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Medical Treatments

Dr. Danielle Ofri, author of When We Do Harm: A Doctor Confronts Medical Error, says medical mistakes are likely to increase as resource-strapped hospitals treat a rapid influx of COVID-19 patients. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

A Doctor Confronts Medical Errors — And Flaws In The System That Create Mistakes

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As Coronavirus Surges, How Much Testing Does Your State Need To Subdue The Virus?

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Gilead Sciences, maker of the antiviral drug remdesivir, has come up with a price for the COVID-19 treatment that was less than some analysts expected. ULRICH PERREY/POOL/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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ULRICH PERREY/POOL/AFP via Getty Images

Remdesivir Priced At More Than $3,100 For A Course Of Treatment

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Then-Director of the National Institutes of Health Elias Zerhouni speaks with President George W. Bush during a round table discussion on cancer prevention at the NIH in Bethesda, Md., in 2007. Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

Internationally, scientists now have on file the genomes of more than 47,000 different samples of the virus that causes COVID-19 — up from just one in January. Here's a transmission electron micrograph of SARS-CoV-2 virus particles (orange) isolated from a patient. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases/National Institutes of Health hide caption

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National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases/National Institutes of Health

This Coronavirus Doesn't Change Quickly, And That's Good News For Vaccine Makers

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Kai Koerber, a rising sophomore at the University of California, Berkeley, is a survivor of the 2018 mass shooting at Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla. Since then, he says, he's made promoting a mental health curriculum in high schools and colleges a personal priority. Brittany Hosea-Small hide caption

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Brittany Hosea-Small

'Bear Our Pain': The Plea For More Black Mental Health Workers

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Plastic fencing and landscaping boulders replaced homeless campsites on this block in downtown Denver. Advocates for the homeless fear that displacing encampments risks spreading the coronavirus throughout the homeless community. Jakob Rodgers/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Jakob Rodgers/Kaiser Health News

This image shows the buildup of toxic tau proteins in the medial temporal gyrus of a human brain. Though some drugs can now remove these proteins, that hasn't seemed to ease Alzheimer's symptoms. It's time to look more deeply into how the cells work, scientists say. UW Medicine hide caption

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UW Medicine

Alzheimer's Researchers Go Back To Basics To Find The Best Way Forward

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A laboratory technician holds a dose of a COVID-19 vaccine candidate ready for a trial in May 2020. Mladen Antonov/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mladen Antonov/AFP via Getty Images

Tyson tested every worker at about 20 of its plants, including this one in Logansport, Ind., after workers got sick. The company is now considering ongoing random testing to try to keep outbreaks from flaring. Darron Cummings/AP hide caption

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Darron Cummings/AP

How Widespread Coronavirus Testing Helped Meatpacking Plants Slow Outbreaks

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Dr. Julie Holland, author of the new book, Good Chemistry, says that when patients taking antidepressants have stopped experiencing relief, psychedelic drugs might be used in conjunction with talk therapy to help some work through past traumas. Milos Zivkovic/EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

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Milos Zivkovic/EyeEm/Getty Images

Psychiatrist Explores Possible Benefits Of Treating PTSD With Ecstasy Or Cannabis

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Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., holds a bottle of hydroxychloroquine while raising concerns about its use. Lev Radin/Pacific Press/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Ge hide caption

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Lev Radin/Pacific Press/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Ge

Dr. Nico Dosenbach decided to put his healthy arm in a cast to figure out more about how the brain deals with an immobilized limb. Tim Parker/Washington University School of Medicine hide caption

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Tim Parker/Washington University School of Medicine

A Scientist's Pink Cast Leads To Discovery About How The Brain Responds To Disability

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Cows with genes from the human immune system make antibodies that may help people fight the coronavirus. Walter Portz/SAB Biotherapeutics hide caption

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Walter Portz/SAB Biotherapeutics

Cows Help With COVID-19 Treatment, No Bull

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A COVID-19 patient is attached to a ventilator in April in the emergency room at St. Joseph's Medical Center in Yonkers, N.Y. A steroid treatment is showing promise in reducing mortality for patients on ventilators. John Minchillo/AP hide caption

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John Minchillo/AP

A bottle of hydroxychloroquine tablets in Texas City, Texas. The Food and Drug Administration has rescinded its emergency use authorization for the drug. David J. Phillip/AP hide caption

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David J. Phillip/AP

Costs have gone up for addiction treatment centers in recent months, as they have had to invest in teletherapy and personal protective gear. "We are at risk for not having the funding that we need to keep our doors open," says one medical director. Maskot/Getty Images hide caption

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Maskot/Getty Images

A New Addiction Crisis: Treatment Centers Face Financial Collapse

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Drivers line up for COVID-19 testing in the Sherman Oaks neighborhood of Los Angeles in May. Kevin Winter/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Winter/Getty Images

What Zebra Mussels Can Tell Us About Errors In Coronavirus Tests

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A volunteer received a shot of the experimental Moderna vaccine against COVID-19 in March as part of a safety study. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

Questions About How Crash Program Is Picking Coronavirus Vaccines To Back

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The lungs of a young woman in her 20s became so damaged by COVID-19 that she could not survive without her blood being oxygenated outside her body on an ECMO machine. She received a double-lung transplant on June 5. In this photo taken before the transplant, the patient is being monitored by the ECMO team at Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicago. Northwestern Medicine hide caption

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Northwestern Medicine

Kelly Womochil, an aide at Enterprise Estates Nursing Center in Enterprise, Kan., tries on a poncho that the Federal Emergency Management Agency is sending to nursing homes to protect against the coronavirus. Pamela Black hide caption

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Pamela Black

A researcher at the German Center for Immunity Therapy holds a bag containing blood plasma from a recovered COVID-19 patient at the University Hospital Erlangen on April 27, 2020 in Erlangen, Germany. This plasma could be used to treat people with COVID-19. Alexander Hassenstein/Getty Images hide caption

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Alexander Hassenstein/Getty Images

Five Coronavirus Treatments In Development

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