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Employers are still dealing with administrative chaos caused by ransomware attack on Ultimate Kronos Group last month. SOPA Images/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Gett hide caption

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SOPA Images/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Gett

Former Chicago police officer Jason Van Dyke is set to be released a little more than 39 months after being sent to prison for the 2014 shooting of Laquan McDonald. Antonio Perez/Chicago Tribune via Associated Press hide caption

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Antonio Perez/Chicago Tribune via Associated Press

The campus of Georgetown University in Washington, DC. Georgetown University and several other schools including Yale, MIT, and Notre Dame were named in a lawsuit alleging that they colluded to limit financial aid. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

The financial aid conspiracy; plus, 'For Colored Nerds'

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A federal judge on Friday ordered Martin Shkreli, seen here in 2016, to return $64.6 million in profits he and his former company reaped from inflating the price of the lifesaving drug Daraprim and barred him from participating in the pharmaceutical industry for the rest of his life. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Sirhan Sirhan is seen arriving for a parole hearing in August 2021 in San Diego. On Thursday, California Gov. Gavin Newsom blocked the parole recommendation for Sirhan, who killed Robert F. Kennedy in 1968. California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation/via AP hide caption

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California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation/via AP

Stewart Rhodes, founder of the Oath Keepers, speaks during a 2017 rally outside the White House. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Oath Keepers leader arrested, charged with seditious conspiracy for Jan. 6 riot

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The Supreme Court's vote to invalidate the vaccine-or-test regulation was 6 to 3, along ideological lines. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Supreme Court blocks Biden's vaccine-or-test mandate for large private companies

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The Virginia Beach Police Department used forged DNA evidence in at least five interrogations, the state's Attorney General announced this week. Eric Baradat/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Eric Baradat/AFP via Getty Images

Britain's Prince Andrew, Duke of York, attends the ceremonial funeral procession of Britain's Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, to St. George's Chapel in Windsor Castle in April 2021. Chris Jackson/Pool/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Chris Jackson/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

Amtrak reached a settlement after the Justice Department said the company failed to make stations in its intercity rail transportation system accessible, including to wheelchair users. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

The gurney in the the execution chamber at the Oklahoma State Penitentiary in McAlester, Okla., shown in 2014. Two Oklahoma death row inmates facing executions in the coming months offered firing squad as a less problematic alternative to the state's three-drug lethal injection, one of their attorneys told a federal judge on Monday. Sue Ogrocki/AP hide caption

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Sue Ogrocki/AP

Darrell Brooks, left, speaks with a lawyer during a court appearance on Nov. 23, 2021 in Waukesha County Court in Waukesha, Wis. Brooks is now facing new charges related to the Christmas parade tragedy. Mark Hoffman/AP hide caption

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Mark Hoffman/AP

A federal judge on Tuesday allowed an antitrust lawsuit filed by the Federal Trade Commission to proceed, coming after the agency's first complaint was dismissed. Tony Avelar/AP hide caption

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Tony Avelar/AP

Two Los Angeles Police Department officers were fired for playing the game Pokémon Go instead of responding to a robbery call in 2017. Here, a smartphone displays the Pokémon Go app in 2016. Nicolas Maeterlinck/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Nicolas Maeterlinck/AFP via Getty Images

The Justice Department building on a foggy morning in 2019 in Washington, D.C. Samuel Corum/Getty Images hide caption

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Samuel Corum/Getty Images

The Justice Department will create domestic terrorism unit to counter rising threats

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An image from a Los Angeles police officer's body-worn camera shows the pilot of a small plane being dragged to safety after his aircraft crash-landed in the path of an oncoming commuter train. LAPD/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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LAPD/Screenshot by NPR

The Supreme Court heard challenges Friday to the Biden administration efforts to increase the nation's vaccination rate against COVID-19. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Supreme Court's conservatives cast cloud over vaccine-or-test mandate for businesses

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