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In central Appalachia, the black lung rate for working coal miners with at least 25 years experience underground is the highest it's been in a quarter century. Don Klumpp/Getty Images hide caption

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Don Klumpp/Getty Images

A roof bolter secures the roof of a newly mined section of a coal mine. Studies show roof bolters sometimes have high exposure to the silica dust that is especially toxic to lungs. Thorney Lieberman/Getty Images hide caption

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Thorney Lieberman/Getty Images

U.S. Army soldiers pass out water, provided by FEMA, to residents in a neighborhood without grid electricity or running water in San Isidro, Puerto Rico, on Oct. 17, 2017. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

James Meadours delivers the keynote address at a summit in New Jersey to propose reforms to prevent sexual abuse of people with intellectual disabilities. Meadours, a rape survivor with an intellectual disability, travels the country to raise awareness. Joseph Shapiro/NPR hide caption

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Joseph Shapiro/NPR

States Aim To Halt Sexual Abuse Of People With Intellectual Disabilities

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U.S. Army soldiers in Puerto Rico unload food on Oct. 17, 2017. Nearly a month after Hurricane Maria hit, the federal government was still delivering basic supplies, like food and water. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

FEMA Blamed Delays In Puerto Rico On Maria; Agency Records Tell Another Story

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Sheralin Greene, 57, mined coal for 20 years. She now suffers paralyzing coughing fits from black lung and receives payments and medical care from the federal trust fund. Courtesy of Sheralin Greene hide caption

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Courtesy of Sheralin Greene

The rate of the advanced stage of the deadly disease black lung is growing in central Appalachia, according to a new study. Tyler Stableford/Getty Images hide caption

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Tyler Stableford/Getty Images

New Studies Confirm A Surge In Coal Miners' Disease

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Alicia Nichols holds her daughter Diana in her home in February. After the birth of Diana, Nichols suffered unusual postpartum blood loss that she feels was not taken seriously by her doctor. Kayana Szymczak for NPR hide caption

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Kayana Szymczak for NPR

For Every Woman Who Dies In Childbirth In The U.S., 70 More Come Close

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Jaime Degraff sits outside on Sept. 23, 2017, as he waits for the Puerto Rican electrical grid to be fixed after Hurricane Maria. The island is still struggling with power outages. Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press hide caption

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Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press

How Puerto Rico's Debt Created A Perfect Storm Before The Storm

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David Zatezalo, the Assistant Secretary of Labor for Mine Safety and Health, was asked about the advanced black lung epidemic at a congressional hearing in Washington, D.C., on Feb. 6, 2018. Huo Jingnan/NPR hide caption

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Huo Jingnan/NPR

Black Lung Study Finds Biggest Cluster Ever Of Fatal Coal Miners' Disease

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Under sweeping new recommendations from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, doctors would see new mothers sooner and more frequently, and insurers would cover the increased visits. FatCamera/Getty Images hide caption

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FatCamera/Getty Images

A new study offers a systematic look at what midwives can and can't do in different states, offering evidence that empowering them could boost maternal and infant health. Trina Dalziel/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Trina Dalziel/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Florida state Sen. Gary Farmer speaks during the 2017 session in Tallahassee, Fla. He has introduced a new bill that would eliminate the false identity provision and clarify the statute so that it applies only to people who commit traditional workers' comp fraud, such as lying about injuries or eligibility for benefits. Steve Cannon/AP hide caption

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Steve Cannon/AP

Pauline stands in her room after coming home from a day program for adults with intellectual disabilities. Michelle Gustafson for NPR hide caption

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Michelle Gustafson for NPR

The Sexual Assault Epidemic No One Talks About

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Patricia (from left), Natalie and their mother, Rosemary, sit in their home in Northern California. Natalie, a woman with an intellectual disability, is unable to speak. She couldn't explain what was wrong and doctors couldn't figure out why she was in pain. Talia Herman for NPR hide caption

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Talia Herman for NPR

'She Can't Tell Us What's Wrong'

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James Meadours (left), Debbie Robinson and Thomas Mangrum share their stories about sexual assault. Lizzie Chen for NPR; Claire Harbage and Meg Anderson/NPR hide caption

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Lizzie Chen for NPR; Claire Harbage and Meg Anderson/NPR

In Their Own Words: People With Intellectual Disabilities Talk About Rape

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An NPR investigation finds that people with intellectual disabilities suffer one of the highest rates of sexual assault — and that compared with other rape victims, they are even more likely to be assaulted by someone they know. Cornelia Li for NPR hide caption

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Cornelia Li for NPR

From The Frontlines Of A Sexual Assault Epidemic: 2 Therapists Share Stories

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Lyons-Boswick goes to Veterans Courthouse in Newark to have a judge sign off on a warrant she needs to prosecute a sexual assault case. Cassandra Giraldo for NPR hide caption

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Cassandra Giraldo for NPR

How Prosecutors Changed The Odds To Start Winning Some Of The Toughest Rape Cases

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A participant helps Park hang the agenda on the wall at the start of class. Brianna Soukup for NPR hide caption

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Brianna Soukup for NPR

For Some With Intellectual Disabilities, Ending Abuse Starts With Sex Ed

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Leah Bahrencu, 35, of Austin, Texas, developed an infection after an emergency C-section to deliver twins Lukas and Sorana, now 11 months. Ilana Panich-Linsman hide caption

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Ilana Panich-Linsman

Wanda Irving holds her granddaughter, Soleil, in front of a portrait of Soleil's mother, Shalon, at her home in Sandy Springs, Ga. Wanda is raising Soleil since Shalon died of complications due to hypertension a few weeks after giving birth. Becky Harlan/NPR hide caption

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Becky Harlan/NPR

Black Mothers Keep Dying After Giving Birth. Shalon Irving's Story Explains Why

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Millions of Americans struggle to afford their rent and most don't get any help at all. In Dallas, the city and a prominent landlord are the latest moving pieces in this problem. Allison V. Smith for KERA hide caption

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Allison V. Smith for KERA

Choosing Between Squalor Or The Street: Housing Without Government Aid

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