Law NPR stories on legal issues, court rulings, Supreme Court hearings, new laws and government investigations. Download the NPR Justice Talking podcast and subscribe to the Legal Affairs RSS feed.

Law

With official charges submitted against three men accused in bombings in Indonesia in 2002 and 2003, the U.S. must arraign the prisoners before a military commission at a U.S. base in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Maren Hennemuth/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Maren Hennemuth/Getty Images

Riley Williams, 22, of Harrisburg, Pa., will have to wear an ankle monitor and can only leave her mother's home for work and some other court-approved reasons, as reported by the Patriot-News. Dauphin County Prison via AP hide caption

toggle caption
Dauphin County Prison via AP

Even before Amazon booted Parler off its Web service, Apple and Google had banned it from their respective app stores. Jaap Arriens/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jaap Arriens/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Judge Refuses To Reinstate Parler After Amazon Shut It Down

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/956486352/959387548" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Larry Rendall Brock Jr., an Air Force veteran, is seen inside the Senate Chamber wearing a military-style helmet and tactical vest during the rioting at the U.S. Capitol. Federal prosecutors have alleged that before the attack, Brock posted on Facebook about an impending "Second Civil War." Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Win McNamee/Getty Images

Nearly 1 In 5 Defendants In Capitol Riot Cases Served In The Military

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/958915267/959336020" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Tenants' rights advocates protesting evictions during the pandemic in Boston this month. They want the Biden administration to not only extend, but also strengthen, an eviction order from the CDC aimed at keeping people in their homes during the outbreak. Michael Dwyer/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Michael Dwyer/AP

Protesters hold signs at a rally about the 2020 census in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in 2019. President-elect Joe Biden has revoked the Trump administration's policy of excluding unauthorized immigrants from population numbers used to reallocate congressional seats and Electoral College votes. Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call via Getty Images

Secretary of Defense nominee Lloyd Austin, a retired Army general, speaks during his conformation hearing before the Senate Armed Services Committee on Capitol Hill, Tuesday. If confirmed, Austin would be the first Black Secretary of Defense. Jim Lo Scalzo/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Jim Lo Scalzo/AP

Alleged members of several different right-wing and extremist groups are facing charges in connection with the Jan. 6 siege at the U.S. Capitol. Roberto Schmidt/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Roberto Schmidt/AFP via Getty Images

Former Florida data scientist Rebekah Jones turned herself in to authorities Sunday night. She accuses the state of retaliating against her for speaking out about its COVID-19 policies and officials' decisions related to the pandemic. Courtesy Rebekah Jones hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy Rebekah Jones

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi's signature is seen on the single article of impeachment against President Trump. The case against the president now moves to the U.S. Senate, which will consider the article after Trump is no longer in office. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Alex Brandon/AP

Can The Senate Try An Ex-President?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/957866252/957982015" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, a Democrat from California, speaks during a news conference at the U.S. Capitol on Friday. Sarah Silbiger/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Sarah Silbiger/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene, R-Ga., yells at journalists after setting off the metal detector outside the doors to the House of Representatives Chamber on Jan. 12. Twitter suspended the newly elected lawmaker's account temporarily on Sunday. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Gab was founded in 2016 as an almost anti-Twitter. The platform embraces far-right and other extremist provocateurs, including Milo Yiannopoulos and Alex Jones, who have been banned from Facebook and Twitter over incendiary posts. Rafael Henrique/SIPA Images/Reuters hide caption

toggle caption
Rafael Henrique/SIPA Images/Reuters

Social Media Site Gab Is Surging, Even As Critics Blame It For Capitol Violence

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/957512634/957779191" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

This 2015 photo provided by Shawn Nolan Chief, Capital Habeas Unit Community Federal Defender Office for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania, shows Dustin Higgs at the Federal Prison in Terre Haute, Ind. Federal Bureau of Prisons/Community Federal Defender Office for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania via AP hide caption

toggle caption
Federal Bureau of Prisons/Community Federal Defender Office for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania via AP