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Investigations

Concierge health care provider One Medical allowed patients who were not eligible — and those with connections to the company's leadership — to skip the COVID-19 vaccine line ahead of high-risk patients. Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images hide caption

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Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images

High-End Medical Provider Let Ineligible People Skip COVID-19 Vaccine Line

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A demonstrator wears an Oath Keepers anti-government organization badge on a tactical vest during a protest outside the Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., on Jan. 5, 2021. Stefani Reynolds/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Stefani Reynolds/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Federal prosecutors allege Leo Brent Bozell IV took part in the rioting at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6. The government says it identified him through his blue sweatshirt, which featured the logo for a small Christian school in Pennsylvania that witnesses say his children attended. U.S. Department of Justice hide caption

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U.S. Department of Justice
Department of Justice/NPR

The Capitol Siege: The Arrested And Their Stories

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Ruth Talbot/NPR

Across The South, COVID-19 Vaccine Sites Missing From Black And Hispanic Neighborhoods

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Gen. Paul Nakasone, the National Security Agency director, told NPR ahead of the 2020 elections that the U.S. was "going to expand our insights of our adversaries. ... We're going to know our adversaries better than they know themselves." Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Why Russia May Have Stepped Up Its Hacking Game

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Demonstrators raise their arms and chant, "Hands up, don't shoot," in August 2014 as they protest the shooting death of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Fatal Police Shootings Of Unarmed Black People Reveal Troubling Patterns

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Larry Rendall Brock Jr., an Air Force veteran, is seen inside the Senate Chamber wearing a military-style helmet and tactical vest during the rioting at the U.S. Capitol. Federal prosecutors have alleged that before the attack, Brock posted on Facebook about an impending "Second Civil War." Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Nearly 1 In 5 Defendants In Capitol Riot Cases Served In The Military

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"People will not be subject to age or disability discrimination when the going gets tough," Roger Severino, the director of the Office of Civil Rights at the Department of Health and Human Services, told NPR. Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images hide caption

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Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images

When law enforcement officials failed to anticipate that pro-Trump supporters would devolve into a violent mob, they fell victim to what one expert calls "the invisible obvious." He said it was hard for authorities to see that people who looked like them could want to commit this kind of violence. Roberto Schmidt/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Roberto Schmidt/AFP via Getty Images

Why Didn't The FBI And DHS Produce A Threat Report Ahead of The Capitol Insurrection?

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Fox Business host Lou Dobbs suggested Republicans who voted to certify President-elect Joe Biden's win were "criminal." John Lamparski/Getty Images hide caption

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John Lamparski/Getty Images

After Deadly Capitol Riot, Fox News Stays Silent On Stars' Incendiary Rhetoric

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Ernestine Mann, here in a family photo, moved into the Arbor Terrace at Cascade assisted living facility in Atlanta in 2019. Mann was one of the residents who died of COVID-19 this year when there was an outbreak at the facility. Lynsey Weatherspoon for NPR hide caption

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Lynsey Weatherspoon for NPR

In Atlanta, A Wave Of Coronavirus Deaths And The Questions Left In Its Wake

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For the 78 residents of St. Joseph's Senior Home in New Jersey, the arrival of hazmat-suited officials in March in their caravan of ambulance buses was terrifying. Some evacuees with dementia shouted and furiously clawed at them. Others begged not to be taken away. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

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Seth Wenig/AP

The Tragedy Of 'St. Joe's'

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Recycled plastic pellets are displayed at a facility in Ontario. James MacDonald/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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James MacDonald/Bloomberg/Getty Images

Big Oil Evaded Regulation And Plastic Pellets Kept Spilling

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Masks hang from an IV pole at a hospital. Jenny Kane/AP hide caption

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Jenny Kane/AP

Oregon Hospitals Didn't Have Shortages. So Why Were Disabled People Denied Care?

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President Trump speaks in April about the Paycheck Protection Program. From left are Jovita Carranza, head of the Small Business Administration; Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin; and adviser Ivanka Trump. Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Scores Of Private Charitable Foundations Got Paycheck Protection Program Money

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Kimberly Conger, Sarah McSweeney's nurse at her group home, shows a photo of McSweeney on her phone. She says McSweeney was outgoing and fun: "She absolutely adored going into malls and getting her makeup done and getting her hair done." Celeste Noche for NPR hide caption

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Celeste Noche for NPR

As Hospitals Fear Being Overwhelmed By COVID-19, Do The Disabled Get The Same Access?

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A lab technician for the company Co-Diagnostics prepares components for a coronavirus test in March in Salt Lake City. The company has come under scrutiny regarding its tests' accuracy and stock sales by leadership at the company. Rick Bowmer/AP hide caption

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Rick Bowmer/AP

Stock Sales By Leaders At Coronavirus Testing Company Raise Legal Concerns

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An error at the IRS caused thousands of non-Americans living overseas to mistakenly receive $1,200 stimulus checks last spring. Miami Herald/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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Miami Herald/TNS via Getty Images

IRS Says Its Own Error Sent $1,200 Stimulus Checks To Non-Americans Overseas

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Used N95 masks are collected at Boston's Massachusetts General Hospital on April 13. Hospital staff members wrote their names on the masks so each could be returned after being cleaned, a strategy used to alleviate critical shortages of respirator masks. Blake Nissen/Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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Blake Nissen/Boston Globe via Getty Images

A Revamped Strategic National Stockpile Still Can't Match The Pandemic's Latest Surge

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An American Airlines plane is seen at a gate at Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport in Arlington, Va., on May 12, 2020. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images