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Medical Treatments

Bennett Markow looks to his big brother, Eli (right), during a family visit at UC Davis Children's Hospital in Sacramento. Bennett was born four months early, in November 2020. Crissa Markow hide caption

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Crissa Markow

The heartbreak and cost of losing a baby in America

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The drugmaker Amylyx is asking the FDA to approve a new medication for ALS, a fatal neurodegenerative disease. It's possible the agency could greenlight the drug by the end of the month. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

FDA seems poised to approve a new drug for ALS, but does it work?

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Simply improving our breathing can significantly lower high blood pressure at any age. Recent research finds that just five to 10 minutes daily of exercises that strengthen the diaphragm and certain other muscles does the trick. SciePro/Getty Images/Max Posner/NPR hide caption

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SciePro/Getty Images/Max Posner/NPR

Daily 'breath training' can work as well as medicine to reduce high blood pressure

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A pharmacy in New York City offers vaccines for COVID-19 and flu. Some researchers argue that the two diseases may pose similar risks of dying for those infected. Ted Shaffrey/AP hide caption

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Ted Shaffrey/AP

Scientists debate how lethal COVID is. Some say it's now less risky than flu

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President Biden speaks during an event Tuesday celebrating the passage of the Inflation Reduction Act on the South Lawn of the White House. The new law gives Medicare the power to negotiate drug prices. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

Screening mammograms, like this one in Chicago in 2012, are among a number of preventive health services the Affordable Care Act has required health plans to cover at no charge to patients. But that could change, if the Sept. 7 ruling by a federal district judge in Texas is upheld on appeal. Heather Charles/Chicago Tribune/Tribune News Service via Getty Images hide caption

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Heather Charles/Chicago Tribune/Tribune News Service via Getty Images

Even though the sisters hope a successful drug treatment for their family's form of dementia will emerge, they're now planning for a future without one. "There's a kind of sorrow about Alzheimer's disease that, as strange as it seems, there's a comfort in being in the presence of people who understand it," Ward says. Juan Diego Reyes for NPR hide caption

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Juan Diego Reyes for NPR

With early Alzheimer's in the family, these sisters decided to test for the gene

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After a hospital stay, many patients are surveyed to weigh in on how good their experience was. Survey results can affect how much hospitals get paid. But instances of racial or other discrimination are not covered in the surveys. David Sacks/Getty Images hide caption

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David Sacks/Getty Images

Vials of the reformulated Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 booster move through production at a plant in Kalamazoo, Mich. Pfizer Inc. hide caption

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Pfizer Inc.

CDC recommends new booster shots to fight omicron

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Vials of the newly reformulated COVID-19 vaccine booster are being readied by Pfizer for distribution now that the Food and Drug Administration has authorized the shots for people 12 and older. Pfizer Inc. hide caption

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Pfizer Inc.

This computer-generated image shows the formation of a zygote after fertilization. Some Republican-led states, including Arkansas, Kentucky, Missouri, and Oklahoma, have passed laws declaring that life begins at fertilization, a contention that opens the door to a host of pregnancy-related litigation. Anatomical Travelogue/Science Source hide caption

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Anatomical Travelogue/Science Source

Physician Assistant Susan Eng-Na, right, administers a monkeypox vaccine during a vaccination clinic in New York. New cases are starting to decline in New York and some other U.S. cities. Mary Altaffer/AP hide caption

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Mary Altaffer/AP

The monkeypox outbreak may be slowing in the U.S., but health officials urge caution

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This carefully-worded and designed infographic from Rockland County, NY describes — in English, Spanish, Haitian Creole, and Yiddish — what polio is and that immunization is the best way to protect yourself and others. Ari Daniel for NPR hide caption

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Ari Daniel for NPR

New York counties gear up to fight a polio outbreak among the unvaccinated

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The new booster shot would be an update to Pfizer's current version of the shot, which was designed for the original strain of the coronavirus. Nam Y. Huh/AP hide caption

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Nam Y. Huh/AP

Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, listens as then-President Donald Trump answers questions in the press briefing room with members of the White House Coronavirus Task Force. Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images hide caption

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Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images

The federal government wants to roll out another round of COVID-19 boosters this fall but drugmakers are still testing the new boosters. The Food and Drug Administration has said it will base its evaluation of the boosters on data from mouse studies, in a controversial move. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

What's behind the FDA's controversial strategy for evaluating new COVID boosters

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Rural communities with struggling hospitals often turn to outside investors willing to take over their health care centers. Some are willing to sell the hospitals for next to nothing to companies that promise to keep them running. MEGAN JELINGER/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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MEGAN JELINGER/AFP via Getty Images

Abortion-rights advocates are using social media to reach young people who have more questions than ever about how to get an abortion. Leah Willingham/AP hide caption

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Leah Willingham/AP