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Former Laurel, Md., police chief David Crawford is under arrest, facing dozens of criminal charges related to a string of arson attacks on homes and garages. Prince George's County Fire/EMS Department hide caption

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Prince George's County Fire/EMS Department

Former Secretary of Transportation Elaine Chao used her agency's resources to assist in personal errands and to help her family, according to an Office of Inspector General report. Samuel Corum/Getty Images hide caption

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Samuel Corum/Getty Images

Prosecutors say Ethan Nordean, seen with a bullhorn, led members of the far-right group the Proud Boys in the Jan. 6 riot. He faces federal charges, but will be released from custody while he awaits trial. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

Survivors of the 2018 van attack in Toronto were joined by friends and families of the victims outside the courthouse in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. The 28-year-old man responsible for the attack was found guilty Wednesday morning. Cole Burston/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Cole Burston/AFP via Getty Images

Rep. Ronny Jackson, R-Texas, failed to "treat subordinates with dignity and respect" while he was a White House physician, a Defense Department report states. The department's inspector general's office says Jackson also made sexual and denigrating statements about a female subordinate. Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

Little Italy neighborhood of San Francisco, July 2020. The city will relax coronavirus restrictions Wednesday, including the reopening of indoor dining and fitness facilities. Daniel Slim /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Slim /AFP via Getty Images

When former Parler CEO John Matze was fired from the company, he was stripped of all of his company shares, according to people familiar with his exit. picture alliance/dpa/picture alliance via Getty I hide caption

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picture alliance/dpa/picture alliance via Getty I

Eight years after carving the heart out of a landmark voting rights law, the Supreme Court heard arguments in a case that could put new limits on efforts to combat racial discrimination in voting. Matt York/AP hide caption

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Matt York/AP

Supreme Court Seems Ready To Uphold Restrictive Voting Laws

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FBI Director Christopher Wray testifies on Tuesday before the Senate Judiciary Committee about the Jan. 6 insurrection at the Capitol. Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

A bus believed to be carrying former U.S. special forces member Michael Taylor and his son Peter, who allegedly staged the operation to help fly former Nissan chief Carlos Ghosn out of Japan in 2019, leaves Narita International Airport in Japan on Tuesday. JIJI PRESS/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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JIJI PRESS/AFP via Getty Images

FBI Director Christopher Wray arrives Tuesday to testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee regarding the Jan. 6 insurrection at the Capitol. Mandel Ngan/Pool/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

The U.S. Supreme Court, where conservatives have a 6-3 majority, is to consider a case that could gut the Voting Rights Act of 1965. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

High Noon For The Future Of The Voting Rights Act At The Supreme Court

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Sexual harassment allegations made against Gov. Andrew Cuomo by two former aides will be examined by independent investigators hired by the New York state attorney general's office. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

A Capitol Police officer holds a program as people pay their respects at the remains officer Brian Sicknick, who died after defending the Capitol against the Jan. 6 insurrection. Demetrius Freeman/Pool/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Demetrius Freeman/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

A new generation of states are wrestling with how to legalize marijuana with a focus on racial equity that was missing from early legalization efforts. Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images
Manoush Zomorodi / NPR

Brent Leggs: How Can Seeing Black History As American History Begin To Make Amends?

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