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Special Counsel Robert Mueller Secures Another Guilty Plea

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The U.S. Supreme Court is shown on Dec. 4, 2017, in Washington, D.C. The court, continuing a years-long pattern, has declined to hear a constitutional challenge to a state gun law. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

'New York Magazine': Do You Believe Anita Hill Now?

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Gun Safety Advocates Look To Kansas Lawmakers

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The Russia Investigations: Reading Into Mueller's Latest Indictments

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Following Mueller Indictments Targeting Russians, Moscow Maintains Denial

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Barbershop: History Of Immigration Politics

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In this July 10, 2014, photo, Bobby Bostic is photographed in the visitation room at Crossroads Correctional Center in Cameron, Mo. A former St. Louis judge who sentenced Bostic, then a teenager, to 241 years in prison, says she regrets her ruling and is asking the U.S. Supreme Court to give him the opportunity for reform. Robert Cohen/St. Louis Post-Dispatch via AP hide caption

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Robert Cohen/St. Louis Post-Dispatch via AP

She Sentenced A Teen To 241 Years In Prison. Now She Wants Her Decision Overturned

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The office of Justice Department special counsel Robert Mueller says 13 Russians and three Russian entities took part in a broad information war against the United States. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Grand Jury Indicts Russians Linked To Interference In 2016 Election

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Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, during a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing last December. Grassley had stinging words Thursday for Attorney General Jeff Sessions, who opposes a birpartisan bill that would reduce some mandatory minimum drug sentences. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Trump Uses MS-13 To 'Sell Draconian Overhauls Of Border Issues,' Journalist Says

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Raphael Sanchez, a chief counsel for U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, has been charged with stealing immigrants' identities. The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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The Washington Post/Getty Images

Ramona Morales, 79, had to pay about $6,000 in legal bills on top of a fine because one of her tenants kept chickens in the backyard of a rental house. Some Southern California cities are prosecuting code violators and slapping homeowners with gigantic legal bills they can't afford to pay. Jessica Chou for NPR hide caption

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Jessica Chou for NPR

Some California Cities Criminalize Nuisance Code Violations

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N.Y. Judge Awards $6.7 Million To Artists Whose Graffiti Was Destroyed

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