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News brief:Ukraine defense, COVID treatments, prisoners' early release

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A prisoner looks out of his jail window as protesters gather outside the federal detention center in Miami on June 12, 2020, during a demonstration over the death of George Floyd. Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images

Flaws plague a tool meant to help low-risk federal prisoners win early release

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Masked White Plains, N.Y., High School students walk between classes last year. A day after a judge overturned New York's mask mandate, an appellate judge temporarily restored it as the state prepares an appeal. Mark Lennihan/AP file photo hide caption

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Mark Lennihan/AP file photo

Apple CEO Tim Cook speaks during the 2018 Apple Worldwide Developer Conference (WWDC) at the San Jose Convention Center. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Rep. Terri Sewell, a Democrat from Alabama, represents the state's only Black-majority district in Congress. She's pictured here alongside Rep. Joyce Beatty, a Democrat from Ohio, and Martin Luther King III, in Washington, D.C. on Jan. 17, 2022. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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Jose Luis Magana/AP

Former Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore, right, and his attorney Julian McPhillips, left, leave the courtroom in Montgomery, Ala., on Monday following jury selection. Moore and Leigh Corfman, who accused him of sexual assault, are suing each other for defamation. Mickey Welsh/The Montgomery Advertiser/via AP hide caption

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Mickey Welsh/The Montgomery Advertiser/via AP

Abortion restrictions may tighten, when many already struggle to access the procedure

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Shane Lee Brown (left) spent six days in jail after police departments in Las Vegas and Henderson, Nev., confused him with Shane Neal Brown, an older white man and a felon. AP hide caption

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AP

In this photo provided by Pakistan's Press Information Department, Pakistan's Chief Justice Gulzar Ahmad, left, administrates the oath of office to Ayesha Malik in Islamabad, Pakistan on Monday. Malik is the first female judge to serve on Pakistan's Supreme Court. Press Information Department via AP hide caption

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Press Information Department via AP

A 2nd trial is underway in Minnesota, addressing the murder of George Floyd

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Civil rights trial begins for 3 ex-Minneapolis cops charged in George Floyd's death

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Homeless camps are often blamed for crime but experts say it's not so simple

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Former Minneapolis police officers J. Alexander Kueng, Thomas Lane and Tou Thao are charged with failing to provide medical care to George Floyd as Derek Chauvin knelt on his neck. Hennepin County Sheriff's Office/AP hide caption

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Hennepin County Sheriff's Office/AP

Supporters of Julian Assange outside the Royal Courts of Justice last month in London. Nearly two months later, London's High Court ruled that Assange can seek appeal against his extradition to the U.S. Chris J Ratcliffe/Getty Images hide caption

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Chris J Ratcliffe/Getty Images