Medical Treatments Medical Treatments

The Food and Drug Administration approves more than 99 percent of applications for compassionate use of experimental medicines. But supporters of a right-to-try law want a more direct approach. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Andrew Harnik/AP

DNA isolated from a small sample of saliva or blood can yield information, fairly inexpensively, about a person's relative risk of developing dozens of diseases or medical conditions. GIPhotoStock/Cultura RF/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
GIPhotoStock/Cultura RF/Getty Images

Undocumented immigrants often can't get routine dialysis care and have to wait until their condition worsens to get emergency care. Jake Harper/Side Effects Public Media hide caption

toggle caption
Jake Harper/Side Effects Public Media

Doctors Without Borders staff enter an Ebola security zone at the entrance of the Wangata Reference Hospital in Mbandaka, in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Junior Kannah/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Junior Kannah/AFP/Getty Images

An X-ray of Sherry Young's foot shows the four implanted screws — each of which cost more than a high-end computer. Courtesy of Sherry Young hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Sherry Young

Planned Parenthood's affiliated clinics, like this one in Chicago, provide wellness exams and comprehensive contraceptive services, as well as screenings for cancer and sexually transmitted diseases for both women and men. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Scott Olson/Getty Images

Aimovig, a new kind of migraine drug, is injected once a month. The medicine reduced the number of migraines in clinical studies reviewed by the Food and Drug Administration. Amgen/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Amgen/AP

Marines based in Okinawa, Japan, fire an M136 AT-4 rocket launcher as part of a weapons training exercise on the Kaneohe Bay Range Training Facility, in 2014. Lance Cpl. Matthew Bragg/U.S. Marines/DVIDS hide caption

toggle caption
Lance Cpl. Matthew Bragg/U.S. Marines/DVIDS

Army 'Leans In' To Protect A Shooter's Brain From Blast Injury

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/611700850/612082817" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Herceptin has proved to be effective in prolonging the lives of the 12 percent of women with breast cancer whose malignancy hasn't spread to other organs, and whose cancer is HER2-positive. But side effects can be a problem. Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images

From left to right: Felito Diaz, Julio Cesar Santiago, Richard Lopez and Irma Bermudez meet at Casa Esperanza, a treatment and transitional housing program in Roxbury, Mass. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

toggle caption
Jesse Costa/WBUR

What Explains The Rising Overdose Rate Among Latinos?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/609814648/613254371" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Not seeing clearly can hamper a child's academic achievement, social development and long-term health, research shows. The right pair of glasses can make a big difference. FatCamera/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
FatCamera/Getty Images

Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar talked Friday about the administration's plans to lower drug prices as President Trump looked on in the White House Rose Garden. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Eleven days after surgery on her shoulder and foot, Sherry Young of Lawton, Okla., got a letter from her insurance plan saying that it hadn't approved her hospital stay. The letter "put me in a panic," says Young. The $115,000-plus bill for the hospital stay was about how much Young's home is worth, and five times her annual income. Nick Oxford for Kaiser Health News hide caption

toggle caption
Nick Oxford for Kaiser Health News

Sticker Shock Jolts Oklahoma Patient: $15,076 For 4 Tiny Screws

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/610072486/610905365" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In a speech Friday, President Trump announced a plan that lists dozens of "potential" steps his team may take to lower drug prices, along with many others that were included in his budget proposal and will require congressional action. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Trump Drug Pricing 'Blueprint' Could Take Years To Build

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/610418310/610529530" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Dr. Paul Marik (left) discusses patient care with medical students and resident physicians during morning rounds at Sentara Norfolk General Hospital in 2014 in Norfolk, Va. Jay Westcott for The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jay Westcott for The Washington Post/Getty Images

Can A Cocktail Of Vitamins And Steroids Cure A Major Killer In Hospitals?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/609149556/610337678" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Marnobia Juarez came to the U.S. from Guatemala and lives in Maryland. She dreams of getting her green card, but increasingly worries that won't happen under Trump's policy. Juarez was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2014 and receives care through a state health program. Paula Andalo/Kaiser Health News hide caption

toggle caption
Paula Andalo/Kaiser Health News