Medical Treatments Medical Treatments

Bea and Doug Duncan outside their home in Natick, Mass. The coaching they got from the Community Reinforcement and Family Training program, they say, gave them tools to help their son Jeff stick to his recovery from drug use. He's 28 now and has been sober for nine years. Robin Lubbbock/WBUR hide caption

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Robin Lubbbock/WBUR

Inducing labor at 39 weeks may involve IV medications and continuous fetal monitoring. But if the pregnancy is otherwise uncomplicated, mother and baby can do just fine, the latest evidence suggests. Loic Venance/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Loic Venance/AFP/Getty Images

Pregnancy Debate Revisited: To Induce Labor, Or Not?

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The results of genetic testing — whether done for health reasons or ancestry searches — can be used by insurance underwriters in evaluating an application for life insurance, or a disability or long-term-care policy. Science Photo Library RF/Getty Images hide caption

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Science Photo Library RF/Getty Images

Evelyn Nussembaum and her son Sam Vogelstein pick up a six month supply of Epidiolex from the experimental pharmacy at UCSF. Lesley McClurg/KQED hide caption

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Lesley McClurg/KQED

How One Boy's Fight With Epilepsy Led To The First Marijuana-Derived Pharmaceutical

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Good hospice care at the end of life can be a godsend to patients and their families, all agree, whether the care comes at home, or at an inpatient facility like this AIDS hospice. Still, oversight of the industry is important, federal investigators say. Bromberger Hoover Photography/Getty Images hide caption

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Bromberger Hoover Photography/Getty Images

HHS Inspector General's Report Finds Flaws And Fraud In U.S. Hospice Care

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Brenda J. Faulkner, co-founder of The Truman Foundation, sits with her dog Truman at the Association of Service Dog Providers for Military Veterans annual conference in Tyson's Corner, Va. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Wren Vetens was promised a significant discount on the cost of her gender-confirmation surgery if she paid in cash upfront, without using her health insurance. Yet afterward, Vetens received an explanation of benefits saying the hospital had billed her insurer nearly $92,000. Lauren Justice for KHN hide caption

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Lauren Justice for KHN

Bill Of The Month: A Plan For Affordable Gender-Confirmation Surgery Goes Awry

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Sarah Gonzales for NPR

Marines Who Fired Rocket Launchers Now Worry About Their Brains

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Training on how to spot human trafficking is given not only to doctors and nurses but also to registration and reception staff, social workers and security guards. A-Digit/Getty Images hide caption

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Having more than one child is associated with a lower risk of Alzheimer's, research finds, as is starting menstruation earlier in life than average and menopause later. Ronnie Kaufman/Blend Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Ronnie Kaufman/Blend Images/Getty Images

Hormone Levels Likely Influence A Woman's Risk Of Alzheimer's, But How?

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Describing how pain affects your daily activities may be more effective than the standard pain scale. Lynn Scurfield for NPR hide caption

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Lynn Scurfield for NPR

Words Matter When Talking About Pain With Your Doctor

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Jose and Elaine Belardo's lives were upended last year when he was diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer's disease. Alex Smith/KCUR hide caption

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Alex Smith/KCUR

How Soon Is Soon Enough To Learn You Have Alzheimer's?

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Scientists are in the early stages of developing new tests that could predict accurately if a woman is at risk of delivering her baby early. Steve Debenport/Getty Images hide caption

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Steve Debenport/Getty Images

A pharmacy technician prepares syringes containing an injectable anesthetic in the sterile medicines area of the inpatient pharmacy at the University of Utah Hospital in Salt Lake City. Rick Bowmer/AP hide caption

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Rick Bowmer/AP

Doctors Raise Alarm About Shortages Of Pain Medications

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Paul Blow for NPR

Investigation: Patients' Drug Options Under Medicaid Heavily Influenced By Drugmakers

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UCLA researchers are using a radioactive tracer, which binds to abnormal proteins in the brain, to see if it is possible to diagnose chronic traumatic encephalopathy in living patients. Warmer colors in these PET scans indicate higher concentrations of the tracer. UCLA hide caption

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UCLA

Some critically ill patients who received a CAR-T cell treatment have remained cancer-free for as long as five years, researchers say. But the price is high. Fanatic Studio/Collection Mix: Subjects RF/Getty Images hide caption

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Fanatic Studio/Collection Mix: Subjects RF/Getty Images

When the heart pushes too hard, as it does when blood pressure is elevated, it can cause damage that can lead to a stroke, says Dr. Walter Koroshetz. John Rensten/Getty Images hide caption

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John Rensten/Getty Images

Worried About Dementia? You Might Want to Check Your Blood Pressure

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