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People demonstrate in June in Los Angeles in favor of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program. Immigrant rights advocates hailed a Friday court ruling allowing new applications as a "huge victory for people who have been waiting to apply for DACA for the first time." Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

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Damian Dovarganes/AP

Baratunde Thurston: How To Citizen

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Federal lawmakers introduced an joint resolution that seeks "to prohibit the use of slavery and involuntary servitude as a punishment for a crime" under the 13th Amendment to the Constitution. bonniej/Getty Images hide caption

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bonniej/Getty Images

The thumbs-up Like logo on a sign at Facebook headquarters in Menlo Park, Calif. The Justice Dept. is suing the company for allegedly discriminating against U.S. workers in favor of temporary visa holders. Jeff Chiu/AP hide caption

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Jeff Chiu/AP

Kyle Rittenhouse is accused of killing two protesters days after Jacob Blake was shot by police in Kenosha, Wis. A judge ruled there is enough probable cause in his case to proceed to trial. Courtesy Antioch Police Department /AP hide caption

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Courtesy Antioch Police Department /AP

President Trump listens during a ceremony Thursday to present the Presidential Medal of Freedom to former college football coach Lou Holtz in the Oval Office. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

In His Final Weeks, Trump Could Dole Out Many Pardons To Friends, Allies

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Last year, at the future site of the California Indian Heritage Center in Sacramento, Gov. Gavin Newsom, left, with Assemblyman James Ramos, formally apologized to tribal leaders across the state for the violence, mistreatment and neglect inflicted on Native Americans throughout California history. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP

With 1 Of Their Own In The Statehouse, Native Americans In California Win New Rights

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A service dog onboard a United Airlines plane at Newark Liberty International Airport in 2017. The Department of Transportation says it will require service dogs to be flown free of charge, but not emotional support animals. Julio Cortez/AP hide caption

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Julio Cortez/AP

Virginia's Campbell County is pushing back on Gov. Ralph Northam's coronavirus restrictions, saying they violate individual rights. Here, Northam removes his mask during a COVID-19 briefing last month in Richmond. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

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Steve Helber/AP

Supreme Court justices heard arguments in a case that asked whether the court's previous decision to bar non-unanimous jury convictions in criminal trials can be applied retroactively. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Supreme Court Weighs Whether All Non-Unanimous Jury Verdicts Are Unconstitutional

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A worker picks Cannabis inside a greenhouse on Nov. 10, in Kasese, Uganda. Uganda is one of several African countries looking to produce medical cannabis for export to Europe and America. On Wednesday, the U.N. Commission on Narcotic Drugs voted to reclassify cannabis. Luke Dray/Getty Images hide caption

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Luke Dray/Getty Images

Paul Petersen, a lawyer and former Arizona public official, was sentenced to six years in federal prison for his role in orchestrating an illegal adoption scheme involving pregnant women from the Marshall Islands. Rick Bowmer/AP hide caption

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Rick Bowmer/AP

The captain of the dive boat that caught fire last September was charged with 34 counts of seaman's manslaughter after prosecutors found his failure to follow safety rules during the three-day diving trip resulted in the death of 33 passengers and one crew member. Santa Barbara County Fire Department via AP hide caption

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Santa Barbara County Fire Department via AP
NurPhoto/NurPhoto via Getty Images

What Biden Could Do On Immigration

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Attorney General William Barr said that U.S. attorneys and the FBI have looked into specific allegations but that they have found nothing that would affect the outcome of the election. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Barr: DOJ Has No Evidence Of Fraud Affecting 2020 Election Outcome

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Activists march to Shell's headquarters in The Hague, Netherlands, in April 2019, delivering a legal summons to the company. The civil case began Tuesday, with plaintiffs demanding the company reduce its carbon dioxide emissions. Koen van Weel/ANP/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Koen van Weel/ANP/AFP via Getty Images