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Darrell Cannon was tortured into confessing to a crime he didn't commit and was sentenced to life in prison. He was exonerated in 2004 and released from prison in 2007. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Reparations For Police Brutality

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Ghislaine Maxwell has been arrested on charges that she helped Jeffrey Epstein recruit underage girls for sexual abuse. The two are seen here in 2005. Joe Schildhorn/Patrick McMullan via Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Schildhorn/Patrick McMullan via Getty Images

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., and the GOP majority have confirmed 200 judicial nominees by President Trump. It's a record that will affect U.S. law for decades. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Wave Of Young Judges Pushed By McConnell Will Be 'Ruling For Decades To Come'

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Tourists visit Mount Rushmore National Monument on Wednesday. President Trump is expected to visit the federal monument in South Dakota and give a speech before a fireworks display on Friday. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Chad Wolf, acting secretary of the Department of Homeland Security, outside the White House in Washington, D.C., last week. Stefani Reynolds/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Stefani Reynolds/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Tables are marked with X's for social distancing in the outdoor dining area of a restaurant in Los Angeles, Wednesday. California Gov. Gavin Newsom has ordered a three-week closure of bars and indoor operations of restaurants and certain other businesses in Los Angeles and 18 other counties as the state copes with increasing cases of COVID-19. Jae C. Hong/AP hide caption

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Jae C. Hong/AP

Amber England, who led the successful campaign for a ballot initiative to give 200,000 more Oklahomans health coverage, talked with supporters online this week. Voters narrowly approved the Medicaid expansion measure Tuesday, despite opposition by the state's governor and legislature. Sue Ogrocki/AP hide caption

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Sue Ogrocki/AP

Police confront protesters in front of the Barclays Center in Brooklyn, NY, on May 29, 2020. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Lawyers Charged With Seven Felonies In Molotov Cocktail Attack Out On Bail

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New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio, shown here at an event last month, defended the move to shift funds away from the city's police department. John Minchillo/AP hide caption

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John Minchillo/AP

Officers in Aurora, Colo., face off with protesters over Elijah McClain's death outside police headquarters Saturday at the Aurora Municipal Center. The department says it's investigating photos that officers took at a memorial site for McClain, who died in police custody in 2019. Andy Cross/MediaNews Group/The Denver Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Andy Cross/MediaNews Group/The Denver Post via Getty Images
Andrew Harnik/AP

Supreme Court: Montana Can't Exclude Religious Schools From Scholarship Program

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The Supreme Court ruled on Monday, in a 5-4 decision, a Louisiana law that required doctors performing abortions to have admitting privileges to nearby hospitals unconstitutional. Michael A. McCoy/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael A. McCoy/Getty Images

After SCOTUS Decision, The Future Of Abortion Rights; Mask Mandates

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The four former Minneapolis police officers facing charges in George Floyd's death include Derek Chauvin (from left), J. Alexander Kueng, Thomas Lane and Tou Thao. Hennepin County, Minn., Sheriff's Office via AP hide caption

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Hennepin County, Minn., Sheriff's Office via AP

President Trump is among three dozen U.S. officials for whom Iran has issued arrest warrants in the Jan. 3 airstrike killing of Maj. Gen. Qassem Soleimani. Doug Mills/The New York Times/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Doug Mills/The New York Times/Bloomberg via Getty Images

A masked protester kneels before San Jose police in San Jose, Calif. last month. Four officers have been placed on administrative leave after allegations that they posted racist and anti-Muslim messages to social media. Ben Margot/AP hide caption

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Ben Margot/AP

Golden State Killer suspect Joseph James DeAngelo (center) pleaded guilty on Monday in Sacramento, Calif., to 13 murders and other related charges. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP

The Supreme Court effectively refused to block the execution of four federal prison inmates who are scheduled to be put to death in the coming weeks. The executions would be the first use of the death penalty at the federal level since 2003. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP