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Latin America

An acrylic piece created by a group of teens featuring the Quetzal, the national bird of Guatemala. Courtesy of Frontera Studio hide caption

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Courtesy of Frontera Studio

Opinion: A Showcase Of 'Uncaged Art' By Children Once Detained

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Ariel Ramos, 50, is tearing out coca leaves to be processed into coca paste, a substance that can be smoked or used for making cocaine powder. "I don't need to move to sell coca paste, the buyers come to me. It is easier than planting anything else." Fabiola Ferrero hide caption

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Fabiola Ferrero

Ana Garcia (left) and her daughter Genesis Amaya of Valley Stream, N.Y., were reunited through the Central American Minors program in 2016 before President Trump terminated the program. Claudia Torrens/AP hide caption

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Claudia Torrens/AP

Things in Venezuela are so bad that patients who are hospitalized must bring not only their own food but also medical supplies like syringes and scalpels as well as their own soap and water, a new report says. Barcroft Media/Getty Images hide caption

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Barcroft Media/Getty Images

Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin gives two thumbs up for U.S. Treasurer Jovita Carranza in 2018. On Thursday, President Trump announced that he will nominate Carranza to lead the Small Business Administration. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Caminantes walk back toward Venezuela on the road between Bogotá and Socorro, Colombia. Thousands cross the border each day. Many head back to their home country after failing to find work or shelter. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

Chronicles Of A Venezuelan Exodus: More Families Flee The Crisis On Foot Every Day

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Venezuela's power grid crashed on March 7, 2019, throwing almost all of the oil-rich nation's 30 million residents into chaos for nearly a week. Ariana Cubillos/AP hide caption

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Ariana Cubillos/AP

'New York Times' Journalist Describes An 'Almost Unimaginable' Crisis In Venezuela

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President Trump says he will close the United States' Southern border, or large sections of it, next week if Mexico does not immediately stop illegal immigration. Here Trump speaks to reporters during a visit to Lake Okeechobee and Herbert Hoover Dike at Canal Point, Fla., on Friday. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

A worker at VKE Cargo in Miami prepares a pallet containing cargo to be shipped to Venezuela. Fewer shipping companies are willing and able to ship to Venezuela. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Greg Allen/NPR

A Shortage Of Shippers For Badly Needed Supplies Of Food And Medicine To Venezuela

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Trucks wait to enter the United States at the border crossing in Tijuana, Mexico, in 2017. More than $1.6 billion in goods flow across the border each day. Jorge Duenes/Reuters hide caption

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Jorge Duenes/Reuters

How Closing The Border Would Affect U.S. Economy, From Avocados To Autos

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A woman holds a placard reading "We Want Water and Electricity" as she shouts slogans during a protest in Caracas, Venezuela, about a lack of water and electric service during a new power outage in the country on Sunday. President Nicolás Maduro announced a 30-day electricity rationing plan to help as the government works to restore service. Federico Parra/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Federico Parra/AFP/Getty Images

Young men carry luggage from Venezuela into Colombia under the Simón Bolívar International Bridge. Tensions are rising in this border area, where many Venezuelans are seeking refuge and are anxious for change back home. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

'Time To Act': Venezuelans Who Fled To Colombia Are Eager To Oust Maduro

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The sea squirt Ascidia sydneiensis, a tubelike animal that squirts water out of its body when alarmed, is one of 48 additional nonnative marine species in the Galapagos Islands documented in a newly published study. Previously, researchers knew of only five. Courtesy of Jim Carlton hide caption

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Courtesy of Jim Carlton

Dozens Of Nonnative Marine Species Have Invaded The Galapagos Islands

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Former Brazilian President Michel Temer, pictured in 2018, was arrested Thursday on corruption charges. He faced similar charges of bribery in 2017, during his brief stint in office. The 78-year-old denies any wrongdoing. Amilcar Orfali/Getty Images hide caption

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Amilcar Orfali/Getty Images

Colombian police escort a Venezuelan soldier into Cúcuta, Colombia. The soldier surrendered at a bridge crossing the Venezuela-Colombia border, where people tried to carry humanitarian aid into Venezuela on Feb. 23. Fernando Vergara/AP hide caption

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Fernando Vergara/AP

1,000 Venezuelan Armed Forces Have Fled Across Border, Says Colombian Government

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Nicaragua's Apostolic Nuncio Waldemar Sommertag speaks next to the OAS special envoy Luis Ángel Rosadilla during a news conference in Managua on Wednesday. They said the government had agreed to release detainees within 90 days. Maynor Valenzuela/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Maynor Valenzuela/AFP/Getty Images

A damaged door frame is seen at the home of Roberto Marrero in Caracas on Thursday. Opposition leader Juan Guaidó says his chief of staff was detained by Venezuelan intelligence agents. Ivan Alvarado/Reuters hide caption

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Ivan Alvarado/Reuters

Eloisa Tamez of El Calaboz, Texas, walks along the border wall in her backyard. She took the government to court over surveying her land and over the compensation she received for the land needed for border wall construction. Reynaldo Leanos Jr./Texas Public Radio hide caption

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Reynaldo Leanos Jr./Texas Public Radio

Rio Grande Valley Landowners Plan To Fight Border Wall Expansion

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