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Houston Police Chief Art Acevedo said criminal charges will be filed "against whoever is appropriate" on his department, following a drug bust that resulted in the deaths of two suspects. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Roger Stone has been ordered to appear in court on Thursday following an Instagram post that criticized the judge in his case. The judge may reconsider her gag order or Stone's bail. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Ginsburg, sketched here with the rest of the Supreme Court last year, worked from home on the cases the court heard in January. On Tuesday, she returned to the bench. Dana Verkouteren/AP hide caption

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Dana Verkouteren/AP

Justice Ginsburg Appears Strong In First Appearance At Supreme Court This Year

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Jay Jordan, 33, is the director of the #TimeDone/Second Chances project for the nonprofit Californians for Safety and Justice. The clinic involves public defenders who volunteer to help people get their criminal charges or records reduced or expunged. Philip Cheung for NPR hide caption

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Philip Cheung for NPR

Scrubbing The Past To Give Those With A Criminal Record A Second Chance

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A section of border wall separates Tijuana, Mexico, from San Diego, as seen from the U.S. in January. California has filed a lawsuit along with 15 other states, calling President Trump's use of a national emergency declaration to redirect money toward border wall construction unconstitutional. Gregory Bull/AP hide caption

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Gregory Bull/AP

Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., has vowed to launch an investigation into whether officials at the Justice Department and the FBI were plotting a "bureaucratic coup" to oust President Trump. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

British politician Luciana Berger speaks Monday at a news conference to announce the formation of the Independent Group, as seven British members of Parliament quit the Labour Party because of its approach to Brexit and anti-Semitism. Kirsty Wigglesworth/AP hide caption

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Kirsty Wigglesworth/AP

Andrew McCabe talked about his new memoir with NPR's Morning Edition. Amr Alfiky/NPR hide caption

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Amr Alfiky/NPR

Andrew McCabe, Ex-FBI Deputy, Describes 'Remarkable' Number Of Trump-Russia Contacts

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A legal battle is expected to come down to one question: Is it constitutional for the president to ignore Congress' decision not to give him all the money he wants for a Southern border wall, like that at Tijuana, Mexico, and, instead get it by declaring a national emergency? Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Trump's National Emergency Sets Up Legal Fight Over Spending Authority

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A young man and a little girl look at the border fence from Playas de Tijuana, Mexico. Photojournalist Ariana Drehsler has been covering the caravan of migrants for weeks. In December, Customs and Border Protection agents began pulling her over for questioning each time she crossed back into the U.S. Ariana Drehsler for NPR hide caption

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Ariana Drehsler for NPR

William Barr, pictured during a meeting on Capitol Hill on Jan. 9, has been sworn in as the attorney general of the United States. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

In this 2015 photo, Koyuki Higashi (left) and Hiroko Masuhara celebrate and hold up their same-sex marriage certificate in Tokyo. Today 13 gay couples filed a lawsuit arguing the country's general rejection of same-sex marriage rights violates the constitution. Christopher Jue/Getty Images hide caption

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Christopher Jue/Getty Images

Paul Manafort arrives for a hearing at U.S. District Court on June 15, 2018, in Washington, D.C. A judge said Wednesday he intentionally lied to the special counsel's office. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

Manafort Intentionally Lied To Special Counsel, Judge Says

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The SEC has accused a former Apple executive of using advance information about the company's finances to sell off stock and avoid losses. Here, stock numbers for Apple are displayed on a screen at the Nasdaq MarketSite in Times Square last month in New York City. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Maria Ressa, center, stands on stage at a 2018 New Year's Eve celebration in New York's Times Square. Ressa, the head of a news site in the Philippines, was arrested on Wednesday in Manila. Joe Russo/Invision/AP hide caption

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Joe Russo/Invision/AP

Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei met with a group of the air force staff in Tehran on Friday. An American woman has been charged with allegedly spying for Iran. AP hide caption

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AP

Ex-Air Force Counterintelligence Agent Charged With Giving Secrets To Iran

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