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Cameron and Katlynn Fischer celebrated their April wedding in Colorado. But the day before, Cameron was in such bad shape from a bachelor party hangover that he headed to an emergency room to be rehydrated. That's when their financial headaches began. Courtesy of Cameron Fischer hide caption

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Courtesy of Cameron Fischer

A colored computerized tomography (CT) scan of an axial section of the brain of a 59-year-old patient with a malignant (cancerous) glioblastoma brain tumor. Science Photo Library/Science Source hide caption

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Science Photo Library/Science Source

Deadly Brain Cancers Act Like 'Vampires' By Hijacking Normal Cells To Grow

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Ric Peralta and his wife Lisa are both able to check Ric's blood sugar levels at any time, using the Dexcom app and an arm patch that measures the levels and sends the information wirelessly. Allison Zaucha for NPR hide caption

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Allison Zaucha for NPR

It's Not Just Insulin: Diabetes Patients Struggle To Get Crucial Supplies

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A group gathers at the state capitol in Austin, Texas, in May to protest abortion restrictions. In defiance of the state's ban on city funding of abortion providers, the Austin City Council has found a workaround to help women seeking the procedure. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

As Texas Cracks Down On Abortion, Austin Votes To Help Women Defray Costs

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Bridget Desmukes (center) and her husband, Jeffrey, love having a big, active family. "The kids are always climbing on things, flipping all the time — it's not dull," she says, laughing. Because Desmukes had developed preeclampsia in a previous pregnancy, her OB-GYN recommended low-dose aspirin at her first prenatal appointment this past spring. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

A Daily Baby Aspirin Could Help Many Pregnancies And Save Lives

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Visitors and park rangers at historic Fort Scott check out a medevac helicopter operated by Midwest AeroCare during the Kansas town's Good Ol' Days festival. Sarah Jane Tribble/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Sarah Jane Tribble/Kaiser Health News

Air Ambulances Woo Rural Consumers With Memberships That May Leave Them Hanging

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These human embryo-like structures (top) were synthesized from human stem cells; they've been stained to illustrate different cell types. Images (bottom) of the "embryoids" in the new device that was invented to make them. Yi Zheng/University of Michigan, Ann Arbor hide caption

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Yi Zheng/University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

Scientists Create A Device That Can Mass-Produce Human Embryoids

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Tracy Lee for NPR

How To Teach Future Doctors About Pain In The Midst Of The Opioid Crisis

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The EPA says it aims to eliminate the testing of chemicals and pesticides in animals by 2035. filo/Getty Images hide caption

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filo/Getty Images

EPA Chief Pledges To Severely Cut Back On Animal Testing Of Chemicals

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Supporters of safe injection sites in Philadelphia rallied outside this week's federal hearing. The judge's ultimate ruling will determine if the proposed "Safehouse" facility to prevent deaths from opioid overdose would violate the federal Controlled Substances Act. Kimberly Paynter/WHYY hide caption

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Kimberly Paynter/WHYY

Trump Administration Is In Court To Block Nation's 1st Supervised Injection Site

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Dr. Peter Grinspoon was a practicing physician when he became addicted to opioids. When he got caught, Grinspoon wasn't allowed access to what's now the standard treatment for addiction — buprenorphine or methadone (in addition to counseling) — precisely because he was a doctor. /Tony Luong for NPR hide caption

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/Tony Luong for NPR

For Health Workers Struggling With Addiction, Why Are Treatment Options Limited?

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UK Biobank has granted 10,000 qualified scientists access to its large database of genetic sequences and other medical data, but other organizations with databases have been far more restrictive in giving access. KTSDESIGN/Getty Images/Science Photo Library hide caption

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KTSDESIGN/Getty Images/Science Photo Library

How Should Scientists' Access To Health Databanks Be Managed?

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The New York State Department of Health said Thursday that it is looking at vitamin E acetate as a potential cause of severe pulmonary illness cases in the state that have been associated with vaping. Daniel Becerril/Reuters hide caption

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Daniel Becerril/Reuters

Groupon and other deal sites are the latest marketing tactic in medicine, offering bargain prices for services such as CT scans. Colin Cuthbert/Science Photo Libra/Getty Images hide caption

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Colin Cuthbert/Science Photo Libra/Getty Images

Bags of heroin, some laced with fentanyl, picked up in a 2016 New York City drug bust. "Basically, [fentanyl] is so cheap to produce and it's so powerful, that drug dealers began realizing it was a way to increase their profits," Fentanyl, Inc. author Ben Westhoff says. But miscalculations of the amount used can be deadly. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Fentanyl As A Dark Web Profit Center, From Chinese Labs To U.S. Streets

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The measles virus is highly contagious. If someone with measles coughs or sneezes, the virus in those droplets can survive for two hours afterward — infecting about 90% of the people lacking immunity who pass through that space. Erik Witsoe/EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

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Erik Witsoe/EyeEm/Getty Images

Millennial And Gen-X Travelers: Need Another Measles Shot?

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UK Biobank, based in Manchester, England, is the largest blood-based research project in the world. The research project will involve at least 500,000 people across the U.K., and follow their health for next 30 years or more, providing a resource for scientists battling diseases. Christopher Furlong/Getty Images hide caption

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Christopher Furlong/Getty Images

UK Biobank Requires Earth's Geneticists To Cooperate, Not Compete

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Water utilities need quick ways to check for contamination in the drinking water supply, including from norovirus, which causes intestinal distress. Scientists are trying to make it easier to test for the virus. Rehan Hasan / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm hide caption

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Rehan Hasan / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm

A Speedy Test For Norovirus Could Help Water Supplies Check For Contamination

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Scientists say pea-size organoids of human brain tissue may offer a way to study the biological beginnings of a wide range of brain conditions, including autism, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. Alysson Muotri/UC San Diego Health Sciences hide caption

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Alysson Muotri/UC San Diego Health Sciences

After Months In A Dish, Lab-Grown Minibrains Start Making 'Brain Waves'

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Before scheduling his hernia surgery, Wolfgang Balzer called the hospital, the surgeon and the anesthesiologist to get estimates for how much the procedure would cost. But when his bill came, the estimates he had obtained were wildly off. John Woike for Kaiser Health News hide caption

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John Woike for Kaiser Health News

Bill Of The Month: Estimate For Cost Of Hernia Surgery Misses The Mark

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