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Protesters gather outside the entrance to a rally for then-President Donald Trump in June in Tulsa, Okla. A new state law increases penalties for protesters who block public roadways and grants legal immunity to drivers who unintentionally harm them as they try to flee. Amanda Voisard/The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Amanda Voisard/The Washington Post via Getty Images

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled against placing curbs on sentencing juveniles to life in prison without parole. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Supreme Court Rejects Restrictions On Life Without Parole For Juveniles

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The Democratic lawmakers' recusal letter comes at an awkward time for Justice Amy Coney Barrett after reports of her receiving a $2 million advance for a book deal. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Vanita Gupta appears during her confirmation hearing last month before the Senate Judiciary Committee. The Senate voted to confirm Gupta as associate attorney general in a 51-49 vote. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Protesters gather in New York City in February 2019 to advocate for the decriminalization of sex trades in the city and state. The Manhattan District Attorney's Office announced more than two years later it would stop prosecuting prostitution and seek the dismissal of hundreds of related cases dating back decades. Erik McGregor/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Erik McGregor/LightRocket via Getty Images

Columbus, Ohio, Mayor Andrew Ginther speaks during a news conference Wednesday about the fatal police shooting of 16-year-old Ma'Khia Bryant on Tuesday. Columbus Public Safety Director Ned Pettus (left) and interim Police Chief Michael Woods listen. Andrew Welsh-Huggins/AP hide caption

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Andrew Welsh-Huggins/AP

People celebrate at George Floyd Square in Minneapolis after the guilty verdict in the Derek Chauvin murder trial on Tuesday. Stephen Maturen/Getty Images hide caption

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Stephen Maturen/Getty Images

Activist: Convictions In George Floyd's Death Could Represent 'A Huge Paradigm Shift'

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Derek Chauvin, seen here in a booking photo, faces sentencing in June. The former Minneapolis police officer was convicted of murder and manslaughter in George Floyd's death. Minnesota Department of Corrections via AP hide caption

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Minnesota Department of Corrections via AP

An image from a police body camera shows bystanders outside Cup Foods in Minneapolis on May 25, 2020. The group includes Darnella Frazier, third from right, as she made a 10-minute recording of George Floyd's death. Minneapolis Police Department via AP hide caption

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Minneapolis Police Department via AP

Attorney General Merrick Garland announces a Justice Department probe of possible patterns of excessive force and discrimination by the Minneapolis Police Department on Wednesday. Andrew Harnik/Pool/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

DOJ To Investigate Minneapolis Police Over Possible Patterns Of Excessive Force

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People gather at George Floyd Square in Minneapolis. On Tuesday, police officer Derek Chauvin was found guilty of two murder charges and one manslaughter charge in the death of George Floyd. Brandon Bell/Getty Images hide caption

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Brandon Bell/Getty Images

Philonise Floyd (left) and attorney Ben Crump react after a guilty verdict was announced at the trial of former Minneapolis police Officer Derek Chauvin for the murder of Floyd's brother George Floyd Julio Cortez/AP hide caption

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Julio Cortez/AP

Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison, here in September, praised the witnesses and jurors in the Derek Chauvin trial on Tuesday. Stephen Maturen/Getty Images hide caption

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Stephen Maturen/Getty Images

A sign at a June 2020 protest against racial injustice and police violence in Seattle bears the names of people killed by police. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

People gather outside the Hennepin County Courthouse in Minneapolis on Tuesday before the jury's decision returning guilty verdicts against former police officer Derek Chauvin. Kerem Yucel/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Kerem Yucel/AFP via Getty Images

A protester holds a sign across the street from the Hennepin County Government Center in Minneapolis on April 6 during the trial of former police officer Derek Chauvin. The testimony ran for three weeks. Jim Mone/AP hide caption

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Jim Mone/AP

Former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin is taken into custody as his attorney, Eric Nelson, looks on after the verdicts were read on Tuesday at Chauvin's trial for the 2020 death of George Floyd. Court TV/AP hide caption

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Court TV/AP

President Biden meets with members of the Congressional Black Caucus in the Oval Office of the White House on April 13. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Looming Chauvin Verdict Will Test Biden's Leadership On Race

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House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (right) speaks outside the U.S. Capitol in March with other members of the U.S. House of Representatives, the size of which has stayed at 435 voting members for decades. Eric Baradat/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Eric Baradat/AFP via Getty Images

Stuck At 435 Representatives? Why The U.S. House Hasn't Grown With Census Counts

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