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A recent obituary in the Chicago Tribune mourned the death of facts. But are they truly dead? iStockphoto.com hide caption

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The Death Of Facts In An Age Of 'Truthiness'

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This video grab from pooled footage shows Rupert Murdoch testifying earlier today in London. /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Philip Reeves speaks with Renee Montagne

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A video grab from pooled footage taken inside the Leveson Inquiry shows former News International executive chairman James Murdoch giving evidence at the High Court in London earlier today. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Philip Reeves on 'Morning Edition'

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Muslim community members and supporters march near 1 Police Plaza to protest the New York Police Department surveillance operations of Muslim communities, Friday, Nov. 18, 2011, in New York. Bebeto Matthews/AP hide caption

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Bebeto Matthews/AP