breached security at the Capitol have been arrested in the past week. In many cases, they have been identified by citizens and authorities from photos and videos taken inside lawmakers' offices and other areas in the congressional complex.

The attack on the Capitol has been linked to five deaths, including U.S. Capitol Police Officer Brian Sicknick and a woman whom police shot as she tried to breach a barricaded door.

Federal prosecutors say insurrectionists' attempts to violently overthrow the U.S. government are not over, noting an increase in online rhetoric since Jan. 6 and stating, "Media and FBI reports have detailed carefully-planned insurrection attempts scheduled throughout the country in the coming weeks at every state capital, including the [Arizona] capitol."

Arguing that Chansley poses a flight risk, the court filing says he does not have a stable job that would require him to remain in Arizona. And because of Chansley's status within QAnon, the court filing says, he has "the ability to raise large sums of money for travel (and other activities) quickly through non-traditional means."

Was there coordination?

Federal prosecutors are also still working to determine whether there was premeditation or coordination among groups to storm the Capitol, Sherwin, the acting U.S. attorney for the District of Columbia, said Friday.

"There are bread crumbs of organization in terms of maybe what was taking place outside the Capitol and inside with perhaps some type of communication, with core groups of people ingressing into the Capitol and some coordinated activity of the individuals within the Capitol," Sherwin said.

"And that is a tier-one, top priority for both the U.S. attorney's office and federal law enforcement partners to see whether there was this overarching command and control, and whether there were these organized teams that were organized to breach the Capitol," Sherwin said.

He added that it's "going to take weeks, if not months, to find out the motivation of some of those groups."

NPR's Ryan Lucas contributed to this report.

A screenshot from the Jan. 6 U.S. Capitol insurrection allegedly shows gold medalist swimmer Klete Keller wearing an Olympic jacket. U.S. District Court hide caption

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U.S. District Court

A screenshot from the Jan. 6 U.S. Capitol insurrection allegedly shows gold medalist swimmer Klete Keller wearing an Olympic jacket.

U.S. District Court

Updated at 9:02 p.m. ET

Klete Keller, the Olympic gold medalist swimmer, is facing federal charges in connection with the insurrection last week at the U.S. Capitol.

He has been released from custody without posting bond but with orders to stay away from Washington, D.C., except for court hearings and to consult with his lawyers, according to The Associated Press. He appeared before a federal judge in Denver.

Keller faces three criminal counts, according to court documents filed Wednesday in U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia: obstructing law enforcement, knowingly entering a restricted building without lawful authority, and violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds.

In a separate case, authorities have arrested a retired firefighter, Robert Sanford of suburban Philadelphia, and charged him with assaulting Capitol Police officers with a fire extinguisher during the insurrection. This apparently is a different incident from the one that fatally injured Officer Brian Sicknick.

Keller's Colorado driver's license photo from 2019. U.S. District Court hide caption

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U.S. District Court

Keller's Colorado driver's license photo from 2019.

U.S. District Court

Keller, 38, was part of U.S. Olympic teams in 2000, 2004 and 2008. He is perhaps best known for holding off Australia's Ian Thorpe while swimming the anchor leg of the 4x200-meter freestyle at the 2004 Athens Olympics to help his team win by 0.13 seconds.

That relay team also included Michael Phelps and Ryan Lochte.

The FBI said Keller's jacket helped identify him. According to court documents, he was wearing a blue jacket with "USA" on the back and a "red and white Olympic patch on the front left side."

Investigators also noted Keller's striking height. He stands at 6 feet and 6 inches.

"PERSON 1 stands taller than a number of individuals around him and can clearly be seen as law enforcement officers repeatedly attempt to remove him and others from the Rotunda," the charging document filed by Special Agent Matthew Barofsky said.

A screenshot allegedly identifies Keller in the Rotunda during the U.S. Capitol insurrection. The FBI identified him in part because he was wearing a blue jacket with "USA" on the back, court documents say. U.S. District Court hide caption

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U.S. District Court

A screenshot allegedly identifies Keller in the Rotunda during the U.S. Capitol insurrection. The FBI identified him in part because he was wearing a blue jacket with "USA" on the back, court documents say.

U.S. District Court

Investigators said conservative news site Townhall Media posted a video of a crowd at the Capitol. Then outlets such as SwimSwam, which follows competitive swimming, said it appeared Keller was in the video, according to the charging documents.

Federal authorities said they confirmed his identification by comparing screenshots of Keller with the image from his driver's license from Colorado's Department of Motor Vehicles.

USA Swimming, the U.S. governing body of competitive swimming, said in a statement to its membership Wednesday that "while we respect private individuals' and groups' rights to peacefully protest, we strongly condemned the unlawful actions taken by those at the Capitol last week."

The U.S. men's 4x200-meter freestyle relay team members (from left) Peter Vanderkaay, Keller, Ryan Lochte and Michael Phelps celebrate after winning the gold medal at the World Swimming Championships in Melbourne, Australia, in 2007. Mark Baker/AP hide caption

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Mark Baker/AP

The U.S. men's 4x200-meter freestyle relay team members (from left) Peter Vanderkaay, Keller, Ryan Lochte and Michael Phelps celebrate after winning the gold medal at the World Swimming Championships in Melbourne, Australia, in 2007.

Mark Baker/AP

"It is very simple and very clear," USA Swimming said in the statement shared with NPR. "Mr. Keller's actions in no way represent the values or mission of USA Swimming. And while once a swimmer at the highest levels of our sport — representing the country and democracy he so willfully attacked — Mr. Keller has not been a member of this organization since 2008."

Keller reacts after a men's 4x200-meter freestyle relay heat during the swimming competitions at the 2008 Beijing Olympics. Thomas Kienzle/AP hide caption

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Thomas Kienzle/AP

Keller reacts after a men's 4x200-meter freestyle relay heat during the swimming competitions at the 2008 Beijing Olympics.

Thomas Kienzle/AP

Keller won five medals during his three Olympic appearances — two gold medals, one silver and two bronze.

Read the charging documents below:

NPR's Emily Bogle contributed to this report.

Robert Packer of Newport News, Va., appears Wednesday in a mug shot following his arrest on federal charges related to the riot at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6. Western Tidewater Regional Jail/AP hide caption

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Western Tidewater Regional Jail/AP

Robert Packer of Newport News, Va., appears Wednesday in a mug shot following his arrest on federal charges related to the riot at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6.

Western Tidewater Regional Jail/AP

One of the most enduring images of the assault on the U.S. Capitol was that of a long-haired, bearded man wearing a black sweatshirt with a skull and crossbones graphic and the words "Camp Auschwitz" in large letters.

The FBI, in an affidavit released prior to a court appearance Wednesday, identified him as Robert Packer, 56, of Newport News, Va.

Packer was arrested at his residence, according to the affidavit, and appeared Wednesday in a virtual hearing before U.S. Magistrate Judge Douglas Miller in Norfolk, Va. Packer faces two criminal counts: knowingly entering or remaining in any restricted building or grounds without lawful authority; and violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds.

The affidavit says that Packer was first identified by "media outlets" and that the FBI matched photographs taken at the Capitol with Packer's driver's license. The affidavit includes images of Packer both outside and inside the Capitol that had appeared on social media and on a British television network.

Camp Auschwitz refers to the complex of German labor and extermination camps in occupied Poland during World War II in which more than 1 million people were murdered, most of them Jews. Packer's sweatshirt also included the words "Work Brings Freedom," an inexact translation of the German slogan that was over the camp's entrance gate, "Arbeit Macht Frei."

Packer was released on his own recognizance, according to Norfolk NBC affiliate WAVY. He was not required to post bond but was ordered to stay away from Washington, D.C. He has a virtual court appearance scheduled for Jan. 19 in the U.S. District Court for D.C.

The acting U.S. attorney for the District of Columbia, Michael Sherwin, says hundreds of people are expected to be charged in connection with the assault on the Capitol.

The affidavit includes a Dec. 11 security camera photo of Packer wearing the same sweatshirt in a store near Newport News. An unidentified witness had contacted the FBI to say that Packer was a regular customer at the store. The witness did not know Packer's name.

National Guard troops are inside the U.S. Capitol Visitor Center to reinforce security Wednesday at the Capitol in Washington. It comes a week after an insurrection at the Capitol. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

National Guard troops are inside the U.S. Capitol Visitor Center to reinforce security Wednesday at the Capitol in Washington. It comes a week after an insurrection at the Capitol.

J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Updated 3:15 p.m. ET

Local and federal security officials expect about 20,000 National Guard members to be involved in securing Washington, D.C., for President-elect Joe Biden's inauguration next week.

"I think you can expect to see somewhere upwards of beyond 20,000 members of the National Guard that will be here in the footprint of the District of Columbia," Washington Metropolitan Police Chief Robert Contee said on Wednesday.

It represents an uptick in National Guard troops that will be deployed to the area. Army Times reported earlier this week that the Pentagon had authorized 15,000 National Guard members to be sent to the District for the inauguration.

Contee said the inauguration has been designated as a "national special security event," adding the final numbers of troops would come from the Secret Service and leaving open the possibility the numbers could fluctuate.

The exact number to be deployed is still being worked out by the Secret Service, the lead agency on inauguration security, and others, a U.S. official told NPR's Pentagon reporter Tom Bowman. The official, who requested anonymity because they were not authorized to speak to reporters, said the number of National Guard members to be deployed is up to 20,000.

The troops will be coming from nearly all states, Bowman reported, adding that only those who are either military police or have law enforcement experience will be armed.

Others will have access to their weapons but not carry them, and it remains unclear where the troops will deploy at the U.S. Capitol, according to the U.S. official.

President Trump issued a statement Wednesday urging supporters to commit "NO violence," citing unspecified reports on future demonstrations.

"In light of reports of more demonstrations, I urge that there must be NO violence, NO lawbreaking and NO vandalism of any kind," Trump said. "That is not what I stand for, and it is not what America stands for. I call on ALL Americans to help ease tensions and calm tempers. Thank You."

Presidential inaugurations are always massive security operations, but Biden's inauguration on Jan. 20 is facing heightened security concerns following last week's breach of the U.S. Capitol that left five people dead, including a Capitol Police officer.

These security moves come as the House of Representatives voted Wednesday to impeach President Trump a second time. The resolution charged him with "incitement of insurrection." National Guard troops are already patrolling the hallways of Congress, some carrying military assault rifles.

It was a startling reminder that just a week ago rioters attacked the building, overrunning Capitol Police in an attempt to block lawmakers from confirming Biden's Electoral College victory.

Since the siege, some members of Congress, including Rep. Jason Crow, D-Colo., an Iraq and Afghanistan veteran, have requested that Army Secretary Ryan McCarthy review backgrounds of any National Guard troops involved in inaugural security.

Crow tweeted over the weekend that he spoke with McCarthy and expressed "concerns about reports that active duty and reserve military members were involved in the insurrection."

Crow added that McCarthy said he "agreed to take additional measures."

Supporters of President Trump stormed the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6. Democratic Rep. Tim Ryan of Ohio says investigators are looking at "potentially members of Congress" who gave tours to rioters prior to the insurrection. Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

Supporters of President Trump stormed the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6. Democratic Rep. Tim Ryan of Ohio says investigators are looking at "potentially members of Congress" who gave tours to rioters prior to the insurrection.

Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

Rep. Tim Ryan, D-Ohio, says an investigation is underway looking at "potentially members of Congress" who gave tours to pro-Trump rioters prior to the insurrection last week on the U.S. Capitol.

"All of that is being reviewed, both people on the campus who were here and behavior before and after, a lot of videos floating around out there," Ryan told NPR's Michel Martin during NPR's special coverage of the House impeachment vote.

"That's all going to be considered, including anybody that may have been on the inside, including members of Congress."

Ryan, who chairs the Appropriations subcommittee that funds the Capitol Police and the sergeant-at-arms office, also told reporters on Capitol Hill on Wednesday morning that these alleged tours consisted of "handfuls" of people.

"You know, enough to be a group," he said. "It wasn't a one-on-one or a small family."

Rep. Mikie Sherrill, D-N.J., claimed during a Facebook Live broadcast Tuesday evening that some Republicans in Congress had given groups a "reconnaissance" tour of the Capitol ahead of the insurrection.

Sherrill's allegations came the same night that Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., addressed constituents on an Instagram Live video expressing her fear that some of her Republican colleagues would have disclosed her location during the insurrection on Jan. 6.

"I myself did not even feel safe going to that extraction point, because there were QAnon and white supremacist sympathizers and frankly white supremacist members of Congress in that extraction point, who I know and who I had felt would disclose my location and allow me to, who would create opportunities to allow me to be hurt, kidnapped, etc.," she said.

Neither Ryan nor Sherrill has released any names or provided proof, citing an ongoing investigation.

Ryan also told NPR's Martin that it's "shameful, glib and irresponsible" that some members of Congress have refused to walk through the newly installed metal detector in the House.

"To see members of Congress go around and push their way into the chamber without having to go through the magnetometer, you know, because they can, I think is a sign of how obnoxious things have become for some of these folks who are supporting Donald Trump," he said.

"The rules don't apply to them, whether it means wearing a mask like we saw the video when we were all jammed into a hearing room last week."

Many Democrats have criticized Republican lawmakers for refusing to wear masks while sheltering in place with colleagues during the Capitol lockdown. At least three Democratic members of Congress have since tested positive for the coronavirus.

Hollie Adams/Getty Images
Parler remained unavailable on Wednesday morning. Its app was also blocked by Google and Apple
Hollie Adams/Getty Images

Before Amazon took down Parler, the messaging app favored by far-right activists, Amazon says it flagged dozens of instance of violent and hateful posts that Parler "systematically failed" to remove.

The two companies are facing off in court after Amazon's decision to stop hosting Parler took the website offline on Monday. Parler remained unavailable on Wednesday morning. Its app was also blocked by Google and Apple.

Parler has sued Amazon Web Services, asking a federal judge in Seattle to issue a temporary restraining order to undo that. Parler's lawsuit alleges breach of contract and antitrust violations and compares its treatment with that of its competitor Twitter.

In a new filing, Amazon argues it was Parler that failed to abide by Amazon's terms of service, allowing hateful content to multiply on its platform even after last week's attack on the U.S. Capitol.

"This case is about Parler's demonstrated unwillingness and inability to remove from the servers of Amazon Web Services ... content that threatens the public safety, such as by inciting and planning the rape, torture, and assassination of named public officials and private citizens," Amazon wrote to the court.

"AWS notified Parler repeatedly that its content violated the parties' agreement, requested removal, and reviewed Parler's plan to address the problem, only to determine that Parler was both unwilling and unable to do so," Amazon added.

Amazon said that since November, it reported to Parler more than 100 instances of content promoting violence, including calls to hang, shoot or kill Black and Jewish people, lawmakers, tech CEOs, police officers and others.

During one of the calls, according to Amazon's filing, Parler's CEO reported a backlog of 26,000 reports of content that violated its community standards but remained posted.

Addressing Parler's comments about the treatment of Twitter, Amazon said it "does not host Twitter's feed" so "it could not have suspended access to Twitter's content." It added: "To be clear, AWS has no incentive to stop doing business with paying customers that comply with its agreements."

Parler is expected to file a response in the case soon. Its representatives did not immediately respond to inquiries about reports that they have found a new service to host the platform.

The case is Parler LLC v. Amazon Web Services, Inc before U.S. District Judge Barbara Rothstein in the Western District of Washington.

Editor's note: Amazon, Apple and Google are among NPR's recent financial supporters.

Airbnb said it is canceling reservations — and blocking new ones — in the D.C. area during the week that President-elect Joe Biden will be inaugurated. Martin Bureau/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Martin Bureau/AFP via Getty Images

Airbnb said it is canceling reservations — and blocking new ones — in the D.C. area during the week that President-elect Joe Biden will be inaugurated.

Martin Bureau/AFP via Getty Images

Updated at 11:28 a.m. ET

Airbnb says it is canceling reservations made in the Washington, D.C., metro area during inauguration week, citing various officials' requests that people not travel to the area during this time.

The service will also block new bookings in the area during that period. Airbnb says it will refund guests whose reservations were canceled and reimburse hosts for the money they would have earned from the canceled reservations.

"[D.C.] Mayor Bowser, [Maryland] Governor Hogan and [Virginia] Governor Northam have been clear that visitors should not travel to the D.C. Metro area for the Inauguration," the company said in a statement on Wednesday. "Additionally, we are aware of reports emerging yesterday afternoon regarding armed militias and known hate groups that are attempting to travel and disrupt the Inauguration."

Airbnb did not specify the precise dates the policy applies to, which also affects bookings on HotelTonight, which is owned by Airbnb.

The company said it has taken steps to "ensure hate group members are not part of the Airbnb community" — banning "numerous individuals" from using its platform if Airbnb has learned they "are either associated with known hate groups or otherwise involved in the criminal activity at the Capitol Building."

The move is likely to simplify matters for Airbnb hosts in the area. Neighborhood message boards in D.C. lit up in recent days with reports of shouting matches between pro-Trump Airbnb guests and D.C. neighbors, and of hosts hearing guests talking afterward about taking part in the riot.

Some neighbors urged D.C. Airbnb hosts to be careful who they rent to, while others cautioned hosts not to run afoul of nondiscrimination policies. Hosts noted that Airbnb typically penalizes those who cancel bookings.

On Monday, Airbnb said it was cross-referencing the Jan. 6 arrest logs of D.C. Metropolitan Police and reviewing reservations in the D.C. area.

"Members of hate groups are never welcome on Airbnb," the company said, and reminded hosts that if they suspect violations of this policy, they can notify Airbnb's safety line. The company also linked to a neighbor support line where community members can bring issues to Airbnb's attention.

January 13

New York City Cancels Contracts With Trump Organization

New York City Cancels Contracts With Trump Organization

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The contract for Wollman Ice Rink in New York City's Central Park is operated by the Trump Organization and among those that will be terminated by the city. Mark Lennihan/AP hide caption

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Mark Lennihan/AP

The contract for Wollman Ice Rink in New York City's Central Park is operated by the Trump Organization and among those that will be terminated by the city.

Mark Lennihan/AP

Mayor Bill de Blasio said Wednesday that in light of President Trump's role in last week's insurrection at the U.S. Capitol, New York City is cutting its business ties with the president's company.

"The President incited a rebellion against the United States government that killed five people and threatened to derail the constitutional transfer of power," de Blasio said in a statement. "The City of New York will not be associated with those unforgivable acts in any shape, way or form, and we are immediately taking steps to terminate all Trump Organization contracts."

The Trump Organization, made up of hundreds of businesses owned by the president, has three contracts to run concessions in New York City: the Central Park Carousel, the Wollman and Lasker skating rinks, and Ferry Point Golf Course. The attractions bring the company $17 million a year, according to The Washington Post.

"In light of last week's attack on our Capitol and our democracy, we have concluded that it is in the best interests of New Yorkers for the City to commence the process of cancelling these contracts and terminating its business ties with the Trump Organization," corporation counsel James Johnson said in the statement from the mayor's office.

The statement said the contracts' termination clauses are somewhat different. Termination of the carousel contract occurs after 25 days' written notice; termination of the ice rink contracts requires 30 days' notice; termination of the golf course contract is more complex "and is expected to take a number of months."

Trump, a Queens native whose name appears in glittering block letters on high-priced Manhattan real estate, has long had a contentious relationship with his hometown. His conservative politics and policies clash with the more liberal bent of New York City. And when it comes to taxes, Trump has often been accused of skimping on his payments to the state of New York.

Trump and first lady Melania Trump filed paperwork in 2019 to make Florida their primary residence, and when they did so Democratic New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo tweeted, "Good riddance. It's not like @realDonaldTrump paid taxes here anyway... He's all yours, Florida."

An investigation published last fall by The New York Times showed that for many of the years leading up to his presidency, Trump paid nothing in federal income taxes and only $750 the year he won the election. Still, despite promising he would do so, Trump has not yet released his personal returns and instead continues to loudly trumpet his protestations he pays millions.

In New York, Trump is the subject of ongoing investigations into fraud, a criminal investigation by the Manhattan District Attorney's Office and a civil investigation by the New York State Attorney General's Office.

After the events of last week, Trump's financial problems have multiplied quickly.

A growing list of major businesses have announced plans to pause or sever their ties with Trump. The PGA of America canceled its plans to hold the 2022 PGA Championship at the Trump National Golf Club in Bedminster, N.J. Stripe, a tech company that processes credit card transactions, has stopped processing donations to Trump campaign committees, according to The Associated Press.

And Deutsche Bank, which has $340 million in outstanding loans to the Trump Organization personally guaranteed by the president, has also said it will no longer do business with Trump, according to The Times.

Christiana Riley, CEO of the bank's U.S. operations, took to LinkedIn to express her concern over the violent events at the Capitol.

"[Jan. 6] was a dark day for America and our democracy," Riley wrote. "Violence has no place in our society and the scenes that we witnessed are a shame on the whole nation. We are proud of our Constitution and stand by those who seek to uphold it to ensure that the will of the people is upheld and a peaceful transition of power takes place."

An earlier version of this story was published Jan. 12, 2021, reporting that New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio was considering termination of the city's contracts with the Trump Organization.

YouTube is the latest social media company to shut down President Trump's account following the riots at the U.S. Capitol. Martin Bureau /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Martin Bureau /AFP via Getty Images

YouTube is the latest social media company to shut down President Trump's account following the riots at the U.S. Capitol.

Martin Bureau /AFP via Getty Images

YouTube, citing "the ongoing potential for violence," has suspended President Trump's account for at least a week.

The social media platform is the latest to take action against Trump following a riot at the U.S. Capitol last week organized by the president's supporters. The attack forced lawmakers into hiding and resulted in the deaths of five people, including an officer of the Capitol Police.

As the nation prepares for President-elect Joe Biden's inauguration next week, law enforcement officials have said there are credible threats of more acts of violence from supporters of Trump.

The suspension of Trump's channel came after comments the president made at a news conference on Tuesday that streamed on the platform.

"People thought that what I said was totally appropriate," Trump said Tuesday. He took no responsibility for inciting the unrest.

In accordance with the site's "strike system," Trump's channel is prevented from uploading new videos or livestreams for a minimum of seven days, which could be extended.

A first strike for a YouTube account leads to a one-week suspension, a second strike results in a two-week suspension, and a third strike will result in channel termination.

"After careful review, and in light of concerns about the ongoing potential for violence, we removed new content uploaded to the Donald J. Trump channel and issued a strike for violating our policies for inciting violence," a YouTube spokesperson told NPR.

"We are also indefinitely disabling comments under videos on the channel, we've taken similar actions in the past for other cases involving safety concerns," the spokesperson added.

Twitter and Facebook removed Trump's accounts following the clash at the U.S. Capitol and have taken down content supporting last week's siege. Amazon, Google and Apple have also removed the Parler app, which is reportedly used by many of Trump's supporters.

The site also removed other content uploaded Tuesday.

Editor's note: Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Google are among NPR's recent financial supporters.

Insurrection At The Capitol: Live Updates

Shockwaves after pro-Trump rioters stormed the U.S. Capitol complex