In Or Out In Congress? Gyrocopters, Tweets To Iran, Downton Abbey : It's All Politics In Congress, just like at any storied American institution — McDonald's, New York Fashion Week, the Bush and Clinton families — trends come and go.
NPR logo In Or Out In Congress? Gyrocopters, Tweets To Iran, Downton Abbey

In Or Out In Congress? Gyrocopters, Tweets To Iran, Downton Abbey

An explosive ordnance disposal technician checks the gyrocopter that landed on the Capitol's South Lawn Wednesday. Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images

An explosive ordnance disposal technician checks the gyrocopter that landed on the Capitol's South Lawn Wednesday.

Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images

In Congress, just like at any storied American institution — McDonald's, New York Fashion Week, the Bush and Clinton families — trends come and go.

The 114th Congress is now 100 days old. And it can be difficult to keep up with the goings and comings of the body and its 535 members — the negotiations, visits from world leaders, the scandals and, oh yeah, the legislation.

So here's our look at what's in and what's out on Capitol Hill:

IN

  • Benjamin Netanyahu

    Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu is greeted by members of Congress before speaking to a joint meeting in the House chamber. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

    toggle caption
    Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

    Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu is greeted by members of Congress before speaking to a joint meeting in the House chamber.

    Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

    Netanyahu's address to a joint meeting of Congress caused weeks of controversy after Speaker John Boehner invited him, but didn't tell the White House. Though several Democrats protested the speech, Netanyahu spoke to a packed house.

  • Gyrocopter

    An explosive ordnance disposal technician checks the gyrocopter that landed on the Capitol's South Lawn Wednesday. Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

    toggle caption
    Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images

    An explosive ordnance disposal technician checks the gyrocopter that landed on the Capitol's South Lawn Wednesday.

    Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images

    The Capitol was on lockdown Wednesday as a postman flew a gyrocopter into the Capitol airspace and landed it on the South Lawn to protest money in politics. Douglas Hughes of Florida was taken into custody and charged with violating aircraft registration requirements and violating national defense airspace. He faces a preliminary hearing May 8.

  • Doc Fix

    The signatures of House Speaker John Boehner and Sen. Orrin Hatch on the Medicare Access CHIP Reauthorization Act 2015. Getty Images hide caption

    toggle caption
    Getty Images

    The signatures of House Speaker John Boehner and Sen. Orrin Hatch on the Medicare Access CHIP Reauthorization Act 2015.

    Getty Images

    On Thursday, the House approved a long-term resolution to set the way doctors who accept Medicare are paid. It had been a perennial issue. The New York Times calls it "the most significant bipartisan policy legislation to pass through that chamber since Republicans regained a majority in 2011."

  • Bipartisan Iran Nuclear Agreement Review Act of 2015

    Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Sen. Bob Corker (left) confers with ranking member Sen. Ben Cardin during a committee markup meeting on the proposed nuclear agreement with Iran. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

    toggle caption
    Win McNamee/Getty Images

    Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Sen. Bob Corker (left) confers with ranking member Sen. Ben Cardin during a committee markup meeting on the proposed nuclear agreement with Iran.

    Win McNamee/Getty Images

    The bill means the administration must formally submit to Congress the final Iran nuclear agreement. It's bipartisan, it passed, and the president has agreed to sign it.

  • Tweeting Iran's Leaders

    Sen. Tom Cotton's tweet to Iran's President Rouhani. Twitter hide caption

    toggle caption
    Twitter

    Sen. Tom Cotton's tweet to Iran's President Rouhani.

    Twitter

    Sen. Tom Cotton led 46 other senators in writing a letter to Iran's leaders explaining that they "may not fully understand our constitutional system." He said he didn't actually mail the letter, but he did tweet it to President Rouhani (@hassanrouhani).

  • Diversity

    Utah Rep. Mia Love. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

    toggle caption
    Mark Wilson/Getty Images

    Utah Rep. Mia Love.

    Mark Wilson/Getty Images

    Rep. Mia Love is part of the largest class of black Republicans in Congress since Reconstruction. Overall, 17 percent of the 114th Congress is nonwhite, the largest portion ever. Still, that's lower than the 37 percent of the nonwhite population overall in the country.

  • Regular Order

    "We need to get committees working again. We need to recommit to a rational, functioning appropriations process," Sen. Mitch McConnell said on the first full day of the new Congress. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

    toggle caption
    Susan Walsh/AP

    "We need to get committees working again. We need to recommit to a rational, functioning appropriations process," Sen. Mitch McConnell said on the first full day of the new Congress.

    Susan Walsh/AP

    Sens. Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., John McCain, R-Ariz., Ben Cardin, D-Md., and others have called for the glorious return of regular order. Those are the rules and customs of Congress, according to Roll Call, that "constitute an orderly and deliberative policymaking process."

  • Reconciliation, In The Budget Sense

    Reconciliation, like ladders in the popular game, can catapult legislation to the finish line in the Senate by requiring a simple majority vote rather than the usual 60. Ben Husmann/Flickr hide caption

    toggle caption
    Ben Husmann/Flickr

    Reconciliation, like ladders in the popular game, can catapult legislation to the finish line in the Senate by requiring a simple majority vote rather than the usual 60.

    Ben Husmann/Flickr

    It's a procedural fast track that could allow Republicans to get sweeping legislation through the Senate with a simple majority, as NPR's Ailsa Chang reports. For actual, bipartisan reconciliation, "the restoration of friendly relations," see the Out list.

OUT

  • Offices Modeled After Downton Abbey

    Media members gather outside the office of Rep. Aaron Schock after he announced his resignation from Congress on March 17. Lauren Victoria Burke/AP hide caption

    toggle caption
    Lauren Victoria Burke/AP

    Media members gather outside the office of Rep. Aaron Schock after he announced his resignation from Congress on March 17.

    Lauren Victoria Burke/AP

    Rep. Aaron Schock resigned after reports of lavish spending, including $40,000 to decorate his Capitol Hill office like the PBS show. Probably not out: TMI Instagram feeds and fudged mileage reports.

  • Regular Order

    When Mitch McConnell became Senate majority leader, he promised he would restore what he called regular order in that chamber. But Democrats have been accusing him of violating regular order ever since. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

    toggle caption
    Susan Walsh/AP

    When Mitch McConnell became Senate majority leader, he promised he would restore what he called regular order in that chamber. But Democrats have been accusing him of violating regular order ever since.

    Susan Walsh/AP

    The dreams of restoring regular order were grand, but in the words of George Washington University's Sarah Binder, "It's kind of hard to get back to a Senate where the Senate works in that type of a fluid, collegial place. Because that's just not the world — partisan or ideological — that we live in."

  • Exercise Bands

    House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi starts a news conference by donning dark glasses, a teasingly sympathetic gesture to Reid. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

    toggle caption
    J. Scott Applewhite/AP

    House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi starts a news conference by donning dark glasses, a teasingly sympathetic gesture to Reid.

    J. Scott Applewhite/AP

    Resistance bands won't be overtaking P90X as the congressional exercise of choice, after one broke and seriously injured Sen. Harry Reid.

  • Bob Menendez

    Sen. Bob Menendez on Capitol Hill Tuesday. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

    toggle caption
    Andrew Harnik/AP

    Sen. Bob Menendez on Capitol Hill Tuesday.

    Andrew Harnik/AP

    He's technically still in, but Menendez is out as ranking member of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee after he was indicted on federal corruption charges. A majority of New Jersey voters say he should resign, but he is professing his innocence and vowing to fight.

  • Reconciliation, Broader Sense

    House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio kisses Rep. Nancy Pelosi during the opening session of the 114th Congress. Pablo Martinez Monsivais /AP hide caption

    toggle caption
    Pablo Martinez Monsivais /AP

    House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio kisses Rep. Nancy Pelosi during the opening session of the 114th Congress.

    Pablo Martinez Monsivais /AP

    Can't we all just get along? In the first 100 days, the Senate has seen the lowest level of Democratic cosponsorship in 20 years, a New York Times review found. Bill cosponsorship in the House has also dropped compared with previous years.

Have something to add to the list? Tweet @nprpolitics.