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Latin America

Karen Paz hugs her daughter, Liliana Saray, 9. They are from San Pedro Sula, Honduras. "I feel free; I feel different," Paz said. "I don't have someone who imposes his views and his ways on me. I am not scared someone will come and attack me, like I used to be." Federica Valabrega hide caption

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Federica Valabrega

Honduran migrants wait in line to cross over the border checkpoint into Guatemala in Agua Caliente, Honduras. A new caravan of at least several hundred Hondurans has set off toward the United States on foot or in vehicles. Some have already crossed into Guatemala. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Motorists wait in line for hours to buy gasoline at a Pemex service station in Guadalajara, Mexico, on Sunday. The Mexican president temporarily closed some of the state oil company's pipelines, in a bid to wipe out rampant fuel theft. Ulises Ruiz/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ulises Ruiz/AFP/Getty Images

When the Gran Splendid Theater in Buenos Aires was converted into a branch of the Ateneo bookstore, the stage became a cafe. It was just named "the world's most beautiful bookstore" by National Geographic. Ronaldo Schemidt/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ronaldo Schemidt/AFP/Getty Images

Inside 'The World's Most Beautiful Bookstore' In Argentina

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Maria Rivas and her 15-year-old daughter, Emily, embrace after their StoryCorps interview last month. Mia Warren/StoryCorps hide caption

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Mia Warren/StoryCorps

A Mom And Her Teenage Daughter Brace For A Future Apart

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Relatives and friends of Eduardo Felipe Santos Victor, a teenager who was shot dead in Morro da Providencia, a low-income favela community, mourn during his funeral in Rio de Janeiro, on Sept. 30, 2015. Silvia Izquierdo/AP hide caption

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Silvia Izquierdo/AP

Venezuela's President Nicolas Maduro takes the oath of office in Caracas, Venezuela, on Thursday. Maduro starts his second term amid international denunciation of his victory and a devastating economic crisis. Ariana Cubillos/AP hide caption

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Ariana Cubillos/AP

People walk in front of Venezuela's Supreme Court of Justice, in Caracas. Venezuelan Justice Christian Zerpa left the country for the U.S., denouncing the re-election of President Nicolás Maduro. Marco Bello/Reuters hide caption

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Marco Bello/Reuters

Alejandro Aparicio Santiago appears in a photograph issued by the Oaxaca state government. The newly elected mayor of the town of Tlaxiaco was killed within hours of taking office. Facebook.com/AlejandroAparicioMorena hide caption

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Facebook.com/AlejandroAparicioMorena

Migrants run as tear gas is thrown by U.S. Customs and Border Protection agents to the Mexican side of the border fence after they climbed the fence to get to San Diego from Tijuana, Mexico. Daniel Ochoa de Olza/AP hide caption

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Daniel Ochoa de Olza/AP

U.S. Agents Fire Tear Gas At Migrants Trying To Cross Mexico Border

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Brazil's President Jair Bolsonaro and his wife Michelle Bolsonaro head to the National Congress for his swearing-in ceremony, in Brasilia on Jan. 1. Carl De Souza/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Carl De Souza/AFP/Getty Images

On New Year's Day, Jair Bolsonaro will be sworn in as president of Brazil. He's an admirer of Donald Trump, and his rise to power has created — and reflected — deep divisions among Brazilians. Buda Mendes/Getty Images hide caption

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Buda Mendes/Getty Images

Jair Bolsonaro, A Polarizing Figure, Prepares To Become Brazil's President

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