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Medical Treatments

With new infections rising around the country due to the delta variant, reports of breakthrough cases among the fully vaccinated can be worrisome. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Technology consultant Frank Thai creates a 3-D scan of a preserved cadaver in the medical school's Anatomy Resource Center. Kaiser Permanente Bernard J. Tyson School of Medicine hide caption

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Kaiser Permanente Bernard J. Tyson School of Medicine

U.S. Surgeon General Dr. Vivek Murthy, who has helped the U.S. through other crises like the Zika outbreak, is now taking on health misinformation around COVID-19, which he says continues to jeopardize the country's efforts to beat back the virus. John Raoux/AP hide caption

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John Raoux/AP

The U.S. Surgeon General Is Calling COVID-19 Misinformation An 'Urgent Threat'

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UCSF neurosurgeon Edward Chang says a system that lets a man express his thoughts at 15 words a minute is just the beginning for computer-mediated communication. Barbara Ries/UCSF hide caption

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Barbara Ries/UCSF

Experimental Brain Implant Lets Man With Paralysis Turn His Thoughts Into Words

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Jameson Rybak, son of Jim and Suzanne Rybak of Florence, S.C., struggled with opioid addiction and died of an overdose on June 9, 2020 — three months after he left a hospital ER because he feared he couldn't afford treatment. Gavin McIntyre/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Gavin McIntyre/Kaiser Health News

A human "Pink Ribbon" chain is made to raise breast cancer screening awareness in New York City. Taylor Hill/Getty Images hide caption

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Taylor Hill/Getty Images

The Ripple Effects Of A Huge Drop In Cancer Screenings

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Health conditions exacerbated by obesity include heart disease, stroke, Type 2 diabetes and certain types of cancer, according to the CDC. Researchers say the newly approved drug Wegovy could help many who struggle with obesity lose weight. adamkaz/Getty Images hide caption

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adamkaz/Getty Images

Obesity Drug's Promise Now Hinges On Insurance Coverage

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Kathleen McAuliffe, a home care worker for Catholic Charities in a Portland, Maine, suburb, helps client John Gardner with his weekly chores. McAuliffe shops for Gardner's groceries, cleans his home and runs errands for him during her weekly visit. Brianna Soukup/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Brianna Soukup/Kaiser Health News
Rose Wong for NPR/KHN

A Hospital Charged More Than $700 For Each Push Of Medicine Through Her IV

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Patrick Doherty volunteered for a new medical intervention of gene-editor infusions for the treatment of genetically-based diseases. Patrick Doherty hide caption

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Patrick Doherty

He Inherited A Devastating Disease. A CRISPR Gene-Editing Breakthrough Stopped It

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A doctor reviews a PET brain scan at Banner Alzheimer's Institute in Phoenix. The drug company Biogen Inc. says it will seek federal approval for a medicine to treat early Alzheimer's disease. The announcement was a surprise because the company stopped two studies of aducanumab in 2019 after partial results suggested it was not working. Matt York/AP hide caption

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Matt York/AP

FDA Approves Aducanumab — A Controversial Drug For Alzheimer's

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After experiencing a suicidal crisis earlier this year, Melinda, a Massachusetts 13-year-old, was forced to remain 17 days in the local hospital's emergency room while she waited for a space to open up at a psychiatric treatment facility. She was only allowed to use her phone an hour a day in the ER; her mom visited daily, bringing books and special foods. Photo courtesy of Pam, Melinda's mother hide caption

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Photo courtesy of Pam, Melinda's mother

Kids In Mental Health Crisis Can Languish For Days Inside ERs

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Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, warned on Tuesday of the danger from the Delta variant of the coronavirus. Among those not yet vaccinated, Delta may trigger serious illness in more people than other variants do. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Fauci Warns Dangerous Delta Variant Is The Greatest Threat To U.S. COVID Efforts

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A teen gets a dose of Pfizer's COVID-19 vaccine last month at Holtz Children's Hospital in Miami. Nearly 7 million U.S. teens and preteens (ages 12 through 17) have received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine so far, the CDC says. Eva Marie Uzcategui/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Eva Marie Uzcategui/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Kayla Northam's weight topped 300 pounds as a teenager. She'd started to develop diabetes, and liver and joint problems before seeking bariatric surgery about a decade ago at age 18. Kayla Northam hide caption

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Kayla Northam

Bariatric Surgery Works, But Isn't Offered To Most Teens Who Have Severe Obesity

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Portrait of Phillip Lyn taken by his spouse, Kurt Rehwinkel, outside their home in St. Louis. Kurt Rehwinkel hide caption

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Kurt Rehwinkel

For Those Facing Alzheimer's, A Controversial Drug Offers Hope

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Giving people with organ transplants a third dose of the mRNA vaccines for COVID-19 appears to boost their immunity, according to a new study. Joseph Prezioso /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Joseph Prezioso /AFP via Getty Images

The infectious and contagious rabies virus, shown here in a colorized micrograph, can be transmitted to humans through the bite or saliva of an infected animal. Thanks to protective vaccination of pets, rabies was eliminated from the U.S. dog population in 2007, though a bite from infected bats, skunks and raccoons can still transmit the virus. Biophoto Associates/Science Source hide caption

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Biophoto Associates/Science Source

The U.S. Bans Importing Dogs From 113 Countries After Rise In False Rabies Records

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Novavax says its vaccine is 100% effective against the original strain of the coronavirus and had 93% efficacy against more worrisome variants. Alastair Grant/AP hide caption

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Alastair Grant/AP

Novavax Says Its COVID Vaccine Is Extremely Effective

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