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Latin America

Former Colombian President (2002-2010) and Sen. Álvaro Uribe goes to a hearing before the Supreme Court of Justice in a case over witness tampering in Bogotá, Colombia, on Oct. 8, 2019. The Supreme Court has now ordered Uribe be put under house arrest. Raul Arboleda/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Raul Arboleda/AFP via Getty Images

Colombia's Ex-President Uribe Is Put Under House Arrest, Catches Coronavirus

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Stimulus checks are prepared on May 8, 2008, in Philadelphia. In 2020, stimulus checks again went to many Americans, this time during the pandemic's economic fallout. Some of that money went to thousands of foreign workers not eligible to receive the funds. Jeff Fusco/Getty Images hide caption

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Foreign Workers Living Overseas Mistakenly Received $1,200 U.S. Stimulus Checks

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People wait to buy products with U.S. dollars at a supermarket in Havana on July 20. Cuba has eliminated a tax on dollars and opened "dollar stores" in an attempt to boost the economy. Adalberto Roque/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Pandemic May Be The Push To Open Cuba's State-Controlled Economy

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Relatives of those who have died from COVID-19 visit graves in the special area of the Municipal Pantheon of Valle de Chalco, Mexico. The coronavirus has taken a heavy toll on the country, especially its poorest citizens. Alfredo Estrella/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Alfredo Estrella/AFP via Getty Images

'If Coronavirus Doesn't Kill Me, Hunger Will': Mexico's Poor Bear Brunt Of Pandemic

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Michelle Bolsonaro tested positive on Thursday — days after her husband, Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro, said he had recovered from the disease. The pair are seen here at an event on Wednesday. Alan Santos/Planalto Palace photograph hide caption

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Alan Santos/Planalto Palace photograph

President of Venezuela Nicolás Maduro speaks at Miraflores government palace on March 12, in Caracas, Venezuela. Despite international pressure and attempts to remove him, the leader has clung to power. Carolina Cabral/Getty Images hide caption

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Venezuela's Maduro Holds Firmly To Power — And Squeezes The Opposition

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Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro takes a ride on a motorcycle Saturday in Brasilia after he announced he tested negative for the coronavirus. He had tested positive earlier this month. Sergio Lima/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Sergio Lima/AFP via Getty Images

The Santiago Bahá'í Temple, designed by Hariri and his team. doublespace photography/TED hide caption

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doublespace photography/TED

Siamak Hariri: How Do You Create A Sacred Space?

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Police officers guard a crime scene following an assassination attempt on Mexico City's chief of police Omar García Harfuch, in Mexico City last month. Luis Cortes/Reuters hide caption

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Luis Cortes/Reuters

As Mexico's Dominant Cartel Gains Power, The President Vows 'Hugs, Not Bullets'

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Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro waves to supporters from the Alvorada Palace in Brasilia on Monday, the same day that two more of his Cabinet ministers were diagnosed with COVID-19. Evaristo Sa/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Evaristo Sa/AFP via Getty Images

Police stand guard during a government order for residents to stay home, to help contain the spread of the new coronavirus, as a resident walks to a food store in Soacha on the outskirts of Bogotá, Colombia, on March 25. Fernando Vergara/AP hide caption

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Fernando Vergara/AP

Colombia Sees Bouts Of Looting As Coronavirus Fallout Puts People Out Of Work

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Left: Tech entrepreneur Ruchit Garg is helping farmers connect to customers in India. Center: A mariachi band brings music and joy to the streets of Colombia during lockdown. Right: Designer Rhea Shah created an affordable cardboard bed for health facilities in India. Rohit Garg; Jorge Calle; Pritesh Prajapati hide caption

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Rohit Garg; Jorge Calle; Pritesh Prajapati

Bolivian President Jeanine Áñez is pictured before donating blood at the presidential palace in La Paz last month amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Aizar Raldes/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Aizar Raldes/AFP via Getty Images

Gurmeet Singh holds a photo of his granddaughter, Gurupreet Kaur, who died of heatstroke in Arizona in June 2019. The 6-year-old and her mother had just crossed into the U.S. from Mexico. Lauren Frayer/NPR hide caption

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The Long, Perilous Route Thousands Of Indians Have Risked For A Shot At Life In U.S.

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A women's movement activist holds a sign that reads in Portuguese "Genocide 60 thousand deaths, Bolsonaro out" during a protest against the government's handling of the pandemic earlier this month. Eraldo Peres/AP hide caption

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Eraldo Peres/AP

Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro has repeatedly doubted the severity of the virus since it first found a foothold in Brazil, reportedly in late February. Andressa Anholete/Getty Images hide caption

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Andressa Anholete/Getty Images

Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador, seen here last month in Mexico City, will visit President Trump at the White House this week. Hector Vivas/Getty Images hide caption

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Hector Vivas/Getty Images

Mexico's President Weathers A Torrent Of Criticism Over Meeting With Trump

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A nurse protests Chile's handling of the coronavirus pandemic. The country now has the highest per capita infection rate of any major country — 13,000 cases for every 1 million people. Marcelo Hernandez/Getty Images hide caption

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Marcelo Hernandez/Getty Images

How Chile Ended Up With One Of The Highest COVID-19 Rates

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(L to R): Sen. Heherson Alvarez, an environmental lawmaker from the Philippines; Durdana Rizvi, a doctor from Pakistan; Colombian actor Antonio Bolívar; 'Nanī' Nabi, a grandmother from Kashmir; Rocio Choque, a soup kitchen volunteer from Argentina. Eduardo Munoz/Reuters; Andaleeb Rizvi; Lucas Jackson/Reuters; Javaid Iqbal; Anita Pouchard Serra for NPR hide caption

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Eduardo Munoz/Reuters; Andaleeb Rizvi; Lucas Jackson/Reuters; Javaid Iqbal; Anita Pouchard Serra for NPR