If We've Bleeped It, Do We Also Need To Warn Listeners? Maybe Not : Memmos Standards & Practices Editor Mark Memmott writes occasional notes about the issues journalists encounter and the way NPR handles them. They often expand on topics covered in the Ethics Handbook.
NPR logo If We've Bleeped It, Do We Also Need To Warn Listeners? Maybe Not

If We've Bleeped It, Do We Also Need To Warn Listeners? Maybe Not

Is it necessary to alert listeners that there's offensive/disturbing/troubling/etc. language in a report if we've already bleeped the nettlesome word or words?

The short answer is, "not always."

Previous guidance has been too strict on this point. Let's try this:

If it's been decided after discussions with senior editors that a word or phrase will be bleeped, don't assume listeners do or do not need to be alerted. Instead, consider the context.

– Is the cut still intense, graphic or disturbing even after it's been bleeped? Then a heads up for listeners could be warranted. By the way, it may not have to be a line that sounds like a warning. The language can be conversational and informational (more on that below).

– Is the cut funny and a naughty word or two are said in jest? Then a heads up probably isn't necessary.

– Is it one bleep in an otherwise family-friendly piece and the word wasn't said in anger? Then, again, there could be no need for a heads up.

Basically, it's a judgment call. Talk to the deputy managing editors (Chuck Holmes & Gerry Holmes) and/or the standards & practices editor (Mark Memmott). It will get figured out.

Two related notes:

– Here's the part about being conversational and informational. If we think listeners should be alerted, we don't always need to say something like "we should warn you." On Morning Edition recently, there was a piece about the comic Chris Gethard. Two F-bombs were bleeped. In the introduction, David Greene said of Gethard that, "Chris is funny and weird. But he doesn't shock audiences. You'll only hear a couple of bleeps this morning." That told listeners something about Gethard and tipped them off to what was coming without saying they needed to be on guard.

– Any time there's bleeped language in a piece, the DACS line must tell stations what that word is, when it appears (or approximately if we're still editing) and that it will be bleeped. Obviously, on the occasions when we don't bleep offensive language, the DACS need to explain that.

NPR's "Policy On Use Of Potentially Offensive Language" is posted here.