Medical Treatments Medical Treatments

Patients awaiting epilepsy surgery agreed to keep a running log of their mood while researchers used tiny wires to monitor electrical activity in their brains. The combination revealed a circuit for sadness. Stuart Kinlough/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Stuart Kinlough/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Researchers Uncover A Circuit For Sadness In The Human Brain

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A change in hospital culture can help prevent serious complications and death during delivery, according to clinicians who work in the field. Ian Hoot/Science Photo Library/Getty Images hide caption

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Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, testifying before a House subcommittee in May. There are "very tight restrictions" being placed on the distribution and use of Dsuvia, Gottlieb said Friday in addressing the FDA's approval of the new opioid. But critics of the FDA decision say the drug is unnecessary. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Catherine Guthrie decided not to get breast reconstruction after her double mastectomy in 2009. Not Putting on a Shirt is a grassroots advocacy organization that brings attention to the issue of surgeons disregarding breast cancer patients' wishes to go flat. Courtesy of Catherine Guthrie hide caption

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Courtesy of Catherine Guthrie

Cancer of the cervix is one of the most common cancers affecting women and can be fatal. Here, cervical cancer cells are dividing, as seen through a colored scanning electron micrograph. Steve Gschmeissner/Getty Images/Science Photo Library hide caption

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Steve Gschmeissner/Getty Images/Science Photo Library

For Cervical Cancer Patients, Less Invasive Surgery Is Worse For Survival

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Getting people of different ethnicities and cultural backgrounds into clinical trials is not only a question of equity, doctors say. It's also a scientific imperative to make sure candidate drugs work and are safe in a broad cross-section of people. Richard Bailey/Getty Images hide caption

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Richard Bailey/Getty Images

Evelyn Marie Vukadinovich is swabbed with a gauze pad immediately after being born by cesarean section at Inova Women's Hospital in Falls Church, Va. Mary Mathis/NPR hide caption

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Mary Mathis/NPR

Doctors Test Bacterial Smear After Cesarean Sections To Bolster Babies' Microbiomes

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A Philadelphia police officer holds a package of the overdose antidote naloxone while on patrol in the Kensington neighborhood of Philadelphia in April 2017. Dominick Reuter/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Dominick Reuter/AFP/Getty Images

Opioid Antidote Can Save Lives, But Deciding When To Use It Can Be Challenging

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Janet Winston stands in her rose garden in Eureka, Calif. Testing revealed she is allergic to numerous substances, including linalool. Winston still can handle roses, which contain linalool, but she can't wear perfumes and cosmetic products that contain the compound. Alexandra Hootnick hide caption

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Alexandra Hootnick

Bill Of The Month: A $48,329 Allergy Test Is A Lot Of Scratch

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Connor Webb and his mother, Kim Webb, stand outside of their home in Huntington Beach, Calif. Connor was treated for a rare cancer at 16. He's well now but his mother is fighting for new cures in case the cancer comes back. Alex Welsh for NPR hide caption

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Alex Welsh for NPR

The cerebellum, a brain structure humans share with fish and lizards, appears to control the quality of many functions in the brain, according to a team of researchers. Science Source hide caption

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Science Source

The Underestimated Cerebellum Gains New Respect From Brain Scientists

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Paramedic Larrecsa Cox (center) and her quick-response team, including police Officer Stephanie Coffey (left) and Pastor Virgil Johnson (right), check in at the home in Huntington, W.Va., of someone who was revived a few days before from an overdose. Sarah McCammon/NPR hide caption

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Sarah McCammon/NPR

Knocking On Doors To Get Opioid Overdose Survivors Into Treatment

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A major study published Monday finds that widely prescribed antipsychotic drugs like haloperidol are no more effective than a placebo for treating delirium. Nehru Sulejmanovski/Getty Images hide caption

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Nehru Sulejmanovski/Getty Images

Antipsychotic Drugs Don't Ease ICU Delirium

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When you get hearing aids, it can help you stay more stimulated and socially engaged. Fancy/Veer/Corbis/Getty Images hide caption

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Fancy/Veer/Corbis/Getty Images

Want To Keep Your Brain Sharp? Take Care Of Your Eyes And Ears

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When one of Jose Nuñez's retinas was damaged by diabetes in 2016, the Los Angeles truck driver expected his Medicaid managed care policy to coordinate treatment. But Centene, the private insurer that manages his policy, gave him the runaround, he says, and he lost sight in that eye. Heidi de Marco/KHN hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/KHN

Black men are twice as likely as whites to die from prostate cancer, one of the deadliest cancers that affect males. Tetra Images/Getty Images/Tetra images RF hide caption

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Tetra Images/Getty Images/Tetra images RF

"We have only begun to scratch the surface of the complex problems inherent in figuring out ... the brain's inner workings," said Paul Allen in 2012. Kum Kulish/Corbis/Getty Images hide caption

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Kum Kulish/Corbis/Getty Images

President Trump listens in January as Stephen Ubl, president and CEO of Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (second from left), introduces himself during a meeting at the White House. The sky-high prices of some drugs are a big issue for some voters this fall. Pool/Ron Sachs/Getty Images hide caption

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Pool/Ron Sachs/Getty Images

Should TV Drug Ads Be Forced To Include A Price? Trump's Team Says Yes

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According to the law in most states, health care providers own patients' medical records. But federal privacy law governs how that information can be used. And whether or not you can profit from your own medical data is murky. alicemoi/Getty Images/RooM RF hide caption

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alicemoi/Getty Images/RooM RF

If Your Medical Information Becomes A Moneymaker, Could You Get A Cut?

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