UPDATE: The Latest 'NPR Policy On Use Of Potentially Offensive Language' : Memmos Standards & Practices Editor Mark Memmott writes occasional notes about the issues journalists encounter and the way NPR handles them. They often expand on topics covered in the Ethics Handbook.
NPR logo UPDATE: The Latest 'NPR Policy On Use Of Potentially Offensive Language'

UPDATE: The Latest 'NPR Policy On Use Of Potentially Offensive Language'

A search today for NPR's latest guidance on the use of potentially offensive language revealed that we hadn't posted the most recent version.

So, here's a link to where our latest language about such language can be found. It was written earlier this year:

The biggest change from the previous document is the addition of a lengthy section on "Entertainment and Music Programming."

Fair warning: As we might say on the air and online, "some of the language in the document will be offensive to many readers."

The section of the Ethics Handbook that deals with "using potentially offensive language" has been updated with the new link.

This is a good time for a reminder, because one slipped through the cracks on us last week: If there's potentially offensive language in a piece intended for broadcast — even if the words have been bleeped — stations need to be alerted in the DACS line. Listeners and readers online deserve to be warned as well, of course.

Clarification: No offensive words were heard in the piece referred to above. The words were bleeped.