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Remembering NPR's Bill Deputy, A 'Guardian Of Sound'

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The Phi Kappa Psi house at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville was at the center of rape allegations contained in the Rolling Stone story. The magazine acknowledged that its reporting had been flawed, and the campus ban on the fraternity was subsequently lifted. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

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Steve Helber/AP

A statue of the scales of justice stands above the Old Bailey, the courthouse where many high-profile libel cases are tried, in London. The U.K. is a popular place for libel cases to be filed because of laws that make it difficult for journalists or the media to prevail. Dan Kitwood/Getty Images hide caption

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Dan Kitwood/Getty Images

On Libel And The Law, U.S. And U.K. Go Separate Ways

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Michael Oreskes says that he admires NPR's reportorial muscle and that the network's greatest strength can be found in its ability to tell stories that listeners find compelling, accessible and absorbing. Chuck Zoeller/AP hide caption

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Chuck Zoeller/AP

Terrence Howard (center) stars in Empire with (from left): Jussie Smollett, Serayah McNeill, Taraji P. Henson, Bryshere Gray, Grace Gealey, Trai Byers and Kaitlin Doubleday. Chuck Hodes/Fox TV hide caption

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Chuck Hodes/Fox TV

Robert Durst, filmed on the streets of Manhattan for HBO's The Jinx: The Life and Deaths of Robert Durst. HBO hide caption

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HBO

Does Success Of HBO's 'The Jinx' Herald New Form Of True-Crime TV?

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Claude Sitton, then-editor of the News & Observer, works in his office at the newspaper in Raleigh, N.C., in 1990. Sitton, who was a leader among reporters covering the civil rights movement in the South in the 1950s and '60s and later won a Pulitzer Prize for distinguished commentary, died Tuesday, March 10, 2015. He was 89. Harry Lynch/The News & Observer via AP hide caption

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Harry Lynch/The News & Observer via AP