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Mark Forrest is back fishing after rehabilitation with the IpsiHand device helped him regain use of his right hand. Mark Forrest hide caption

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Mark Forrest

New Device Taps Brain Signals To Help Stroke Patients Regain Hand Function

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Dr. Aaron Kesselheim (left), a professor at Harvard Medical School, at a documentary film screening in 2018 in Boston. He has resigned from a Food and Drug Administration advisory panel over the FDA's decision to approve an Alzheimer's drug. Scott Eisen/AP Images for AIDS Healthcare Foundation hide caption

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Scott Eisen/AP Images for AIDS Healthcare Foundation
Alyson Hurt/NPR

States Scale Back Pandemic Reporting, Stirring Alarm

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A woman receives the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 at a drive-in vaccination event last week in Meerbusch, Germany. Lukas Schulze/Getty Images hide caption

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Lukas Schulze/Getty Images

New Evidence Suggests COVID-19 Vaccines Remain Effective Against Variants

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By the time Victoria Cooper enrolled in an alcohol treatment program in 2018, she was "drinking for survival," not pleasure, she says — multiple vodka shots in the morning, at lunchtime and beyond. In the treatment program, she saw other women in their 20s struggling with alcohol and other drugs. "It was the first time in a very long time that I had not felt alone," she says. Ferguson Menz/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Ferguson Menz/Kaiser Health News

Women Now Drink As Much As Men — Not So Much For Pleasure, But To Cope

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A vial of the experimental Novavax coronavirus vaccine is ready for use in a London study in 2020. Novavax's vaccine candidate contains a noninfectious bit of the virus — the spike protein — with a substance called an adjuvant added that helps the body generate a strong immune response. Alastair Grant/AP hide caption

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Alastair Grant/AP

A New Type Of COVID-19 Vaccine Could Debut Soon

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Dr. William Burke reviews a PET brain scan at Banner Alzheimer's Institute in Phoenix in 2018. An experimental Alzheimer's drug from Biogen and Eisai is on the verge of a Food and Drug Administration decision. Matt York/AP hide caption

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Matt York/AP

FDA Poised For Decision On Controversial Alzheimer's Drug

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From left: A New Delhi woman waits in an observation room after getting the Covishield vaccine (the name used for the AstraZeneca vaccine in India) on May 26. U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson leaves a vaccination center after his first AstraZeneca dose on March 19. On March 9, Nairobi, Kenya, began vaccinating groups, including health care workers and older people, with the AstraZeneca vaccine. From left: Prakash Singh, Aaron Chown, Robert Bonet/Getty Images hide caption

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From left: Prakash Singh, Aaron Chown, Robert Bonet/Getty Images

It's The Vaccine That's Lost A Lot Of Trust. But AstraZeneca Still Has Its Fans

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More than 30 states have medical marijuana programs — yet scientists are only allowed to use cannabis plants from one U.S. source for their research. That's set to change, as the federal government begins to add more growers to the mix. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Mark Prausnitz, Georgia Tech Regents' professor in the School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, holds a vaccine patch containing microneedles that dissolve into the skin. Christopher Moore/Georgia Tech hide caption

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Christopher Moore/Georgia Tech

A Vaccine Patch Could Someday Be An Ouchless Option

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The vaccines for COVID-19 are highly effective, but people can get infected in what appear to be extremely rare cases. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has decided only to investigate the cases that result in hospitalization or death. Image Point FR/NIH/NIAID/BSIP/Universal Images Group via Getty Images hide caption

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Image Point FR/NIH/NIAID/BSIP/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

CDC Move To Limit Investigations Into COVID Breakthrough Infections Sparks Concerns

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New guidance would ease restrictions on researching embryos in the lab. BSIP/Science Source hide caption

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BSIP/Science Source

Controversial New Guidelines Would Allow Experiments On More Mature Human Embryos

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Last year, in her first year of medical school at Harvard, Pooja Chandrashekar recruited 175 multilingual health profession students from around the U.S. to create simple and accurate fact sheets about COVID-19 in 40 languages. Michele Abercrombie for NPR hide caption

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Michele Abercrombie for NPR

Jennifer Minhas had been a nurse for years when she contracted COVID-19 in 2020. Since then, lingering symptoms — what's known as long-haul COVID-19 — made it impossible for her to work. For months, she and her doctors struggled to understand what was behind her fatigue and rapid heartbeat, among other symptoms. Tara Pixley for NPR hide caption

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Tara Pixley for NPR

An older person receives their first dose of the AstraZeneca vaccine in Thika, Kenya. The vaccine's manufacturer, Serum Institute of India, announced this week that it will freeze all exports of the vaccine through the end of this year — leaving 20 million people in Africa without a source for their second dose. Patrick Meinhardt/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick Meinhardt/Bloomberg via Getty Images

20 Million Africans Are Due For Their 2nd COVID Shot. But There's No Supply In Sight

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President Barack Obama bumped fists with Nathan Copeland during a tour of innovation projects at the White House Frontiers Conference at the University of Pittsburgh in 2016. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Scientists Bring The Sense Of Touch To A Robotic Arm

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The Pfizer-BioNTech Covid-19 vaccine can now be stored at regular refrigerator temperatures for up to a month. Micah Green/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Micah Green/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Rep. Mariannette Miller-Meeks, R-Iowa, listens as Robert Kramer, president and chief executive officer of Emergent BioSolutions, testifies during a Wednesday hearing of the House Select Subcommittee on the Coronavirus Crisis. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Pool/Getty Images

People line up for COVID-19 vaccinations last month in Hagerstown, Md. Each person vaccinated helps end the pandemic, epidemiologists say, and helps lower the rate of hospitalization and death from COVID-19. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

It's Time For America's Fixation On Herd Immunity To End, Scientists Say

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