Medical Treatments Medical Treatments

Rita Steyn has a family history of cancer so she ordered a home genetic testing kit to see if she carried certain genetic mutations that increase the risk for the disease. Courtesy of Rita Steyn hide caption

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Courtesy of Rita Steyn

Results Of At-Home Genetic Tests For Health Can Be Hard To Interpret

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A serving of salmon contains about 600 IUs of vitamin D, researchers say, and a cup of fortified milk around 100. Cereals and juices are sometimes fortified, too. Check the labels, researchers say, and aim for 600 IUs daily, or 800 if you're older than 70. Dorling Kindersley/Getty Images/Dorling Kindersley hide caption

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Dorling Kindersley/Getty Images/Dorling Kindersley

Does Vitamin D Really Protect Against Colorectal Cancer?

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Americans are increasingly taking multiple drugs. And depression is a potential side effect of many of them. Glasshouse Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Glasshouse Images/Getty Images

1 In 3 Adults In The U.S. Takes Medications Linked To Depression

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Staff members hold an informal meeting before opening the STD free clinic in February in Portland, Maine. The CDC recorded more than 2 million cases of chlamydia, gonorrhea and syphilis nationally in 2016 — the highest number of reported cases yet, officials say. Derek Davis/Portland Press Herald/Press Herald via Getty Images hide caption

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Derek Davis/Portland Press Herald/Press Herald via Getty Images

If you're at low risk for heart disease, an electrocardiogram shouldn't be a routine test for you, a panel of medical experts says. Bruno Boissonnet/Science Source hide caption

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Bruno Boissonnet/Science Source

Charlie Wood of Charlottesville, Va., plays with bubbles during a May 4, 2017, rally near the Capitol to oppose proposed changes to the Affordable Care Act. Charlie was born a few months prematurely, and her mother, Rebecca (left), fears changes to the health law will negatively affect her care. Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call Inc. hide caption

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Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call Inc.

Julien Lavandier, a Colorado State University student, started smoking e-cigarettes as a high school sophomore. He says he's now hooked on Juul and has been unable to quit. John Daley / CPR News hide caption

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John Daley / CPR News
Marina Muun for NPR

Her Son Is One Of The Few Children To Have 3 Parents' DNA

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A scientist from the Nadiya Clinic in Kiev, Ukraine inserts a needle into a fertilized egg to extract the DNA of a man and woman trying to have a baby. The clinic is combining the DNA from three different people to create babies for women who are infertile. Rob Stein/NPR hide caption

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Rob Stein/NPR

Clinic Claims Success In Making Babies With 3 Parents' DNA

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A genetic test could spare many women with a common form of breast cancer from receiving chemotherapy. SPL/Science Source hide caption

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SPL/Science Source

Doctors Scrutinize Overtreatment, As Cancer Death Rates Decline

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"I'm one of the lucky ones," says Judy Perkins, of the immunotherapy treatment she got. The experimental approach seems to have eradicated her metastatic breast cancer." Courtesy of Judy Perkins hide caption

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Courtesy of Judy Perkins

Therapy Made From Patient's Immune System Shows Promise For Advanced Breast Cancer

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Maria Fabrizio for NPR

From Chaos To Calm: A Life Changed By Ketamine

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Dawn Charlton, an instructor with Being Adept, leads a discussion on marijuana for sixth-graders at Del Mar Middle School in Tiburon, California. Carrie Feibel/KQED hide caption

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Carrie Feibel/KQED

With The Rise Of Legal Weed, Drug Education Moves From 'Don't' to 'Delay'

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A sample of saliva can unlock details about a person's genetic makeup. Andrew Brookes/Cultura RF/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Brookes/Cultura RF/Getty Images

POLL: Genealogical Curiosity Is A Top Reason For DNA Tests; Privacy A Concern

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Surgeons at Johns Hopkins perform a transplant using an HIV-positive organ. Courtesy of Johns Hopkins Medical hide caption

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Courtesy of Johns Hopkins Medical
Katherine Streeter for NPR

When Scientists Develop Products From Personal Medical Data, Who Gets To Profit?

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A team at Johns Hopkins Medicine in Baltimore is developing a tumor-detecting algorithm for detecting pancreatic cancer. But first, they have to train computers to distinguish between organs. Courtesy of The Felix Project hide caption

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Courtesy of The Felix Project

For Some Hard-To-Find Tumors, Doctors See Promise In Artificial Intelligence

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