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Medical Treatments

Babies of moms who are in the ICU with severe flu have a greater chance of being born premature and underweight. Nenov/Getty Images hide caption

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Severe Flu Raises Risk Of Birth Problems For Pregnant Women, Babies

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Dr. Lisa Hofler runs a University of New Mexico clinic that stocks mifepristone but doesn't routinely provide prenatal care. She and her colleagues can schedule same-day appointments for women diagnosed with miscarriages elsewhere. Adria Malcolm for NPR hide caption

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Adria Malcolm for NPR

While some new drugs entering the market are driving up prices for consumers, drug companies are also hiking prices on older drugs. Sigrid Olsson/PhotoAlto/Getty Images hide caption

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Sigrid Olsson/PhotoAlto/Getty Images

Hillary Frank is the creator of the podcast The Longest Shortest Time. Her new book is Weird Parenting Wins. Richard Frank/Penguin Random House hide caption

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Richard Frank/Penguin Random House

Childbirth Injury Led A New Mom To Start A Parenting Podcast 'To Feel Less Alone'

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A colorized image of a brain cell from an Alzheimer's patient shows a neurofibrillary tangle (red) inside the cytoplasm (yellow) of the cell. The tangles consist primarily of a protein called tau. SPL/Science Source hide caption

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SPL/Science Source

Alzheimer's Disease May Develop Differently In African-Americans, Study Suggests

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Loretta Boesing, of Park Hills, Mo., with her son Wesley, who underwent a liver transplant in 2012. Boesing worried the potency of her son's anti-rejection medicine could have been affected by the extremely hot weather when it was delivered. Alex Smith/KCUR hide caption

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Alex Smith/KCUR

Extreme Temperatures May Pose Risks To Some Mail-Order Meds

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Is It A Nasty Cold Or The Flu?

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Talitha Saunders and AJ Ikamoto tidy their ambulance at the end of a recent shift. The two work as emergency medical responders in Oregon with American Medical Response in Portland. Leaders there are working to prevent any race-based disparities in treatment. Kristian Foden-Vencil/Oregon Public Broadcasting hide caption

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Kristian Foden-Vencil/Oregon Public Broadcasting

Emergency Medical Responders Confront Racial Bias

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Toni Hoy, at her home in Rantoul, Ill., holds a childhood photo of her son, Daniel, who is now 24. In a last-ditch effort to get Daniel treatment for his severe mental illness in 2007, the Hoys surrendered parental custody to the state. "When I think of him, that's the picture I see in my mind. Just this adorable, blue-eyed, blond little sweetie," Hoy says. Christine Herman/Illinois Public Media hide caption

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Christine Herman/Illinois Public Media

To Get Mental Health Help For A Child, Desperate Parents Relinquish Custody

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Abortion-rights advocates rally outside the Iowa capitol building in May. A law there banning abortion after a fetal heartbeat is detected is one of several state laws on its way through the courts. Barbara Rodriguez/AP hide caption

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Barbara Rodriguez/AP

Activists Brace For 2019 Abortion-Rights Battles In The States

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Though his politics are right of center and he lobbied hard against the Affordable Care Act, Republican Sen. Orrin Hatch also has been key to passing several landmark health laws with bipartisan support. Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Getty Images

How Sen. Orrin Hatch Shaped America's Health Care In Controversial Ways

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Even for conventional medical treatments that are covered under most health insurance policies, the large copays and high deductibles have left many Americans with big bills, says a health economist, who sees the rise in medical fundraisers as worrisome. Roy Scott/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Roy Scott/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Patients Are Turning To GoFundMe To Fill Health Insurance Gaps

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Terry Mote (right) visits the home of Stanley and Lorit Jamor in Enid, Okla. Stanley was born on Bikini atoll, and is a descendant of Chief Juda, who was told in 1946 by Commodore Ben H. Wyatt, of the U.S. Navy, to give up the island homeland "for the good of all mankind." Bikini was a main site for U.S. nuclear testing and is uninhabitable to this day because of radioactive contamination. Sarah Craig for NPR hide caption

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Sarah Craig for NPR

A Policy Knot Leaves Oklahomans From Marshall Islands Struggling To Get Health Care

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Chris holds a plastic syringe he and his wife use to administer homemade medical marijuana oil to their 13-year-old son, Dylan, who has autism. Lynn Arditi/The Public's Radio hide caption

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Lynn Arditi/The Public's Radio

After Other Options Fail, A Family Tries Medical Marijuana For Son With Autism

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Sarah Witter had two operations to repair bones in her lower left leg after a skiing accident last February. The second surgery was needed to replace a stabilizing plate that broke. Matt Baldelli for KHN hide caption

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Matt Baldelli for KHN

Research inspired by soccer headers has led to fresh insights into how the brain weathers hits to the head. Photo illustration by David Madison/Getty Images hide caption

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Photo illustration by David Madison/Getty Images

Bad Vibes: How Hits To The Head Are Transferred To The Brain

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