Law NPR stories on legal issues, court rulings, Supreme Court hearings, new laws and government investigations. Download the NPR Justice Talking podcast and subscribe to the Legal Affairs RSS feed.

Law

Tuesday

Manhattan DA presents evidence in Trump-Stormy Daniels investigation to grand jury

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1152739766/1152739767" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A memorial is displayed for Tyre Nichols at the Embrace statue in Boston, Massachusetts, on January 28, 2023. Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images

Monday

The Manhattan District Attorney's Office is investigating whether former President Donald Trump broke the law with payments allegedly made to cover up an extramarital affair with adult film actress Stormy Daniels, pictured in 2018. Markus Schreiber/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Markus Schreiber/AP

An Indiana University student was less than a mile away from the Bloomington campus when she was attacked in broad daylight in what local officials called a "racially motivated attack." Darron Cummings/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Darron Cummings/AP

Sunday

The Biden administration plans to expand protections for renters

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1152387241/1152387242" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Understanding the state of antitrust enforcement in the United States

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1152387276/1152387277" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Saturday

A former police chief says more police does not mean less crime

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1152353126/1152353127" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

People rally Friday in Times Square in New York City to protest the fatal police assault of Tyre Nichols earlier this month in Memphis, Tenn. Yuki Iwamura/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Yuki Iwamura/AFP via Getty Images

A portrait of Tyre Nichols is displayed at a memorial service for him on Jan. 17 in Memphis, Tenn. Nichols died three days after Memphis police officers beat him during a traffic stop on Jan. 7. Adrian Sainz/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Adrian Sainz/AP

The U.S. farm bill is up for renewal this year. Here's what's at stake

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1152313305/1152313306" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Friday

Brianne Chapman protests outside the federal courthouse in Washington, D.C., on Friday, during the sentencing hearing for Julian Khater and George Tanios. Khater pleaded guilty to assaulting Capitol Police Officer Brian Sicknick with pepper spray on Jan. 6, 2021. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Jose Luis Magana/AP

A group pauses in 2017, with some in prayer, at a makeshift memorial on a New York City bike path that that honors victims of an attack who were stuck and killed by a rental truck driven by Sayfullo Saipov. The Islamic extremist was convicted of federal crimes on Thursday and could face the death penalty. Craig Ruttle/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Craig Ruttle/AP

Police officers, who were seen on camera beating and kicking Tyre Nichols, stand by where Nichols is slumped over on the ground. This image is a screenshot of one of the videos from graphic police body camera footage released to the public on Friday night. City of Memphis Vimeo/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

toggle caption
City of Memphis Vimeo/Screenshot by NPR