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Volunteer observers keep watch Friday as election workers at tables examine ballots during a hand recount of votes cast in Palm Beach County for the U.S. Senate race. Michele Eve Sandberg/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Michele Eve Sandberg/AFP/Getty Images

President Trump said Saturday that he is not considering extraditing a dissident whom Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan accuses of involvement in a failed coup. Tatyana Zenkovich/AP hide caption

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Tatyana Zenkovich/AP

Protesters gathered Wednesday in Dublin to denounce the Irish legal system's treatment of women who said they had been sexually assaulted. Niall Carson/PA Images via Getty Images hide caption

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Niall Carson/PA Images via Getty Images

George T. Conway III, husband of White House counselor Kellyanne Conway, at the 2017 Easter Egg Roll at the White House. Conway says he no longer feels comfortable being a Republican. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Maria Butina, a Russian woman who has been in custody since the summer facing charges that she is a foreign agent, may conclude a plea agreement with prosecutors. STR/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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STR/AFP/Getty Images

CNN attorney Ted Boutrous delivers remarks outside U.S. District Court following a hearing Wednesday on CNN's case against the White House for stripping a reporter of his press pass. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Judge Rules In Favor Of CNN, Temporarily Restores Correspondent's Credential

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Julian Assange speaks to the media from the balcony of the Ecuadorian Embassy in London last year. Jack Taylor/Getty Images hide caption

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Jack Taylor/Getty Images

Court Filing Suggests Prosecutors Are Preparing Charges Against Julian Assange

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Ted Olson, one of the lawyers representing CNN in a case against the Trump administration, helped NPR's Nina Totenberg when she was frozen out of the Justice Department in the early 1980s. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

The Senate has confirmed a number of judges nominated by President Trump to the federal bench, including two additions to the Supreme Court. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

CNN's Jim Acosta walks into federal court in Washington on Wednesday to attend a hearing on a legal challenge against the Trump administration. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

Decision Delayed To Friday In CNN Suit Over White House Revoking Acosta's Press Pass

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Sen. Jeff Flake, R-Ariz. (left), and Sen. Chris Coons, D-Del., speak to members of the media during a news conference Wednesday on the Special Counsel Independence and Integrity Act. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

President Trump speaks in the Roosevelt Room of the White House Wednesday as he announces his support for the first major rewrite of the nation's criminal justice sentencing laws in a generation. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker's appointment was legal, a Justice Department memo concluded on Wednesday. Critics call it "unconstitutional" because he wasn't confirmed by the Senate. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

A member of the Volusia County Sheriff's Office holds an electrical switch device, part of the "bomb-making paraphernalia" recovered from a home in Lake Helen, Fla., where the explosive TATP was also found. Volusia County Sheriff's Office hide caption

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Volusia County Sheriff's Office

Tyler Barriss at a preliminary hearing in May 2018 for the "swatting" death of Andrew Finch in late December of 2017. Bo Rader/The Wichita Eagle via Getty Images hide caption

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Bo Rader/The Wichita Eagle via Getty Images

U.S. Rep. Bruce Poliquin, R-Maine, has filed a lawsuit to overturn Maine's ranked-choice voting system. Votes are still being counted in Poliquin's race, but it's possible he will lose a recount under the recently approved system. Robert F. Bukaty/AP hide caption

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Robert F. Bukaty/AP

In Tight Race, Maine Republican Sues To Block State's Ranked-Choice Voting Law

Maine Public

Rep. Bruce Poliquin's lawsuit claims the state's ranked-choice voting law violates the U.S. Constitution because the candidate who gets the most votes may not ultimately be declared the winner.