Archived Topic: Iraq Archived Topic: Iraq

Archived Topic: Iraq

Then-U.S. ambassador to Iraq Christopher Hill (right) tours the Mosul Museum of History in May 2009. This week the self-declared Islamic State posted a video online that showed militants going through the museum, pushing over statues and smashing artifacts with sledgehammers. Mujahed Mohammed/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mujahed Mohammed/AFP/Getty Images

Construction workers at the Erbil Citadel, which was named a UNESCO World Heritage Site last year. Ari Shapiro/NPR hide caption

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Ari Shapiro/NPR

After 6,000 Years, Time For A Renovation At Iraq's Citadel

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ISIS Video Shows Extremists Destroying Artifacts

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ISIS's 'Jihadi John' Revealed As Londoner Born In Kuwait

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An Iraqi child who fled fighting between the so-called Islamic State and Kurdish peshmerga is among the some 3,000 people living at the Baharka camp, near Irbil, the capital of the Kurdish autonomous region in northern Iraq, on Jan. 16. Safin Hamed/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Safin Hamed/AFP/Getty Images

Brutal ISIS Tactics Create New Levels Of Trauma Among Iraqis

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Training at a new camp near the front line, a mix of Arabs and Kurds prepare for an assault on Mosul in upcoming months. The men will wear balaclavas to conceal their identities while they fight, because they have family in Mosul and don't want to put their relatives at risk. Ari Shapiro/NPR hide caption

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Ari Shapiro/NPR

From A Mountain, Kurds Keep Watch On ISIS In Mosul

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Iraq is preparing to take back Mosul, a senior U.S. military official says. Earlier this month, government-backed Sunni Arab tribesmen who've been training to fight ISIS marched northeast of Mosul, in northern Iraq. Yaser Jawad/Xinhua /Landov hide caption

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Yaser Jawad/Xinhua /Landov

U.S.: Major Offensive Planned Against ISIS In Mosul This Spring

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Iranian Jewish men read from the Torah scroll during morning prayers at Youssef Abad Synagogue in Tehran in 2013. Behrouz Mehri/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Behrouz Mehri/AFP/Getty Images

Iran's Jews: It's Our Home And We Plan To Stay

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Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush answers questions Wednesday after speaking to the Chicago Council on Global Affairs. The likely 2016 presidential candidate says he will be guided by his own thinking and experiences when it comes to foreign policy questions. M. Spencer Green/AP hide caption

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M. Spencer Green/AP

Hedieh Mirahmadi (from left) of the World Organization for Resource Development and Education; Paris Mayor Anne Hidalgo; and Vilvoorde, Belgium, Mayor Hans Bonte greet each other at the White House Summit on Countering Violent Extremism. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

The heightened partisanship cemented in congressional districts has created havens for both Democrats and Republicans, whose job security now often depends more on pleasing primary voters than on the high-altitude questions facing the nation at large. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Iraqi Sheikh's Murder Sparks Outrage From Sunnis

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Just 55 Miles From ISIS Control, American Expats Carry On Life As Usual

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