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Are the justices of the U.S Supreme Court ready to overturn the power of state courts to oversee congressional elections in the states? Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Supreme Court to hear controversial election-law case

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Santonastasso Enterprises, which owns and operates 13 McDonald's franchises in and around Pittsburgh, Pa., paid a civil penalty of $57,332 for violating child labor laws, according to the Department of Labor. Matthias Schrader/AP hide caption

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Matthias Schrader/AP

In this Nov. 2, 2010, file photo, then Florida Republican congressional candidate David Rivera speaks in Coral Gables, Fla. Federal authorities say Rivera broke the law in his dealings with Venezuela's state-run oil company. Alan Diaz/AP hide caption

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Alan Diaz/AP

Former U.S. President Donald Trump speaks at the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) at the Hilton Anatole on Aug. 06 in Dallas, Texas. Brandon Bell/Getty Images hide caption

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Brandon Bell/Getty Images

Former President Donald Trump's company is found guilty of criminal tax fraud

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Over a span of years, Hertz falsely accused more than 360 people of stealing rental cars, leading to arrests and jail time for innocent customers. Now, the company will pay $168 million in a settlement. Cindy Ord/Getty Images hide caption

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Cindy Ord/Getty Images

Taylor Swift poses with her trophies at the 50th Annual American Music Awards in Los Angeles in November, just days after the botched ticket presale. Valerie Macon/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Valerie Macon/AFP via Getty Images

Mourners gather outside Club Q to visit a memorial, which has been moved from a sidewalk outside of police tape that was surrounding the club, on Friday, Nov. 25, 2022, in Colorado Spring, Colo. Parker Seibold/AP hide caption

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Parker Seibold/AP

Lorie Smith, the owner of 303 Creative, a website design company in Colorado, speaks Monday to reporters outside of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

Supreme Court hears case of web designer who doesn't want to work on same-sex weddings

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A missing persons flyer, bearing the name of Annie Le, shown here in New Haven, Conn., in September 2009. This year, the Columbia Journalism Review (CJR) launched a new tool that allows users to openly share their "press value" with the world if they were to go missing. Thomas Cain/Associated Press hide caption

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Thomas Cain/Associated Press
Stefani Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

Supreme Court hears clash between LGBTQ and business owners' rights

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Lachlan Murdoch is set to be deposed in the $1.6 billion defamation lawsuit against Fox News Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Dominion to depose Fox boss Lachlan Murdoch as defamation suit heats up

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Zooey Zephyr, state Rep.-elect for the 100th district of the Montana House of Representatives, is the first openly trans woman to be elected in the state legislature. Zephyr poses for a portrait at the JW Marriott Hotel in Washington D.C., on Dec. 2, 2022. Keren Carrión/NPR hide caption

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Keren Carrión/NPR

After record election year, some LGBTQ lawmakers face a new challenge: GOP majorities

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Axel Cox, 24, of Gulfport, Miss., was charged with violating the Fair Housing Act after burning a cross in front of a Black family because of their race. Mississippi Department of Corrections via AP hide caption

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Mississippi Department of Corrections via AP

Crosses, flowers and other memorabilia form a make-shift memorial for the victims of the shootings at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

A federal appeals court says a lower court must dismiss the case filed by former President Donald Trump challenging the court-ordered search of his Mar-a-Lago estate, seen here in August. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

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Steve Helber/AP

Jacob Wohl, pictured here surrounded by police officers at a 2020 protest in Washington D.C., is one of two right-wing activists who were behind a 2020 robocall scheme that targeted minority voters. Wohl will now face probation, fines and 500 hours of voter registration assistance for pleading guilty to telecommunications fraud. Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images