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Latin America

A man waves campaign flags in favor of a new constitution ahead of a referendum on the matter in Santiago, Chile, on Aug. 26. In a referendum on Sunday, Chileans will vote whether to scrap the constitution from the dictatorship of Gen. Augusto Pinochet. Esteban Felix/AP hide caption

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Esteban Felix/AP

Bolivian presidential candidate Luis Arce (center) and running mate David Choquehuanca (second right) celebrate during a news conference Monday in La Paz, Bolivia. Juan Karita/AP hide caption

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Juan Karita/AP

Then-Mexican Defense Secretary Gen. Salvador Cienfuegos (right) with then-U.S. Defense Secretary Jim Mattis at the Pentagon in 2017. Cienfuegos was arrested Thursday at Los Angeles International Airport. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

U.S. Arrests Mexico's Ex-Defense Chief, Accused Of Helping Drug Cartel

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Dina el-Harazy and Adham Bagory were married in a private garden in Cairo, Egypt. Angel Miles teaches 5th graders for a D.C. public school. She worries about her students and herself during the pandemic. Figure skater Gian-Quen Isaacs practices at a rink in Cape Town, South Africa. The 15-year-old skater is holding fast to her Olympic dreams. Sima Diab, Dee Dwyer and Samatha Reinders for NPR hide caption

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Sima Diab, Dee Dwyer and Samatha Reinders for NPR

The statue of Sebastián de Belalcázar, a 16th century Spanish conquistador, lies on the ground after it was pulled down by Indigenous people in Popayán, Colombia, earlier this year. Julian Moreno/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Julian Moreno/AFP via Getty Images

U.S. Statue Removals Inspire Indigenous People In Latin America To Topple Monuments

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(Left) During the coronavirus pandemic, cleaning has become more intense and important. Gloves used for cleaning photographer Celeste Alonso's house in Buenos Aires, Argentina. (Right) Plants on Alonso's balcony. Celeste Alonso hide caption

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Celeste Alonso

A person buys soda at a convenience store in San Luis Potosi, Mexico, on April 13. The country has high levels of obesity and medical conditions that health authorities warn are related to a diet high in soda and processed foods. Mauricio Palos/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Mauricio Palos/Bloomberg via Getty Images

'We Had To Take Action': States In Mexico Move To Ban Junk Food Sales To Minors

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Mauricio Claver-Carone, nominated to head the Inter-American Development Bank, speaks with Ricardo Ospina of Caracol TV at the 2019 Concordia Americas Summit in Bogotá, Colombia. Gabriel Aponte/Getty Images for Concordia Summit hide caption

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Gabriel Aponte/Getty Images for Concordia Summit

Contraband fuel sits on the side of a road in Puerto Santander, Colombia, on May 31, 2019. The Venezuelan government's lack of cash to import gasoline combined with U.S. sanctions targeting the oil sector have led to chronic fuel shortages in Venezuela. That has upended a long-running, lucrative contraband gas trade. Ivan Valencia/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Ivan Valencia/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Venezuela's Fuel Shortage Upends Longtime Colombian Border Gas Smuggling Trade

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Demonstrators in front of the prosecutor's office in Lima, Peru, protest gender violence and femicide on June 20. Carlos Garcia Granthon/Fotoholica Press/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Carlos Garcia Granthon/Fotoholica Press/LightRocket via Getty Images

A relative prays at the Mártires 19 de Julio Cemetery on the outskirts of Lima, Peru, on Aug. 20. Peru has one of the world's highest per capita coronavirus-related death tolls, according to Johns Hopkins University. Raul Sifuentes/Getty Images hide caption

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Raul Sifuentes/Getty Images

Peru Locked Down Early. Now It Battles One Of The Worst Coronavirus Outbreaks

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Flaviane da Conceição, 40, a self-employed house cleaner, poses for a photo at her home in the Cidade de Deus favela on July 29 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. A single mother of three, she applied for government emergency aid at the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic and it helps her support her family. Bruna Prado/Getty Images hide caption

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Bruna Prado/Getty Images

People wait for a flu vaccine in May in Manaus, Brazil. The flu season had a surprisingly low count of influenza cases in the Southern Hemisphere, and researchers are trying to figure out the role coronavirus precautions might have played. Andre Coelho/Getty Images hide caption

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Andre Coelho/Getty Images

At least 13 people died trying to escape from a nightclub in Lima when police arrived to shut down a large party on Saturday night. Luka Gonzales/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Luka Gonzales/AFP via Getty Images

Tropical Storm Laura could become a hurricane early next week — around the same time another storm develops into a hurricane in the Gulf of Mexico. The system is forecast to bring rain and flooding to Caribbean islands on its way to the U.S. mainland. National Weather Service hide caption

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National Weather Service

Honduran migrants, Ricardo Sr., (left), his son Ricardo Jr., 13, and his cousin Jorge, 16, walk near their home in Texas. When the two teenage boys crossed the border illegally into Texas last month, they turned themselves in to the Border Patrol. They were later escorted to a hotel by armed men in civilian clothes. Scott Dalton for NPR hide caption

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Scott Dalton for NPR

Shadow Immigration System: Migrant Children Detained In Hotels By Private Contractors

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