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Latin America

A person buys soda at a convenience store in San Luis Potosi, Mexico, on April 13. The country has high levels of obesity and medical conditions that health authorities warn are related to a diet high in soda and processed foods. Mauricio Palos/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Mauricio Palos/Bloomberg via Getty Images

'We Had To Take Action': States In Mexico Move To Ban Junk Food Sales To Minors

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Mauricio Claver-Carone, nominated to head the Inter-American Development Bank, speaks with Ricardo Ospina of Caracol TV at the 2019 Concordia Americas Summit in Bogotá, Colombia. Gabriel Aponte/Getty Images for Concordia Summit hide caption

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Gabriel Aponte/Getty Images for Concordia Summit

Contraband fuel sits on the side of a road in Puerto Santander, Colombia, on May 31, 2019. The Venezuelan government's lack of cash to import gasoline combined with U.S. sanctions targeting the oil sector have led to chronic fuel shortages in Venezuela. That has upended a long-running, lucrative contraband gas trade. Ivan Valencia/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Ivan Valencia/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Venezuela's Fuel Shortage Upends Longtime Colombian Border Gas Smuggling Trade

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Demonstrators in front of the prosecutor's office in Lima, Peru, protest gender violence and femicide on June 20. Carlos Garcia Granthon/Fotoholica Press/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Carlos Garcia Granthon/Fotoholica Press/LightRocket via Getty Images

A relative prays at the Mártires 19 de Julio Cemetery on the outskirts of Lima, Peru, on Aug. 20. Peru has one of the world's highest per capita coronavirus-related death tolls, according to Johns Hopkins University. Raul Sifuentes/Getty Images hide caption

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Raul Sifuentes/Getty Images

Peru Locked Down Early. Now It Battles One Of The Worst Coronavirus Outbreaks

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Flaviane da Conceição, 40, a self-employed house cleaner, poses for a photo at her home in the Cidade de Deus favela on July 29 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. A single mother of three, she applied for government emergency aid at the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic and it helps her support her family. Bruna Prado/Getty Images hide caption

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Bruna Prado/Getty Images

People wait for a flu vaccine in May in Manaus, Brazil. The flu season had a surprisingly low count of influenza cases in the Southern Hemisphere, and researchers are trying to figure out the role coronavirus precautions might have played. Andre Coelho/Getty Images hide caption

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Andre Coelho/Getty Images

At least 13 people died trying to escape from a nightclub in Lima when police arrived to shut down a large party on Saturday night. Luka Gonzales/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Luka Gonzales/AFP via Getty Images

Tropical Storm Laura could become a hurricane early next week — around the same time another storm develops into a hurricane in the Gulf of Mexico. The system is forecast to bring rain and flooding to Caribbean islands on its way to the U.S. mainland. National Weather Service hide caption

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National Weather Service

Honduran migrants, Ricardo Sr., (left), his son Ricardo Jr., 13, and his cousin Jorge, 16, walk near their home in Texas. When the two teenage boys crossed the border illegally into Texas last month, they turned themselves in to the Border Patrol. They were later escorted to a hotel by armed men in civilian clothes. Scott Dalton for NPR hide caption

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Scott Dalton for NPR

Shadow Immigration System: Migrant Children Detained In Hotels By Private Contractors

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Former Salvadoran official Inocente Orlando Montano attends a trial in Madrid on June 8 for his alleged role in the killing of five Spanish priests in El Salvador in 1989. Kiko Huesca/EFE via AP hide caption

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Kiko Huesca/EFE via AP

Artists Shawana Brooks and her husband Roosevelt Watson III started the 6 Ft. Away Gallery in their yard in Jacksonville, Florida. They created it as a way to showcase Roosevelt's art at a time when galleries were closed due to the pandemic. Marc Mangra hide caption

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Marc Mangra

Demonstrators block roads to protest the postponement of presidential elections in El Alto, Bolivia. Gaston Brito/Getty Images hide caption

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Gaston Brito/Getty Images

'We Can't Stand It Anymore': Bolivian Protesters Demand Quick Elections

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Top to bottom: must-watch TV shows that people are binge-watching around the world: The Bad Kids in China, Pasión de Gavilanes in Colombia, and Tehran in Israel. Youtube/ Screenshots by NPR hide caption

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Youtube/ Screenshots by NPR

Former Colombian President (2002-2010) and Sen. Álvaro Uribe goes to a hearing before the Supreme Court of Justice in a case over witness tampering in Bogotá, Colombia, on Oct. 8, 2019. The Supreme Court has now ordered Uribe be put under house arrest. Raul Arboleda/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Raul Arboleda/AFP via Getty Images

Colombia's Ex-President Uribe Is Put Under House Arrest, Catches Coronavirus

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Stimulus checks are prepared on May 8, 2008, in Philadelphia. In 2020, stimulus checks again went to many Americans, this time during the pandemic's economic fallout. Some of that money went to thousands of foreign workers not eligible to receive the funds. Jeff Fusco/Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff Fusco/Getty Images

Foreign Workers Living Overseas Mistakenly Received $1,200 U.S. Stimulus Checks

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People wait to buy products with U.S. dollars at a supermarket in Havana on July 20. Cuba has eliminated a tax on dollars and opened "dollar stores" in an attempt to boost the economy. Adalberto Roque/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Adalberto Roque/AFP via Getty Images

Pandemic May Be The Push To Open Cuba's State-Controlled Economy

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Relatives of those who have died from COVID-19 visit graves in the special area of the Municipal Pantheon of Valle de Chalco, Mexico. The coronavirus has taken a heavy toll on the country, especially its poorest citizens. Alfredo Estrella/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Alfredo Estrella/AFP via Getty Images

'If Coronavirus Doesn't Kill Me, Hunger Will': Mexico's Poor Bear Brunt Of Pandemic

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