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Latin America

Residents of Barbuda were forced to flee when Hurricane Irma devastated their island on its way through the Caribbean. Here, Jackeline Deazle, whose house lost its roof and windows, is seen at a shelter in the Sir Vivian Richards Stadium last week in North Sound, on Antigua. Jose Jimenez/Getty Images hide caption

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Jose Jimenez/Getty Images

Mexico City Trying To Return To Normal After Earthquake's Destruction

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Quick Building Demolitions Raise Questions In Mexico

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Twins Heloisa (left) and Heloa Barbosa, both born with microcephaly, had a one-year birthday party on April 16 in Areia, Brazil. Their mother says she contracted the Zika virus during pregnancy. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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How Zika Became So Dangerous For Babies

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U.S. Border Patrol Concentrates On Recruiting Younger People

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In Earthquake Aftermath, It's Uncertain When Kids In Mexico Will Return To School

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Relatives of people who are presumed still buried beneath the rubble await news of rescue efforts in Mexico City on Tuesday. Ronaldo Schemidt/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ronaldo Schemidt/AFP/Getty Images

In Puerto Rico, Residents Scramble For Supplies A Week After Hurricane Maria

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A deforested area of the Amazon rainforest in Para state, Brazil, in August. On Monday, the Brazilian government reversed its decision to open the National Reserve of Copper and Associates, which rests across Para and Amapa states. Nacho Doce/Reuters hide caption

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Nacho Doce/Reuters

Violence In Brazil Escalates, Army Is Deployed To Neighborhoods

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Carmen Rivera (at left in the orange dress) sits on a cot at the Cataño shelter. She suffers from severe asthma and knee pain and has had to be rushed by ambulance to the hospital for asthma treatment twice since the hurricane. She says she feels forgotten by authorities. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Greg Allen/NPR

Desperation In Puerto Rican Town Where 60 Percent Are Now Homeless

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Entrepreneurs sort cocoa beans on a tray at Cacao de Origen, a school founded by Maria Di Giacobbe to train Venezuelan women in the making of premium chocolate. Zeina Alvarado (left) later found work in a bean-to-bar production facility in Mexico. Courtesy of Cacao de Origen hide caption

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Courtesy of Cacao de Origen