Follow The Money : It's All Politics If you want to know which way the political winds are blowing, it helps to know which way the campaign cash is flowing. We keep an eye on developments in the post Citizens United era.

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Follow The Money

A volunteer with the Koch-funded Libre Initiative directs people in 2014 as groceries are distributed at a food bank it partially sponsors in San Antonio. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush poses with supporters for photos during a fundraiser in May. Alan Diaz/AP hide caption

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Alan Diaz/AP

Billionaire Or Bust: Who Are Rich Backers Lining Up With?

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Candidates, and "un-candidates," for the presidency are slicing and dicing campaign-finance law, testing the boundaries of what's legal. TaxCredits.net via Flickr hide caption

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TaxCredits.net via Flickr

Hillary Clinton speaks to the media after keynoting a Women's Empowerment Event at the United Nations on Tuesday in New York City. Clinton answered questions about recent allegations of an improperly used email account during her tenure as secretary of state. Yana Paskova/Getty Images hide caption

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Yana Paskova/Getty Images

President Obama walks to the podium at his 2008 nominating convention. Lawmakers are inserting into the spending bill a provision allowing political parties to collect up to $97,200 from each donor to pay for their conventions. Chuck Kennedy,Scott Andrews/AP hide caption

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Chuck Kennedy,Scott Andrews/AP

In Spending Bill, A Gift For Political Party Fundraising

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President Obama, is watched by Mark Miller, back second from left, Ellyn Miller, and their son Jake Miller, left, as he signs the Gabriella Miller Kids First Research Act, into law in the Oval Office this spring. The Democratic and Republican parties complained to the Federal Election Commission that the law took away public funding for their political conventions. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

Republican strategist Karl Rove's Crossroads GPS group is planning to spend at least $23 million in key Senate races in the final two months of the campaign. The group is a tax-exempt non-profit and is allowed to keep the names of its donors secret. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP