Medical Treatments Medical Treatments

Medical Treatments

Dr. Randall Bly, an assistant professor of otolaryngology-head and neck surgery at the University of Washington School of Medicine who practices at Seattle Children's Hospital, uses the experimental smartphone app and a paper funnel to check his daughter's ear. Dennis Wise/University of Washington hide caption

toggle caption
Dennis Wise/University of Washington

Many people might not be aware of what types of vaccines they need as they get older. Here, an adult gets a flu shot in Jacksonville, Fla. Rick Wilson/AP images for Flu + You hide caption

toggle caption
Rick Wilson/AP images for Flu + You

Signs advertising free measles vaccines and providing information about measles are displayed at the Rockland County Health Department in Pomona, N.Y. The county in New York City's northern suburbs has had more than 200 measles cases since last fall. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Seth Wenig/AP

In most states, undocumented immigrants with kidney failure have to receive dialysis as an emergency treatment in hospital emergency rooms. Some advocates say kidney transplants for undocumented immigrants would be a cheaper way to treat the problem. JazzIRT/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
JazzIRT/Getty Images

Transplants A Cheaper, Better Option For Undocumented Immigrants With Kidney Failure

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/721800514/722647788" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

An FDA inspection of this Ranbaxy facility in Toansa, Punjab, India, in 2014, revealed drug quality testing violations, resulting in the FDA prohibiting Ranbaxy from marketing drugs in the U.S. that were manufactured at this plant. Dhiraj Singh/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Dhiraj Singh/Getty Images

Copperhead snakes are one of the four kinds of venomous snakes in the United States. kristianbell/RooM RF/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
kristianbell/RooM RF/Getty Images

How You (And Your Dog) Can Avoid Snake Bites — And What To Do If You Get Bitten

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/721934569/722739408" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Just as sleep deprivation has been shown to impair cognition, so too has it been found to dampen empathy for others. Johner Images/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Johner Images/Getty Images

An MRI scan shows signs of atrophy in the brain of a patient with Huntington's disease. Science Photo Library/Science Source hide caption

toggle caption
Science Photo Library/Science Source

Experimental Drug For Huntington's Disease Jams Malfunctioning Gene

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/721788348/721829037" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The director of the Denver campaign told NPR that the results from the vote shows that society's perception of psychedelics has changed. Photofusion/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Photofusion/UIG via Getty Images

Buprenorphine, better known by the brand name Suboxone, helps people with opioid addiction stay in recovery. But it is prescribed far more often to white drug users than to blacks. Craig F. Walker/Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Craig F. Walker/Boston Globe via Getty Images

Opioid Addiction Drug Going Mostly To Whites, Even As Black Death Rate Rises

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/721447601/721552561" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Isabelle Carnell-Holdaway (left), now 17, with her mother Joanne Carnell-Holdaway. Isabelle has a dangerous infection that is being treated with a cocktail of genetically modified viruses. Courtesy of Jo Holdaway hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Jo Holdaway

Genetically Modified Viruses Help Save A Patient With A 'Superbug' Infection

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/719650709/721552567" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A growing body of research suggests psychedelic mushrooms may have therapeutic benefits for certain conditions. Now a movement seeks to decriminalize them. farmer images/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
farmer images/Getty Images

A Growing Push To Loosen Laws Around Psilocybin, Treat Mushrooms As Medicine

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/720828367/720999429" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Lenh Vuong, a clinical social worker at Los Angeles County+USC Medical Center, checks on a former John Doe patient she recently helped identify. Heidi de Marco/KHN hide caption

toggle caption
Heidi de Marco/KHN

Hundreds of people rally in March at the Oregon State Capitol in Salem, protesting a proposal to tighten school vaccine requirements Similar rallies were held in April. Sarah Zimmerman/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Sarah Zimmerman/AP

Amid Measles Outbreaks, States Consider Revoking Religious Vaccine Exemptions

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/720673193/720800756" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Dr. Brian Chesebro (right), in Portland, Ore., has calculated that by simply using the anesthesia gas sevoflurane in most surgeries, instead of the similar gas desflurane, he can significantly cut the amount of global warming each procedure contributes to the environment. Kristian Foden-Vencil/OPB hide caption

toggle caption
Kristian Foden-Vencil/OPB

Effects Of Surgery On A Warming Planet: Can Anesthesia Go Green?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/716415598/720800732" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Even if a genetic test could reliably predict obesity risk, would people make effective use of the information? eyecrave/Vetta/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
eyecrave/Vetta/Getty Images

How Helpful Would A Genetic Test For Obesity Risk Be?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/719558715/720570721" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Many jails and prisons won't give prisoners buprenorphine, a drug which controls heroin and opioid cravings, known also by the brand name Suboxone. Elise Amendola/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Elise Amendola/AP

The Freewinds, a cruise ship owned by the Church of Scientology, is seen docked in quarantine in Castries, St. Lucia, on Thursday. The ship is now headed to the island of Curaçao, site of its home port. Kirk Elliott/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Kirk Elliott/AFP/Getty Images

Phil Gutis with his dog, Abe, who died last year. Gutis, who has Alzheimer's, hoped an experimental drug could help preserve his memories. Courtesy of Timothy Weaver hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Timothy Weaver

After A Big Failure, Scientists And Patients Hunt For A New Type Of Alzheimer's Drug

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/718754791/720097412" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Clarisa Corber at work at a Topeka, Kan., insurance agency. Corber and her husband — who have three kids, a health plan and $15,000 in medical debt — were profiled in a recent Los Angeles Times investigation into the effects of high-deductible health plans. Nick Krug/Los Angeles Times hide caption

toggle caption
Nick Krug/Los Angeles Times

Employees Start To Feel The Squeeze Of High-Deductible Health Plans

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/719519579/719897252" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

As scientists learn more about the complex way genes combine and work together to create human traits, the idea of "designer babies" becomes less and less likely. BlackJack3D/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
BlackJack3D/Getty Images

Why Making A 'Designer Baby' Would Be Easier Said Than Done

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/719665841/719737209" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript