Medical Treatments Medical Treatments

Some critically ill patients who received a CAR-T cell treatment have remained cancer-free for as long as five years, researchers say. But the price is high. Fanatic Studio/Collection Mix: Subjects RF/Getty Images hide caption

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Fanatic Studio/Collection Mix: Subjects RF/Getty Images

When the heart pushes too hard, as it does when blood pressure is elevated, it can cause damage that can lead to a stroke, says Dr. Walter Koroshetz. John Rensten/Getty Images hide caption

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John Rensten/Getty Images

Worried About Dementia? You Might Want to Check Your Blood Pressure

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A homeless man in Denver draws heroin into a syringe. Treatment centers in the city say patterns of drug use seem to be changing. While most users once relied on a single drug — typically painkillers or heroin or cocaine — an increasing number now also use meth. Andy Cross/Denver Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Andy Cross/Denver Post via Getty Images

A Surge In Meth Use In Colorado Complicates Opioid Recovery

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A new study finds certain drugs that can boost the immune system show promise for developing anti-aging treatments in the future. David Pereiras / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm hide caption

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David Pereiras / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm

Experimental Drugs Boost Elderly Immune Systems, Raising Hopes For Anti-Aging Effects

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The Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act still prohibits your insurer from using the results of genetic tests against you. But the ACA's additional protections may be in doubt if certain states get their way. Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images

"Our health care systems need to adjust a little to try to get knowledge about cancer prevention to everybody," says Dr. Otis Brawley, chief medical and scientific officer of the American Cancer Society. American Cancer Society hide caption

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American Cancer Society

Juan Lopez Aguilar (left), a Maya man who fled violence in Guatemala three years ago, tells Dr. Nick Nelson he fears returning to the land of his birth. "There are a lot of gangs," he tells the doctor. "They want to kill people in my community." Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

Medical Clinics That Treat Refugees Help Determine The Case For Asylum

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Lipitor, a best-seller as a cholesterol treatment, is being tested as a remedy for the flu. Mel Evans/AP hide caption

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Mel Evans/AP

Scientists Find New Tricks For Old Drugs

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When ticks come into contact with clothing sprayed with permethrin, research shows, they quickly become incapacitated and are unable to bite. Pearl Mak/NPR hide caption

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Pearl Mak/NPR

To Repel Ticks, Try Spraying Your Clothes With A Pesticide That Mimics Mums

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Alan Dambach developed tremors that caused his hands to shake uncontrollably. His condition made it difficult to work on his family's tree farm in Fombell, Pa. Ross Mantle for NPR hide caption

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Ross Mantle for NPR

How Highly Focused Sound Waves Steadied A Farmer's Trembling Hand

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Shannon Hubbard has complex regional pain syndrome and considers herself lucky that her doctor hasn't cut back her pain prescription dosage. Will Stone/KJZZ hide caption

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Will Stone/KJZZ

Patients With Chronic Pain Feel Caught In An Opioid Prescribing Debate

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During his life, Charles Dickens (1812-1870) was known not only for his novels, but for his scientific research and public health advocacy. Herbert Watson/Charles Dickens Museum hide caption

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Herbert Watson/Charles Dickens Museum

Minneapolis Investigates Police Use Of Ketamine On Suspects

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Gilead Sciences makes Truvada, a medicine known generically as "pre-exposure prophylaxis," or PrEP. Consistent, daily doses of the drug are thought to reduce the risk of getting HIV from sex by more than 90 percent. Paul Sakuma/AP hide caption

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Paul Sakuma/AP

Nailah Winkfield (left) and Omari Sealey, the mother and uncle of Jahi McMath, listen to doctors speak during a news conference in San Francisco in 2014. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

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Eric Risberg/AP