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A Capitol Police officer holds a program as people pay their respects at the remains officer Brian Sicknick, who died after defending the Capitol against the Jan. 6 insurrection. Demetrius Freeman/Pool/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Demetrius Freeman/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

A new generation of states are wrestling with how to legalize marijuana with a focus on racial equity that was missing from early legalization efforts. Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images
Manoush Zomorodi / NPR

Brent Leggs: How Can Seeing Black History As American History Begin To Make Amends?

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A South Korean human rights group has detailed how North Korea's extensive prison camps ultimately fund the nation's missile and nuclear programs. Korean Central News Agency/AP hide caption

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Korean Central News Agency/AP

Renu Begum, eldest sister of Shamima Begum, holds her sister's photo as she is interviewed by the media at New Scotland Yard. The U.K. revoked Shamima Begum's British citizenship two years ago, citing security concerns. Laura Lean/WPA Pool via Getty Images hide caption

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Laura Lean/WPA Pool via Getty Images

Facebook is pushing back on new Apple privacy rules for its mobile devices, this time saying the social media giant is standing up for small businesses in television and radio advertisements and full page newspaper ads. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

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Eric Risberg/AP

Why Is Facebook Launching An All-Out War On Apple's Upcoming iPhone Update?

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TikTok on Wednesday agreed to pay $92 million to settle claims stemming from a class-action lawsuit alleging the app illegally tracked and shared the personal data of users without their consent. Kiichiro Sato/AP hide caption

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Kiichiro Sato/AP

Thousands of Trump supporters gather outside the U.S. Capitol following a Stop the Steal rally on Jan. 6. They stormed the historic building, breaking windows and clashing with police. Nearly two months later, some 250 rioters are facing charges, including Richard Michetti of Pennsylvania, whose ex-girlfriend turned him in. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

The building that houses the U.S. Attorney's Office for the Southern District of New York is pictured in 2015. Emails and text messages from prosecutors in that office have come out as part of an inquiry into their handling of a case. Mary Altaffer/AP hide caption

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Mary Altaffer/AP
Department of Justice/NPR

The Capitol Siege: The Arrested And Their Stories

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Robert Stewart was one of the first Black officers hired by LAPD. He was terminated in 1900 and on Tuesday the Los Angeles Police Commission unanimously voted to have him reinstated to retire with honor. LAPD handout hide caption

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LAPD handout

The cost of repairing or replacing historical items damaged in the Jan. 6 Capitol riot "will be considerable," Architect of the Capitol J. Brett Blanton told lawmakers Wednesday. Other costs include maintaining a security fence topped with razor wire that surrounds the U.S. Capitol grounds. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Xavier Becerra, President Biden's nominee for secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services, contended with critics of abortion rights on the first day of his confirmation hearings Tuesday. Sarah Silbiger/POOL/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Sarah Silbiger/POOL/AFP via Getty Images

Protesters gather outside the Supreme Court in Washington where the Court on Oct. 8, 2019, as the court heard arguments in the first case of LGBT rights since the retirement of Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

A U.S. federal courtroom sits empty in 2017 in Honolulu. A new study finds that judges with backgrounds as prosecutors or corporate lawyers are more likely to rule in favor of employers. Jennifer Sinco Kelleher/AP hide caption

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Jennifer Sinco Kelleher/AP

Chris Quinn, editor of cleveland.com and the Cleveland Plain Dealer, is at the forefront of a crop of news editors taking a hard look at the implications of how they have defined news. David Petkiewicz/Dave Petkiewicz/cleveland.com and The Plain Dealer hide caption

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David Petkiewicz/Dave Petkiewicz/cleveland.com and The Plain Dealer

From Cleveland To Boston, Newsrooms Revisit Old Stories To Offer A 'Fresh Start'

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A mural depicting Ahmaud Arbery in July 2020 in Brunswick, Ga. Gregory McMichael, Travis McMichael and William "Roddie" Bryan are facing murder charges in connection with his death. Sean Rayford/Getty Images hide caption

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