Investigations Read the latest from NPR's investigative team. If you have solid tips or documents on stories we should probe, please send them to us.

Investigations

The CDC's early coronavirus test was poorly designed, and it also came with problematic instructions, NPR has learned. Jessica McGowan/Getty Images hide caption

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Jessica McGowan/Getty Images

Los Angeles County + USC Medical Center is one of the largest safety-net hospitals in the United States. Bing Guan/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bing Guan/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Hospitals Serving The Poor Struggled During COVID. Wealthy Hospitals Made Millions

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A new report says a division within the Department of Homeland Security missed signs of potential violence before the insurrection at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6. Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images hide caption

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Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

Report: DHS Division Failed To Analyze Intelligence Ahead Of Capitol Violence

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National Rifle Association CEO Wayne LaPierre at the group's annual meeting in Dallas in May 2018. A secretive figure, LaPierre makes few public appearances outside of carefully scripted speeches. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Judge Dismisses NRA Bankruptcy Case, Heightening Risk For Dissolution Of Group

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A U.S. Capitol Police officer stands guard outside the Capitol ahead of the inauguration for President Biden on Jan. 20. Yegor Aleyev/Tass via Getty Images hide caption

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Yegor Aleyev/Tass via Getty Images

'The Worst I've Seen': Capitol Police Face Scrutiny For Lack Of Transparency

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Anne Neuberger, the deputy national security adviser for cyber and emerging technology, says an upcoming executive order will strengthen U.S. cybersecurity, from setting up new ways to investigate cyberattacks to developing standards for software. Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

Biden Order To Require New Cybersecurity Standards In Response To SolarWinds Attack

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The Department of Justice released videos depicting the alleged assault on Capitol Police Officer Brian Sicknick and other members of law enforcement during the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol. Department of Justice/NPR hide caption

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Department of Justice/NPR

In this 2017 photo, Gavin McInnes (center), founder of the far-right extremist group known as the Proud Boys, is surrounded by supporters after speaking at a rally in Berkeley, Calif. McInnes told NPR that the group is made up of "funny dudes, not Nazis." At least 25 members of the far-right group are facing charges related to the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP hide caption

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Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP

How Extremists Weaponize Irony To Spread Hate

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Clockwise from top left: Tristen Hunter, Ethan Harvey, Malerie McClusky, Katrina Edwards, Mateo Jaime and Alex Carter. Ash Adams for NPR hide caption

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Ash Adams for NPR

State Foster Care Agencies Take Millions Of Dollars Owed To Children In Their Care

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In a letter to the White House, 24 senators said the U.S. military prison at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba "has damaged America's reputation, fueled anti-Muslim bigotry, and weakened the United States' ability to counter terrorism and fight for human rights and the rule of law around the world." Maren Hennemuth/picture alliance via Getty Images hide caption

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Maren Hennemuth/picture alliance via Getty Images

Senators Urge Biden To Shut Down Guantánamo, Calling It A 'Symbol Of Lawlessness'

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An NPR investigation into the SolarWinds attack reveals a hack unlike any other, launched by a sophisticated adversary intent on exploiting the soft underbelly of our digital lives. Zoë van Dijk for NPR hide caption

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Zoë van Dijk for NPR

A 'Worst Nightmare' Cyberattack: The Untold Story Of The SolarWinds Hack

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The FBI has released a substantial amount of information, including surveillance video, about the unidentified bomb-maker. FBI/screenshot by NPR hide caption

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FBI/screenshot by NPR

What We Know About The Suspect Who Planted Bombs Before The Capitol Riot

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Pro-Trump rioters, including members of the far-right extremist group the Proud Boys, gather near the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6. At least 25 people charged in the attack appear to have links to the Proud Boys, according to court documents. Jon Cherry/Getty Images hide caption

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Jon Cherry/Getty Images

Conspiracy Charges Bring Proud Boys' History Of Violence Into Spotlight

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Alex Jones addresses a pro-Trump crowd on Jan. 6, the day of the U.S. Capitol riot. Jones is widely known for his support of baseless and often bigoted conspiracy theories, and he has been banned from many tech platforms, though not Amazon. Jon Cherry/Getty Images hide caption

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Jon Cherry/Getty Images

Alex Jones Still Sells Supplements On Amazon Despite Bans From Other Platforms

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Pro-Trump extremists clashed with police during the storming of the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6. The rioters may not have fired shots, but many were armed with other weapons, court documents show. Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images

Yes, Capitol Rioters Were Armed. Here Are The Weapons Prosecutors Say They Used

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After the Jan. 6 U.S. Capitol riot, big tech companies accelerated a process of "deplatforming," or removing the right of extremists to use their technology. But the far-right is quickly adjusting to this reality. Tracy J. Lee for NPR hide caption

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Tracy J. Lee for NPR

Across The Internet, A Game Of Whac-A-Mole Is Underway To Root Out Extremism

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A college student charged in the Jan. 6 riot "openly posted calls for America to become a whites-only nation," according to the FBI. Who was he on campus? Yifan Wu for NPR hide caption

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Yifan Wu for NPR

UCLA Student Charged In Capitol Riot Took Inspiration From Online Extremist

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ISIS and domestic extremism in the U.S. are driven by very different ideologies, but the process by which young people are radicalized is remarkably similar. Nicole Xu for NPR hide caption

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Nicole Xu for NPR

A Tale Of 2 Radicalizations

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Stickers reading "Fck Antifa" are stuck on a broken window at the U.S. Capitol after the building was breached by rioters on Jan. 6. Graeme Sloan/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Graeme Sloan/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Antifa Didn't Storm The Capitol. Just Ask The Rioters.

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Rep. James Clyburn, pictured last October, is chairman of the House Select Subcommittee on the Coronavirus Crisis, which is launching its own investigation into One Medical's vaccine practices. Michael A. McCoy/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael A. McCoy/Pool/Getty Images

One Medical's Coronavirus Vaccine Practices Spark Congressional Investigation

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Bruno Cua, 18, is allegedly seen here with his back to the camera, holding a tan jacket. Prosecutors say he entered the Senate Chamber of the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6 with a handful of other rioters. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Concierge health care provider One Medical allowed patients who were not eligible — and those with connections to the company's leadership — to skip the COVID-19 vaccine line ahead of high-risk patients. Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images hide caption

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Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images

High-End Medical Provider Let Ineligible People Skip COVID-19 Vaccine Line

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