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Bullhorns are seen during a demonstration in front of the Supreme Court on June 29. The court had a momentous term with cases ranging from President Trump's financial records to immigration and abortion. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

A Powerful Chief And Unexpected Splits: 6 Takeaways From The Supreme Court Term

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A corrections officer stands guard in late June at San Quentin State Prison. More than a third of the inmates and staff at the prison in the San Francisco Bay Area have tested positive for the coronavirus. David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images

The death chamber, equipped for lethal injection, at the U.S. Penitentiary in Terre Haute, Ind., is shown in this April 1995 photo. Federal executions are set to resume on Monday. Chuck Robinson /AP hide caption

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Chuck Robinson /AP

Federal Executions Set To Resume After 17 Years With 3 Deaths Scheduled Soon

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TED

Martha Minow: How Can Restorative Justice Create A More Equitable Legal System?

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Chief Justice John Roberts, here at the State of the Union address in February, has concluded a momentous term with the Supreme Court. Leah Millis/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Leah Millis/Pool/Getty Images

Chief Justice John Roberts Rebuked Trump This Term. What's He Up To?

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The Supreme Court ruled Thursday that about half of the land in Oklahoma is within a Native American reservation as stated in treaties. Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

Los Angeles police say they have arrested five people in connection with the February shooting death of rapper Pop Smoke. The late musician is seen here during Paris Fashion Week's men's fall-winter shows in January. Claudio Lavenia/Getty Images hide caption

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Claudio Lavenia/Getty Images

The president swiftly responded to the Supreme Court rulings on Twitter saying the legal battle, which has not been put to rest, is "not fair to this Presidency or Administration!" J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Supreme Court Says Trump Not 'Immune' From Records Release, But Hedges On House Case

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This combination of photos provided by the Hennepin County Sheriff's Office shows (from left) Derek Chauvin, J. Alexander Kueng, Thomas Lane and Tou Thao, the officers involved in George Floyd's death. AP hide caption

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AP

"People started screaming and shouting for them to let me go," says Vauhxx Booker, who says he was assaulted by a group of white men on July 4. Booker is seen here speaking at a community gathering against racism, where protesters demanded charges in his case. Jeremy Hogan/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Jeremy Hogan/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

'I Didn't Want To Be A Hashtag,' Says Black Man Who Feared Being Lynched In Indiana

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Army Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman arrives on Capitol Hill in October as part of the impeachment inquiry. Controversy has grown over an abnormal stall in Vindman's promotion to the rank of full colonel. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

A statue of John Harvard, namesake of the university, overlooks the campus earlier this year. Harvard University joined the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in suing the federal government over its policies on international students Wednesday. Maddie Meyer/Getty Images hide caption

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Maddie Meyer/Getty Images

Wednesday's decision seems to be an extension of a 2012 ruling in which the Supreme Court unanimously found that a fourth-grade teacher at a Lutheran school who was commissioned as a minister could not sue over her firing. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Justices Rule Teachers At Religious Schools Aren't Protected By Fair Employment Laws

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Chief Justice of the United States John Roberts awaits the arrival of President Trump in the House of Representatives to deliver the State of the Union address in February. Roberts spent one night in the hospital in June after injuring his forehead in a fall. Leah Millis/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Leah Millis/Pool/Getty Images
Therrious Davis for NPR

The U.S. killed Iranian Maj. Gen. Qassem Soleimani in a targeted drone strike in Baghdad. A U.N. investigator says the action violated Iraq's sovereignty. Here, protesters in Tehran, Iran, hold up an image of Soleimani during a demonstration on Jan. 3. Ali Mohammadi/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Ali Mohammadi/Bloomberg via Getty Images

The Supreme Court decides that Electoral College delegates have "no ground for reversing" the statewide popular vote. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Supreme Court Rules State 'Faithless Elector' Laws Constitutional

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The historic Thurgood Marshal U.S. Courthouse building, right, in New York City. A judge is assessing a case there after prosecutors admitted missteps, although they said with no malice intended. Mary Altaffer/AP hide caption

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Mary Altaffer/AP

Chris Mosier, the first known transgender person to qualify for an Olympic trial, joined protesters in Boise, Idaho, to push back against legislation targeting transgender residents. James Dawson/Boise State Public Radio hide caption

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James Dawson/Boise State Public Radio

New Idaho Laws Target Transgender Residents

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