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Which Internet hoaxes got you this year? iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

We Say Goodbye To Some NPR Colleagues

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According to Paul Collins, St. Nicholas Magazine boasted a list of kid contributors that today "reads like a Pulitzer Prize roll call." Courtesy of Paul Collins hide caption

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Courtesy of Paul Collins

The Justice Department is trying to compel New York Times journalist James Risen to testify in the case of a former CIA official who may or may not have leaked classified information to him. Mark Lennihan/AP hide caption

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Mark Lennihan/AP

The massive marketing campaign for Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues has gone way beyond trailers and commercials. Some critics say the journalists are embarrassing themselves — and some say the character has become tiresomely ubiquitous. Gemma LaMana/Paramount Pictures hide caption

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Gemma LaMana/Paramount Pictures

The 'Anchorman' Legend Continues, And It's Everywhere

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BuzzFeed's content is created by both paid staff members and users of the site. Matt Haughey/Flickr hide caption

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Matt Haughey/Flickr