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Demonstrators stand outside a security zone in Richmond, Va., on Monday. Thousands of activists and gun enthusiasts converged on the city to urge the state not to pass new gun laws. Tyrone Turner/WAMU hide caption

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Tyrone Turner/WAMU

Richmond Gun Rally: Thousands Of Gun Owners Converge On Virginia Capitol On MLK Day

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Bryan Stevenson is the author of the memoir Just Mercy, which was recently adapted into a film starring Michael B. Jordan. Rog Walker/Paper Monday hide caption

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Rog Walker/Paper Monday

'Just Mercy' Attorney Asks U.S. To Reckon With Its Racist Past And Present

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Brock Ervin holds a sign outside the Indiana House chamber before the 11 representatives of the Electoral College gathered on Dec. 19, 2016, in Indianapolis. The U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to hear two cases challenging state attempts to penalize Electoral College delegates who fail to vote for the presidential candidate they were pledged to support. Darron Cummings/AP hide caption

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Darron Cummings/AP

From left: Luke Austin Lane, Jacob Kaderli and Michael Helterbrand are accused of plotting "to overthrow the government and murder a Bartow County couple," according to police in Floyd County, Ga. AP hide caption

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AP

A joint investigation involving the U.S., Germany, the Netherlands, Northern Ireland and the United Kingdom helped take down the WeLeakInfo site, which the Justice Department says sold billions of stolen usernames, passwords and other data. U.S. Department of Justice hide caption

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U.S. Department of Justice

A view of Jeffrey Epstein's mansion on Little St. James Island. Prosecutors filed a civil lawsuit that accuses Epstein of human trafficking that victimized young women and children as young as 11. Gabriel Lopez Albarran/AP hide caption

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Gabriel Lopez Albarran/AP

Former Canadian military reservist Patrik Jordan Mathews and two Americans face charges related to possessing an illegal assault rifle, as part of an extremist group called The Base. Mathews is seen here in an undated picture from the Royal Canadian Mounted Police in Winnipeg, Manitoba, last August. RCMP Manitoba/via Reuters hide caption

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RCMP Manitoba/via Reuters

Lev Parnas (left) says text messages last year between him and congressional candidate Robert Hyde about surveilling former Ambassador Marie Yovanovitch were taken out of context. But Ukrainian police are investigating the allegations. Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images

"OK, boomer" made its first appearance in the Supreme Court Wednesday, invoked by Chief Justice John Roberts, seen here in February 2019, in an age-discrimination case. Mark Humphrey/AP hide caption

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Mark Humphrey/AP

Chief Justice Roberts: Is 'OK, Boomer' Evidence Of Age Discrimination?

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The U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments Tuesday on whether to throw out the convictions of Bridget Anne Kelly and William Baroni Jr., who were convicted in the "Bridgegate" scandal. Julio Cortez/AP hide caption

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Julio Cortez/AP

When Is Abuse Of Power A Crime? Supreme Court Answer May Come In 'Bridgegate' Scandal

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Under dispute is whether the men housed at Wayside Cross Ministries reside too close to McCarty Park and its playground. Cheryl Corley/NPR hide caption

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Cheryl Corley/NPR

Russian hackers successfully infiltrated emails of employees at Burisma Holdings, a Ukrainian energy company, according to a U.S. security firm. Here, a building is seen in Kyiv that holds the offices of a Burisma subsidiary. Valentyn Ogirenko/Reuters hide caption

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Valentyn Ogirenko/Reuters

Russians Hacked Ukrainian Firm At The Center Of Impeachment

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Ken Starr, former independent counsel who investigated the Clintons, is one of several new lawyers on President Trump's impeachment defense team. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Starr, Dershowitz, Ray: Trump Leans On High-Wattage Lawyers For Impeachment

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Traffic crosses the George Washington Bridge in Fort Lee, N.J. The bridge made headlines in 2013 when two access lanes were shut down, creating gridlock — and a political scandal. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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Richard Drew/AP

At Supreme Court, Another Potential Loss For Prosecutors Fighting Public Corruption

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Defense Secretary Mark told NPR on Monday that the U.S. has the constitutional authority to strike Iranian proxies in Iraq and Iran on its home soil in retaliation for attacks on American forces. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

The Rev. Randolph Hollerith, dean of the Washington National Cathedral (from left); the Rt. Rev. Carl Wright, the Episcopal Church's bishop suffragan for the armed forces; and Maj. Gen. Steven Schaick, the Air Force chief of chaplains, participate in the blessing of a Bible for swearing in U.S. Space Force officials. Danielle E. Thomas/Washington National Cathedral hide caption

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Danielle E. Thomas/Washington National Cathedral

Attorney General William Barr announced an update in the investigation of the deadly shooting last month at a naval base in Pensacola, Fla. He said Monday: "This was an act of terrorism." Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

DMV offices around the U.S. were slowed down for hours on Monday, due to a network outage in a key database. Here, people wait at the New York State Department of Motor Vehicles office in Brooklyn last month. Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images