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In surveillance video, an unarmed black man Markeis McGlockton (far left) is shot by Michael Drejka, who is white, during an altercation a the parking lot in Clearwater, Fla., in July 2018. Pinellas County Sheriff's Office via AP hide caption

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Pinellas County Sheriff's Office via AP

Abortion protesters attempt to hand out literature as they stand in the driveway of a Planned Parenthood clinic in Indianapolis on Aug. 16. Michael Conroy/AP hide caption

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Michael Conroy/AP

Planned Parenthood Withdraws From Title X Program Over Trump Abortion Rule

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California's new lethal force bill "changes the culture of policing," Assemblywoman Shirley Weber said Monday. She's seen here in April, alongside Assemblyman Kevin McCarty, the bill's co-author. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP

Calif. Gov. Newsom Expected To Sign Bill Limiting Police Use Of Deadly Force

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U.S. Attorney William McSwain criticized Philadelphia's district attorney for fostering what he called a "new culture of disrespect for law enforcement" after a gunman shot six officers during an hours-long standoff with authorities. Jacqueline Larma/AP hide caption

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Jacqueline Larma/AP

A Court of Appeals ruled that "the odor of marijuana coupled with possession of what is clearly less than ten grams ... does not grant officers probable cause" to search and arrest a person. Gerald Herbert/AP hide caption

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Gerald Herbert/AP

A screenshot from video recently released by the Colorado Springs Police Department, which captured the moments before De'Von Bailey ran from police and was shot in the back on Aug. 3. He later died from his injuries. Photo by Colorado Springs Police Department. hide caption

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Photo by Colorado Springs Police Department.

A Royal Marine patrol vessel is seen beside Iran's Grace 1 tanker in the British territory of Gibraltar on July 4. The tanker was impounded, and the U.S. Justice Department applied to seize it, according to the Gibraltar government. Marcos Moreno/AP hide caption

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Marcos Moreno/AP

More than half of immigrants detained by the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement are housed in remote rural prisons, according to a new NPR analysis, about 52%. That number is increasing. Gary Waters/Ikon/Getty Images hide caption

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Gary Waters/Ikon/Getty Images

Unequal Outcomes: Most ICE Detainees Held In Rural Areas Where Deportation Risks Soar

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A woman prays at a makeshift memorial for shooting victims at the Cielo Vista Mall Walmart, in El Paso, Texas. Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images

After El Paso Shooting, Suburban Houston Voters Reexamine Their Own Views On Guns

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Steven Hoffenberg was arrested by FBI agents in Arkansas in 1996, after regulators accused him of defrauding investors. Danny Johnston/AP hide caption

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Danny Johnston/AP

Jeffrey Epstein's Former Business Associate: I Want To Assist Victims

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Police surround a home in North Philadelphia where a gunman wounded officers who tried to serve a drug warrant. Bastiaan Slabbers/Reuters hide caption

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Bastiaan Slabbers/Reuters

A lawsuit filed Wednesday in New York County Supreme Court alleged an associate of Jeffrey Epstein brought Jennifer Araoz to Epstein's mansion in Manhattan, where Araoz was sexually abused. Scott Heins/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Heins/Getty Images

New York Assemblywoman Yuh-Line Niou talks about the sexual abuse she experienced as a child while explaining her vote for the Child Victims Act at the state Capitol in Albany on Jan. 28, 2019. Hans Pennink/AP hide caption

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Hans Pennink/AP

Adult Victims Of Childhood Sex Abuse In New York Can Sue Alleged Abusers

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The warden of the Metropolitan Correctional Center in New York City has been reassigned and two others suspended pending official investigations, the Justice Department said. Mark Lennihan/ASSOCIATED PRESS hide caption

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Mark Lennihan/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Ken Cuccinelli, the acting director of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, said Monday at the White House that immigrants legally in the U.S. may no longer be eligible for green cards if they use food stamps, Medicaid and other public benefits. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Immigration Chief: 'Give Me Your Tired, Your Poor Who Can Stand On Their Own 2 Feet'

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