Law NPR stories on legal issues, court rulings, Supreme Court hearings, new laws and government investigations. Download the NPR Justice Talking podcast and subscribe to the Legal Affairs RSS feed.

Law

Washington Gov. Jay Inslee speaks in support of firearm restrictions in 2017, as his wife, Trudi, looks on. The initiative passed, but some Washington state sheriffs are refusing to enforce all the measures. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Ted S. Warren/AP

When Sheriffs Won't Enforce The Law

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/696400737/696636224" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Jussie Smollett leaves the Cook County Jail following his release Thursday in Chicago. Smollett was charged with filling a false police report after he said he was attacked by two men who shouted racist and anti-gay slurs. Kamil Krzaczynski/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Kamil Krzaczynski/AP

Jussie Smollett 'Took Advantage Of The Pain And Anger Of Racism,' Police Say

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/696593870/696604920" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Mark Harris, Republican candidate in North Carolina's 9th Congressional District race, prepares to testify on Thursday, the fourth day of the State Board of Elections hearing. Travis Long/Pool/News & Observer hide caption

toggle caption
Travis Long/Pool/News & Observer

New Election Called In North Carolina House Race

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/696561080/696769960" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Actor and singer Jussie Smollett, seen at an Empire event in 2016, has been charged with disorderly conduct for allegedly filing a false police report about being the victim of a bias-motivated attack. Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP

British politicians Heidi Allen, Sarah Wollaston and Anna Soubry (from left to right) announced Wednesday that they were breaking away from their party to join the newly formed, more centrist Independent Group. Alastair Grant/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Alastair Grant/AP

Crews remove early morning snow during a winter storm at the Supreme Court on Wednesday. It's not unusual for the high court to be open when the rest of Washington is closed. Jessica Gresko/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Jessica Gresko/AP

Supreme Court Limits Civil Asset Forfeiture, Rules Excessive Fines Apply To States

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/696360090/696532435" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Mark Harris, Republican candidate in North Carolina's 9th Congressional race, fights back tears at the conclusion of his son John Harris's testimony during the third day of a North Carolina State Board of Elections hearing on the 9th Congressional District voting irregularities. Travis Long/News & Observer / Pool hide caption

toggle caption
Travis Long/News & Observer / Pool

Pope Francis has called Catholic leaders from around the world to the Vatican this week for a meeting about clergy sexual abuse. Gregorio Borgia/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Gregorio Borgia/AP

As Pope Holds Sex Abuse Summit, U.S. Catholics Not Hopeful For 'Bold Moves'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/696051008/696206356" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Mark Schand scoops ice cream at his Sweetwater smoothie cafe in New Britain, Conn. This business is meant to reboot a career Schand says was stolen from him at the age of 19 when he was wrongfully convicted of a crime and was imprisoned for 27 years. Karen Brown/NEPR hide caption

toggle caption
Karen Brown/NEPR

Plotted From A Prison Cot, Wrongly Accused Man Whips Smoothie Dream Into Reality

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/693465365/696172569" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Houston Police Chief Art Acevedo said criminal charges will be filed "against whoever is appropriate" on his department, following a drug bust that resulted in the deaths of two suspects. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Roger Stone has been ordered to appear in court on Thursday following an Instagram post that criticized the judge in his case. The judge may reconsider her gag order or Stone's bail. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Ginsburg, sketched here with the rest of the Supreme Court last year, worked from home on the cases the court heard in January. On Tuesday, she returned to the bench. Dana Verkouteren/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Dana Verkouteren/AP

Justice Ginsburg Appears Strong In First Appearance At Supreme Court This Year

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/695773628/696075343" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Jay Jordan, 33, is the director of the #TimeDone/Second Chances project for the nonprofit Californians for Safety and Justice. The clinic involves public defenders who volunteer to help people get their criminal charges or records reduced or expunged. Philip Cheung for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Philip Cheung for NPR

Scrubbing The Past To Give Those With A Criminal Record A Second Chance

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/692322738/695874104" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A section of border wall separates Tijuana, Mexico, from San Diego, as seen from the U.S. in January. California has filed a lawsuit along with 15 other states, calling President Trump's use of a national emergency declaration to redirect money toward border wall construction unconstitutional. Gregory Bull/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Gregory Bull/AP

Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., has vowed to launch an investigation into whether officials at the Justice Department and the FBI were plotting a "bureaucratic coup" to oust President Trump. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

toggle caption
J. Scott Applewhite/AP

British politician Luciana Berger speaks Monday at a news conference to announce the formation of the Independent Group, as seven British members of Parliament quit the Labour Party because of its approach to Brexit and anti-Semitism. Kirsty Wigglesworth/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Kirsty Wigglesworth/AP

Andrew McCabe talked about his new memoir with NPR's Morning Edition. Amr Alfiky/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Amr Alfiky/NPR

Andrew McCabe, Ex-FBI Deputy, Describes 'Remarkable' Number Of Trump-Russia Contacts

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/695112668/695638044" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A legal battle is expected to come down to one question: Is it constitutional for the president to ignore Congress' decision not to give him all the money he wants for a Southern border wall, like that at Tijuana, Mexico, and, instead get it by declaring a national emergency? Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mario Tama/Getty Images

Trump's National Emergency Sets Up Legal Fight Over Spending Authority

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/695321387/695369043" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">