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Mika, Joe And The Donald: Trump's Tweets Intensify Feud With MSNBC Hosts

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Trump's Latest Tweet Is Roundly Criticized

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GOP Lawmakers Denounce Trump's Tweets Attacking 'Morning Joe' Hosts

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South Dakota Meat Producer Settles 'Pink Slime' Suit Against ABC News

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Sarah Palin, shown at Politicon 2016 last June in Pasadena, Calif., has accused The New York Times of publishing a statement about her that it "knew to be false." Colin Young-Wolff/Invision/AP hide caption

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Colin Young-Wolff/Invision/AP

Anthony Scaramucci, an adviser to President Trump, was the subject of a story posted to CNN.com that was eventually retracted. Three journalists resigned over the story, and CNN has apologized to Scaramucci. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

White House press secretary Sean Spicer departs after a briefing at the White House on Tuesday in Washington, D.C. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

The Daily White House Briefing: 'Must-See TV' With An Uncertain Future

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Jorge Santiago Aguirre, a human rights lawyer in Mexico City, clicked on a link in a text message he received last year asking for his help. Nothing happened. But days later, audio was leaked of a call between Aguirre and one of his clients. The call had been heavily edited and painted both men as criminals. James Frederick hide caption

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James Frederick

Mexico's Government Is Accused Of Targeting Journalists And Activists With Spyware

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Eli Pariser, CEO of Upworthy, speaks onstage at during the 2014 SXSW Festival in Austin, Texas. At its peak, the site, which is founded on a mission of promoting viral and uplifting content, was reaching close to 90 million people a month. Jon Shapley/Getty Images for SXSW hide caption

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Jon Shapley/Getty Images for SXSW

Upworthy Was One Of The Hottest Sites Ever. You Won't Believe What Happened Next

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NPR's Eyder Peralta Kainaz Amaria/NPR hide caption

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Kainaz Amaria/NPR

I Spent 4 Days In Jail In South Sudan. I Won't Stop Reporting On The Crisis There

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