Latin America Latin America

Latin America

Brazil's President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva (right) with Workers' Party presidential candidate Dilma Rousseff during a campaign rally in Campinas, Brazil, on Sept. 18. The presidential election is Sunday. Andre Penner/AP hide caption

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Andre Penner/AP

In Brazil, Lula Stumps For His Hand-Picked Successor

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Laborers for Brazilian construction company Odebrecht work on a construction site in Luanda, Angola, in January 2010. Odebrecht is among the major Brazilian companies that are expanding the South American country's economic influence around the world. Issouf Sanogo/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Issouf Sanogo/AFP/Getty Images

Burgeoning Brazil Seeks Profits Beyond Its Borders

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Faux World Cup Draws Attention To Homelessness

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Mexican Landslide Less Deadly Than Feared

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Rescuers Rush To Aid Landslide Victims In Mexico

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Two women stand in front of graffiti that says "Your vote is secret" in Caracas, Venezuela, on Thursday. Sunday's parliamentary elections will likely reduce President Hugo Chavez's sway on the National Assembly by giving the opposition its first voice there since it boycotted the last vote in 2005. Juan Barreto/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Juan Barreto/AFP/Getty Images

In this Aug. 7 photo, a Mexican journalist protests the targeting of journalists by drug cartels and others in the country. The unrest has prompted some journalists to seek asylum in the U.S. Marco Ugarte/AP hide caption

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Marco Ugarte/AP

Mexican policemen and soldiers guard the place where the bodies of two alleged kidnappers remain after being killed by an angry mob in Ascencion, Mexico, on Tuesday. Jesus Alcazar/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jesus Alcazar/AFP/Getty Images

Some sights in Port-au-Prince have changed in the eight months that have passed since the earthquake. Billboards advertising mobile phones, home appliances and Delta Air Lines tower over a sprawling tent camp near Haiti’s international airport and stand in stark contrast to the meager lives of the camp’s dispossessed residents. Courtesy of Valentina Pasquali hide caption

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Courtesy of Valentina Pasquali

Amid Slow Recovery, Haiti's Tent Cities Remain

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