Latin America Latin America

Latin America

María Guadalupe González, seen here winning the Women's 20 km race at the IAAF World Race Walking Team Championships last May, has been banned from the sport for four years. Yifan Ding/Getty Images for IAAF hide caption

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Yifan Ding/Getty Images for IAAF

Opposition leader Juan Guaidó (left) stands with first vice president Edgar Zambrano before a session of the National Assembly in Caracas in January. Zambrano was arrested Wednesday night. Federico Parra/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Federico Parra/AFP/Getty Images

A worker dumps a bucket of tomatoes into a trailer at DiMare Farms in Florida City, Fla., in 2013. The Trump administration is preparing to level a new tariff on fresh tomatoes imported from Mexico in response to complaints from Florida growers. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Food Fight: Trump Administration Levels Tariffs On Mexican Tomatoes

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Carnival's Fathom cruise line ship Adonia arrives from Miami in Havana on May 2, 2016. Two years later, two U.S. citizens have filed suits against Carnival Corp. for using docks they say the Cuban authorities seized from their families Ramon Espinosa/AP hide caption

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Ramon Espinosa/AP

Suits Filed Against Carnival Cruises, Cuban Firms Over Seized Property In Cuba

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U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, pictured in March, said he plans to tell his Russian counterpart, Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov, that Moscow must stop meddling in the Venezuelan crisis. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

An anti-government protester walks near a bus that was set on fire by other protesters during clashes between rebel and loyalist soldiers in Caracas, Venezuela, on Tuesday. Fernando Llano/AP hide caption

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Fernando Llano/AP

An anti-government protester calls for help as she and another woman help a fellow demonstrator who has been overcome by tear gas during clashes with security forces, in Caracas, Venezuela, on Wednesday. Fernando Llano/AP hide caption

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Fernando Llano/AP

Pro-Maduro Court Orders Arrest Of Prominent Opposition Leader Leopoldo López

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Gusmary Añez sits in a tent with two of her children. She and her husband, along with their four children, had been sleeping outdoors in Maicao, a Colombian town near the Venezuelan border. Now they live in one of 60 tents at the camp that house more than 300 Venezuelans. John Otis for NPR hide caption

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John Otis for NPR

Venezuelans Find Temporary Lifeline At Colombia's First Border Tent Camp

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Venezuelan opposition leader and self-proclaimed acting president Juan Guaido stands under the national flag during a gathering with supporters after members of the Bolivarian National Guard joined his campaign to oust President Nicolas Maduro, in Caracas on April 30. Federico Parra/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Federico Parra/AFP/Getty Images

José Alberto "Chepe" Idiáquez, a Catholic priest and rector at a private Jesuit university in Nicaragua, has become an outspoken critic of Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega. Carlos Herrera hide caption

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Carlos Herrera

'Pray For Me': Nicaraguan Priest Threatened With Death Reaches Out To Niece In U.S.

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The American Museum of Natural History in New York said Monday it is not the "optimal location" for a gala honoring the president of Brazil. Christina Horsten/picture alliance via Getty Image hide caption

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Christina Horsten/picture alliance via Getty Image

An acrylic piece created by a group of teens featuring the Quetzal, the national bird of Guatemala. Courtesy of Frontera Studio hide caption

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Courtesy of Frontera Studio

Opinion: A Showcase Of 'Uncaged Art' By Children Once Detained

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Ariel Ramos, 50, is tearing out coca leaves to be processed into coca paste, a substance that can be smoked or used for making cocaine powder. "I don't need to move to sell coca paste, the buyers come to me. It is easier than planting anything else." Fabiola Ferrero hide caption

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Fabiola Ferrero

Ana Garcia (left) and her daughter Genesis Amaya of Valley Stream, N.Y., were reunited through the Central American Minors program in 2016 before President Trump terminated the program. Claudia Torrens/AP hide caption

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Claudia Torrens/AP

Things in Venezuela are so bad that patients who are hospitalized must bring not only their own food but also medical supplies like syringes and scalpels as well as their own soap and water, a new report says. Barcroft Media/Getty Images hide caption

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Barcroft Media/Getty Images

Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin gives two thumbs up for U.S. Treasurer Jovita Carranza in 2018. On Thursday, President Trump announced that he will nominate Carranza to lead the Small Business Administration. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Caminantes walk back toward Venezuela on the road between Bogotá and Socorro, Colombia. Thousands cross the border each day. Many head back to their home country after failing to find work or shelter. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

Chronicles Of A Venezuelan Exodus: More Families Flee The Crisis On Foot Every Day

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