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Migrants and asylum seekers protest outside the United States Consulate against the public health order known as Title 42, in Tijuana, Mexico, on May 19. Guillermo Arias/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Guillermo Arias/AFP via Getty Images

People gather at the scene of a mass shooting at Tops Friendly Market at Jefferson Avenue and Riley Street on Monday, May 16, 2022 in Buffalo, NY. Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Flowers, candles and mementoes are left at a makeshift memorial outside the Tops market on May 18, 2022 in Buffalo, New York. Police say the shooting that killed 10 and wounded three is being investigated as a racially motivated hate crime. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images
Shane Tolentino for NPR

Telehealth abortion demand is soaring. But access may come down to where you live

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Body armor on display at a store in Pennsylvania in 2011. Ryan McFadden/MediaNews Group/Reading Eagle via Getty Images hide caption

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Ryan McFadden/MediaNews Group/Reading Eagle via Getty Images

Delaware State University says it has filed a complaint to the U.S. Department of Justice Wednesday to investigate the women's lacrosse team bus stop and search. Here, the main gate of the Delaware State University campus in Dover in September 2007. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

An industry group representing major tech companies, including Google, Facebook and Twitter, is asking the Supreme Court to stop a Texas social media law from going into effect. DENIS CHARLET/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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DENIS CHARLET/AFP via Getty Images

Oklahoma Gov. Kevin Stitt poses for a photo with the bill he signed, making it a felony to perform an abortion, punishable by up to 10 years in prison, on April 12, 2022, in Oklahoma City, following a bill signing ceremony. Sue Ogrocki/AP hide caption

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Sue Ogrocki/AP

Russian Army Sgt. Vadim Shishimarin, 21, pleaded guilty Wednesday to killing an unarmed Ukrainian man during the first days of Russia's invasion in Ukraine. His case is the first war crimes trial since Russia invaded Ukraine nearly three months ago. Efrem Lukatsky/AP hide caption

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Efrem Lukatsky/AP

Courtroom drama: Ukrainian widow confronts Russian who shot her husband

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Pro-abortion rights demonstrators march in Washington, D.C., on May 14. While most U.S. adults favor some restrictions on abortion, according to our new poll, most also say they do not support overturning Roe v. Wade. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

Poll: Two-thirds say don't overturn Roe; the court leak is firing up Democratic voters

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A depiction of the first ovariotomy, which was performed in 1809. Library of Congress hide caption

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Library of Congress

As police and FBI agents continue their investigation into the shooting at Tops Market in Buffalo, N.Y., last weekend, Congress is considering legislation to address domestic terrorism. Authorities say the attack was believed to be motivated by racial hatred. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Days after Buffalo mass shooting, the House approves a bill to fight domestic terror

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President Biden signed the Safe Sleep for Babies Act of 2021 on Monday, outlawing the manufacture and sale of crib bumpers and certain inclined infant sleepers. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Former Minneapolis police officer Thomas Lane pleaded guilty Wednesday to a state charge of aiding and abetting second-degree manslaughter in the killing of George Floyd. Hennepin County Sheriff's Office via AP hide caption

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Hennepin County Sheriff's Office via AP