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Medical Treatments

While coronavirus vaccine trials are ongoing and a U.S. vaccine has yet to be approved, state health officials are planning ahead for how to eventually immunize a large swath of the population. Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images

Facing Many Unknowns, States Rush To Plan Distribution Of COVID-19 Vaccines

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Tobacco plants are being used in the development of COVID-19 vaccines. One is already being tested in humans. Rehman Asad/Barcroft Media via Getty Images hide caption

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Rehman Asad/Barcroft Media via Getty Images

Tobacco Plants Contribute Key Ingredient For COVID-19 Vaccine

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A decontamination crew from the Environmental Protection Agency works on extracting asbestos fibers from a barn in the Libby area. The EPA has cleaned thousands of homes, buildings, and public spaces in the most expensive environmental clean up in American history. Andrew Lichtenstein/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Lichtenstein/Corbis via Getty Images

COVID-19 Stalks A Montana Town Already Grappling With Asbestos Disease

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A volunteer received an injection as part of a clinical trial for a COVID-19 vaccine at Research Centers of America in Hollywood, Fla. Studies of vaccines backed by Operation Warp Speed have enrolled tens of thousands of people in a matter of months. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Grey reef sharks, seen in Fiji, are among the top species of sharks fished for their liver oil. Reinhard Dirscherl/Ullstein Bild via Getty Images hide caption

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Reinhard Dirscherl/Ullstein Bild via Getty Images

A Coronavirus Vaccine Could Kill Half A Million Sharks, Conservationists Warn

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A Marine is posted Thursday outside the West Wing of the White House, signifying the president is in the Oval Office. President Trump's physician said that he could return to public engagements as soon as Saturday. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Operation Warp Speed's Moncef Slaoui, seen here at the White House in May, says clinical trials of experimental COVID-19 vaccines will soon reveal if they work. Meanwhile, manufacture of the vaccines is picking up speed. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

President Trump's team of medical specialists overseeing his care at Walter Reed National Military Medical center. He will still have access to round-the-clock care from the White House medical staff. Brendan Smialowski /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski /AFP via Getty Images

A volunteer in a clinical trial for an experimental COVID-19 vaccine receives an injection last month at Research Centers of America in Hollywood, Fla. Eva Marie Uzcategui/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Eva Marie Uzcategui/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Is that sneezing or coughing fit a sign of allergies, a cold, the flu or COVID-19? If you also have a fever — a temperature above 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit or higher — those symptoms probably signal infection and not just allergies acting up. (Wait 30 minutes after eating or drinking to get an accurate measurement.) sestovic/Getty Images hide caption

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sestovic/Getty Images

A new wave of rapid coronavirus tests has entered the market with the potential to greatly expand screening for the virus. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Can The U.S. Use Its Growing Supply Of Rapid Tests To Stop The Virus?

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President Trump announced the creation of Operation Warp Speed in May to fast-track a coronavirus vaccine. He called it "a massive scientific and industrial, logistic endeavor unlike anything our country has seen since the Manhattan Project." Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

How Operation Warp Speed's Big Vaccine Contracts Could Stay Secret

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Each mobile clinic has a nurse, a counselor and a peer specialist — all trained to drive a 34-foot-long motor home. "I never thought when I went to nursing school that I'd be doing this," says Christi Couron as she pumps 52 gallons of diesel fuel into the vehicle. Markian Hawryluk/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Markian Hawryluk/Kaiser Health News

Three potential coronavirus vaccines are kept in a tray at Novavax labs in Gaithersburg, Md., in March 2020. The company has moved into phase 3 trials in the U.K. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

Novavax Researcher Says No Chance Of A 'Shortcut' In Vaccine Safety

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Matthew Fentress was diagnosed with heart disease that developed after a bout of the flu in 2014. His condition worsened three years later, and he had to declare bankruptcy when he couldn't afford his medical bills, despite having insurance. Meg Vogel for KHN hide caption

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Meg Vogel for KHN

Heart Disease Bankrupted Him Once. Now He Faces Another $10,000 Medical Bill

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A pregnant woman waits in line for groceries at a food pantry in Waltham, Mass., during the coronavirus pandemic. Charles Krupa/AP hide caption

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Charles Krupa/AP

Data Begin To Provide Some Answers On Pregnancy And The Pandemic

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Hospitals may soon be at risk of losing a critical funding stream — Medicare funding — if they don't comply with new COVID-19 data reporting requirements. John Lamparski/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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John Lamparski/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Trump Administration Plans Crackdown On Hospitals Failing To Report COVID-19 Data

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Researchers in Miami hold syringes containing either a placebo or the candidate COVID-19 vaccine from Moderna. Their work is part of a phase three clinical trial sponsored by the National Institutes of Health. Taimy Alvarez/AP hide caption

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Taimy Alvarez/AP