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Medical Treatments

Fecal transplantation is an experimental procedure to treat intestinal conditions, including recurrent, antibiotic-resistant Clostridium difficile infection. But if the donor stool is not properly screened, it can spread other illnesses. SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY/Science Source hide caption

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SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY/Science Source

Drug agents last fall worked with a Minneapolis police SWAT team to seize just under 171 pounds of methamphetamine. Many U.S. states say they face an escalating problem with meth and drugs other than opioids. Cannon River Drug and Violent Task Force/AP hide caption

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Cannon River Drug and Violent Task Force/AP

Federal Grants Restricted To Fighting Opioids Miss The Mark, States Say

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'Patients Will Die': One County's Challenge To Trump's 'Conscience Rights' Rule

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In 2012, the Food and Drug Administration approved the use of Truvada to prevent HIV infection in people at high risk. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Expert Panel Recommends Wider Use Of Daily Pill To Prevent HIV Infections

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An MRI scan of a person listening to music shows brain areas that respond. (This scan wasn't part of the research comparing humans and monkeys.) KUL BHATIA/Kul Bhatia/Science Source hide caption

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KUL BHATIA/Kul Bhatia/Science Source

A Musical Brain May Help Us Understand Language And Appreciate Tchaikovsky

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Insys Therapeutics founder John Kapoor departs federal court in Boston, Jan. 30. On Monday the company filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy, saying it needs to sell its assets to pay back creditors. Kapoor, who was convicted last month of racketeering, owns more than 63% of the company. Steven Senne/AP hide caption

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Steven Senne/AP

Jeannine sorts through a binder of writing assignments from her therapy. In keeping a journal about her past experiences with pain, she noticed that the pain symptoms began when she was around 8 — a time of escalating family trauma at home. Jessica Pons for NPR hide caption

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Jessica Pons for NPR

Can You Reshape Your Brain's Response To Pain?

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Thor Ringler (right) interviewed Ray Miller (left) in Miller's hospital room at the William S. Middleton Memorial Veterans Hospital in Madison, Wis., in April. Miller's daughter Barbara (center) brought in photos and a press clipping from Miller's time in the National Guard to help facilitate the conversation. Bram Sable-Smith for NPR hide caption

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Bram Sable-Smith for NPR

Storytelling Helps Hospital Staff Discover The Person Within The Patient

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The best help for patients struggling with addiction, eating disorders or other mental health problems sometimes includes intensive therapy, the evidence shows. But many patients still have trouble getting their health insurers to cover needed mental health treatment. Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Some scientists oppose a prohibition on trying to use genetically modified embryos to create babies. Mark Schiefelbein/AP hide caption

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Mark Schiefelbein/AP

House Committee Votes To Continue Ban On Genetically Modified Babies

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Cannabidiol, or CBD, is a compound that can be extracted from marijuana or from hemp. It doesn't get people high because it doesn't contain THC, the psychoactive component of the cannabis plant. Getty Images hide caption

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Getty Images

A nurse displays vials of measles vaccine at the Orange County Health Department in May. Health officials said Thursday that new U.S. measles cases for 2019 so far have broken a 25-year-old record. Paul Hennessy/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Paul Hennessy/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Jake Powell, who works in New York City, is originally from Wyoming. Powell joined the PrEP4All movement after having to go off the drug for six months because it was too costly, even for someone with health insurance. Courtesy of Brandon Cuicchi hide caption

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Courtesy of Brandon Cuicchi

AIDS Activists Take Aim At Gilead To Lower Price Of HIV Drug PrEP

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At least 43 million Americans have overdue medical bills on their credit reports, according to a 2014 report on medical debt by the federal Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. Hero Images/Getty Images/Hero Images hide caption

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Hero Images/Getty Images/Hero Images

A file photo shows the campus of Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass. Dr. Anthony Rostain, co-author of The Stressed Years of Their Lives, says today's college students are experiencing an "inordinate amount of anxiety." Lisa Poole/AP hide caption

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Lisa Poole/AP

College Students (And Their Parents) Face A Campus Mental Health 'Epidemic'

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Charges for nitrous oxide during labor and delivery haven't been standardized. Courtesy of Kara Jo Prestrud, Birth Made Beautiful hide caption

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Courtesy of Kara Jo Prestrud, Birth Made Beautiful

Bill Of The Month: $4,836 Charge For Laughing Gas During Childbirth Is No Joke

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Avastin got an accelerated Food and Drug Administration approval for treatment of glioblastoma, but additional research found the drug didn't extend patients' lives. J.B. Reed /Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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J.B. Reed /Bloomberg via Getty Images

Cancer Drugs Approved Quickly Often Fail To Measure Up Later

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Zolgensma, a new drug approved by the FDA Friday, costs more than $2.1 million. It's made by AveXis, a drugmaker owned by pharmaceutical giant Novartis. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

At $2.1 Million, New Gene Therapy Is The Most Expensive Drug Ever

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