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Latin America

Second Rebel Group Is Ready To Talk Peace With Colombia's Government

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A pregnant woman gets an ultrasound to monitor for the birth defect microcephaly, in Guatemala City last month. Johan Ordonez/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Johan Ordonez/AFP/Getty Images

Pregnant Women May Be Able To Get Answers About Zika Earlier

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Why Tijuana's 'Tunnel People' Take The Risk

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The headquarters of the Bank of Venezuela (from left) and buildings housing the National Assembly and various government ministries stand in darkness in Caracas on March 22. Venezuela shut down for a week to conserve electricity amid a deepening power crisis. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg via Getty Images

In Venezuela, An Electricity Crisis Adds To Country's Woes

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United States players celebrate a goal against Guatemala during the second half of a World Cup qualifying soccer match Tuesday in Columbus, Ohio. The United States beat Guatemala 4-0. Jay LaPrete/AP hide caption

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Jay LaPrete/AP

A woman places flowers on a coffin during a protest against violence in Rio de Janeiro last October. Brazil's violence is at an all-time high, with nearly 60,000 murders a year. Silvia Izquierdo/AP hide caption

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Silvia Izquierdo/AP

Brazil Has Nearly 60,000 Murders, And It May Relax Gun Laws

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The Rolling Stones To Play First Concert In Havana

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Soccer Wins Over New Generation Of Fans In Cuba

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There are about 1,000 genetically engineered mosquitoes in each pot. Guilherme Trivellato of the biotech company Oxitec prepares to release them in Piracicaba, Brazil, in the hope of reducing the spread of Zika and other viruses. Catherine Osborn/for NPR hide caption

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Catherine Osborn/for NPR

How Could Releasing More Mosquitoes Help Fight Zika?

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Scientists Reveal New Evidence Of Possible Zika Spread Beyond South America

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