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Medical Treatments

Hospitals in Idaho, like St. Luke's Boise Medical Center in Boise, remain full after the summer delta surge pushed many to their limits. Kyle Green/AP hide caption

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Kyle Green/AP

With hospitals crowded from COVID, 1 in 5 American families delays health care

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Janet Gerber, a health department worker in Louisville, Ky., processes boxes containing vials of the Johnson & Johnson COVID vaccine in March. Jon Cherry/Getty Images hide caption

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Jon Cherry/Getty Images

A study by the National Institutes of Health this week suggests people who got the J&J vaccine as their initial vaccination against the coronavirus may get their best protection from choosing an mRNA vaccine as the booster. Francine Orr/Los Angeles Times/Getty Images hide caption

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Francine Orr/Los Angeles Times/Getty Images

A study of COVID vaccine boosters suggests Moderna or Pfizer works best

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Gloria Clemons gives a COVID-19 vaccine to Navy veteran Perry Johnson at the Edward Hines, Jr. VA Hospital in Hines, Ill., in September. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Breakthrough infections might not be a big transmission risk. Here's the evidence

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Surgeons remove the liver and kidneys of a deceased donor, for later transplantation. Owen Franken/Getty Images hide caption

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Owen Franken/Getty Images

In the quest for a liver transplant, patients are segregated by prior alcohol use

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Registered nurse Christie Lindog works at the cardiovascular intensive care unit at Providence Cedars-Sinai Tarzana Medical Center in Tarzana, Calif., on Sept. 2. Apu Gomes/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Apu Gomes/AFP via Getty Images

Hospitals brace for an onslaught this winter, from flu as well as COVID

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Evidence seized from a drug trafficking operation in central California in early 2020 included methamphetamine and fentanyl with a street value of $1.5 million, authorities said. Tulare County Sheriff's Office via AP hide caption

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Tulare County Sheriff's Office via AP

Scientists at the Allen Institute for Brain Science uncovered differences among human brain cells (left) those of the marmoset monkey (middle) and mouse in a brain region that controls movement, the primary motor cortex. Allen Institute for Brain Science hide caption

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Allen Institute for Brain Science

New brain maps could help the search for Alzheimer's treatments

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A person receives the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine at a clinic at St. Patrick's Catholic Church in Los Angeles in April. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Judging 'sincerely held' religious belief is tricky for employers mandating vaccines

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Studies show burnout ran rampant in health care prior to the pandemic. Now it's a full-blown crisis. PeopleImages/Getty Images hide caption

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PeopleImages/Getty Images

The Toll Of Burnout On Medical Workers — And Their Patients

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At the San Francisco AIDS Foundation, staff members Tyrone Clifford (left) and Rick Andrews (right) demonstrate how a contingency management visit typically begins, with a participant picking up a specimen cup for a urine sample. If the sample tests negative for meth or cocaine use, the participant has an incentive dollar amount added to their "bank" which can later be traded for a gift card. Christopher Artalejo-Price/San Francisco AIDS Foundation hide caption

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Christopher Artalejo-Price/San Francisco AIDS Foundation

To Combat Meth, California Will Try A Bold Treatment: Pay Drug Users To Stop Using

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Travis Warner of Dallas got tested for the coronavirus at a free-standing emergency room in June 2020 after one of his colleagues tested positive for the virus. The emergency room bill included a $54,000 charge for one test. Laura Buckman for KHN hide caption

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Laura Buckman for KHN

The Bill For His COVID Test In Texas Was A Whopping $54,000

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Carlene Knight, who has a congenital eye disorder, volunteered to let doctors edit the genes in her retina using CRISPR. Franny White/OHSU hide caption

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Franny White/OHSU

A Gene-Editing Experiment Let These Patients With Vision Loss See Color Again

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The COVID-19 vaccine from Johnson & Johnson was a one-shot regime. But data shows that people who got the shot may have waning immunity, and some doctors say a second shot would be a good idea. Stephen Zenner/Getty Images hide caption

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Stephen Zenner/Getty Images

Engineer Marian Croak (left) and ophthalmologist Patricia Bath are the first Black women to be inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame in its nearly 50-year history. National Inventors Hall of Fame hide caption

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National Inventors Hall of Fame

A CDC advisory panel has recommended a third Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine dose for those who are 65 or older or run a high risk of severe disease. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Matt Rourke/AP

Julian Hernandez (right), 12, a seventh-grader at Hillside School in Illinois, says he feels much safer being back in school knowing that a weekly testing program is identifying those who are sick with COVID-19. Christine Herman/WILL hide caption

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Christine Herman/WILL

How Some Schools Are Using Weekly Testing To Keep Kids In Class — And COVID Out

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