Latin America Latin America

Latin America

Paleontologist Kenneth Lacovara speaks at TED in 2016. Bret Hartman/TED hide caption

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Bret Hartman/TED

What's The Anthropocene?

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Colombians To Vote Sunday On Peace Agreement With Rebels

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Lucas Siqueira identified himself as mixed race on his application for a job at Brazil's Ministry of Foreign Affairs. The government decided he wasn't, and his case is still on hold. As part of the affirmative action program in Brazil, state governments have now set up boards to racially classify job applicants. Courtesy of Lucas Siqueira hide caption

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Courtesy of Lucas Siqueira

For Affirmative Action, Brazil Sets Up Controversial Boards To Determine Race

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A private entrepreneur who sells house and kitchen supplies waits for customers in May at his home in Havana. Austerity measures in Cuba and a drop in subsidized fuel from Venezuela are hampering the economy. Desmond Boylan/AP hide caption

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Desmond Boylan/AP

Austerity Measures In Cuba Spark Fears Of A Return To Dark Economic Times

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Postal Worker Faces Unusual Challenges Working In Rio's Favelas

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Colombians in the capital, Bogota, hold up the letters for "peace" in Spanish in September. That agreement between the Colombian government and FARC rebels was rejected by voters in an October referendum. An amended agreement was signed Thursday and is expected to be approved. If implemented, it would end 60 years of nonstop conflict in Latin America. Jennifer Alarcon/AP hide caption

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Jennifer Alarcon/AP

Colombia, Rebels Sign Treaty To End Latin America's Oldest Guerrilla War

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U.S. envoy Bernard Aronson speaks at the State Department in Washingon on Feb. 20, 2015. Secretary of State John Kerry said Aronson announced that Aronson would be the special envoy to Colombia, where he helped negotiate an end to that country's 52-year war. BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images

The American Diplomat Who Helped Bring An End To Colombia's War

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Brazilian actor Wagner Moura plays Pablo Escobar in Netflix's Narcos. Executive producer Eric Newman says Escobar was "very likely a sociopath, and certainly a terrorist." Juan Pablo Gutierrez/Netflix hide caption

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Juan Pablo Gutierrez/Netflix

'Narcos' Producer On The Drug War, Colombia And Escobar's Son's Grievances

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Gloria, 13, of Oaxaca, Mexico, holds a duck at home. Sexually abused by her father, she became a mother at the age of 12. Christian Rodrí­guez/Getty Images Instagram Grant Recipient 2016 hide caption

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Christian Rodrí­guez/Getty Images Instagram Grant Recipient 2016

Sebastian Marroquin, son of Colombia's late drug lord Pablo Escobar, spends much of his time barnstorming across Latin America as a motivational speaker, denouncing the illegal drug trade and his father's ultra-violent ways. "I feel I have a moral responsibility to go before society, recognize my father's crimes and to apologize to the victims of these crimes," Marroquín tells NPR. Eduardo Di Baia/AP images hide caption

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Eduardo Di Baia/AP images

Renouncing Pablo Escobar's Sins, His Son Trafficks In Motivational Talks

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