How Much Is Donald Trump Worth? We Still Don't Know : It's All Politics The GOP presidential candidate's 92-page financial disclosure still doesn't answer the most burning question — exactly how much is the boisterous billionaire businessman worth?
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How Much Is Donald Trump Worth? We Still Don't Know

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks at his South Carolina campaign kickoff rally in Bluffton, S.C. Stephen B. Morton/AP hide caption

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Stephen B. Morton/AP

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks at his South Carolina campaign kickoff rally in Bluffton, S.C.

Stephen B. Morton/AP

Donald Trump's massive 92-page financial disclosure released Wednesday still didn't answer the most burning question — exactly how much is the boisterous billionaire businessman worth?

The GOP presidential candidate boasted last month he's worth $10 billion, though before he has said it was about $9 billion and Forbes magazine has pegged his net worth at $4 billion.

But the disclosure, required by law for all federal candidates, is simply supposed to prevent conflicts of interests and doesn't nail down every dollar a candidate has, putting candidates into broad categories instead.

Trump checked the highest there is — "more than $50 million" — 21 times, for his seven golf courses, more than 500 businesses and other real estate holdings.

The disclosures do show a vast map of Trump's ownings, ranging from hotels to resorts to restaurants to clothing and even mattresses. In addition, Trump has as much as $227 million in investments, mostly in large, U.S-based companies.

Many of those same business partners, like Macy's and Serta mattresses, terminated their relationship with Trump after he made disparaging comments about Mexican immigrants in his presidential announcement speech.

His Miss Universe and Miss USA pageants, which were dropped by NBC after his comments, paid him $3.4 million in the past 18 months. And his reality TV show on NBC — which he no longer hosts — paid him just $14,000. He received a pension of $110,000 from the Screen Actors Guild.

Some other more quirky income, as pointed out by ABC News, includes $280,000 from his "Trump Ice" brand of bottled water, $589,000 from the Trump Carousel in New York City's Central Park and $1.75 million in speaking fees from just seven speeches.