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Some people get obsessed with romance and fantasy novels. What's the science behind this kind of guilty pleasure? proxyminder/Getty Images/E+ hide caption

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pleasure

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MDMA or ecstasy is under consideration for FDA approval for treating PTSD but it's future is uncertain. MirageC/Getty Images/Moment RF hide caption

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MirageC/Getty Images/Moment RF

Will MDMA's setback derail psychedelics research?

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A new study looks at the roles that African and European genetic ancestries can play in Black Americans' risk for some brain disorders. TEK Image/Science Photo Library/Getty Images hide caption

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TEK Image/Science Photo Library/Getty Images

African ancestry genes may be linked to Black Americans' risk for some brain disorders

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A dose of MDMA in the office of Dr. Michael Mithoefer, a psychiatrist who has studied the use of MDMA as a treatment for PTSD in Mount Pleasant, SC, USA, on August 24, 2017. The Washington Post/The Washington Post via Getty Im/The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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The Washington Post/The Washington Post via Getty Im/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Later this year, the FDA plans to decide whether MDMA can be used to treat PTSD Eva Almqvist/Getty Images hide caption

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Eva Almqvist/Getty Images

Farida Azizova-Such inside the nursery rocking her son to sleep. "He was 5 weeks when we started coming. It's just my husband and I taking care of him, so I was alone at home. I wanted to find new moms to connect with and a safe space to be able to come and learn about how to take care of a baby, and also my identity shifted when you become a mother." Ali Lapetina for NPR hide caption

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Ali Lapetina for NPR

Fentanyl-laced counterfeit oxycodone pills are flooding U.S. streets, but other street drugs, including methamphetamine and cocaine, are killing more and more people. U.S. Attorney's Office for Utah/AP hide caption

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U.S. Attorney's Office for Utah/AP

Edward Peter-Paul is chief of the Mi'kmaq Nation in Maine. Decades ago, a sweat ceremony helped him improve his relationship with drugs and alcohol. He hopes the new healing lodge can do the same for other tribal citizens. Aneri Pattani/KFF Health News hide caption

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Aneri Pattani/KFF Health News

A tribe in Maine is using opioid settlement funds on a sweat lodge to treat addiction

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The hope was that bringing many other services to people with high needs would stabilize their health problems. While the strategy has succeeded sometimes, it hasn't saved money. Douglas Sacha/Getty Images hide caption

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Douglas Sacha/Getty Images

Vargas Arango, 22, is a second-year student at Miami Dade College, studying business and psychology. Eva Marie Uzcategui for NPR hide caption

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Eva Marie Uzcategui for NPR

College student explores rare mental health condition in award-winning podcast

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Thousands of abortion rights protesters rallied in Tampa on Oct. 2, 2021. Stephanie Colombini/WUSF hide caption

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Stephanie Colombini/WUSF

Florida's 6-week abortion ban is now in effect, curbing access across the South

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Siblings may not be obvious fodder for the therapist's office, but experts say maybe they should be. "People just don't perceive those relationships as needing the type of attention and tending one might bring to a spouse or child," says Kelly Scott of Tribeca Therapy in New York. Lily Padula for NPR hide caption

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Lily Padula for NPR

All grown up, but still fighting? Why more siblings are turning to therapy, together

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Katie Krimitsos is among the majority of American women who have trouble getting healthy sleep, according to a new Gallup survey. Krimitsos launched a podcast called Sleep Meditation for Women to offer some help. Natalie Champa Jennings/Natalie Jennings, courtesy of Katie Krimitsos hide caption

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Natalie Champa Jennings/Natalie Jennings, courtesy of Katie Krimitsos

No matter how old you are, having a happy birthday is one of life's great pleasures, says Tamar Hurwitz-Fleming, author of How to Have a Happy Birthday. Click here to download this cake-shaped zine to print and fold at home — the back has helpful birthday tips. Zine by Malaka Gharib/NPR; Photo illustration by Becky Harlan/NPR hide caption

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Zine by Malaka Gharib/NPR; Photo illustration by Becky Harlan/NPR

This cake-shaped zine may help you have your happiest birthday yet

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A new study finds that front yards with friendly features, such as pink flamingos or porch furniture, are correlated with happier, more connected neighbors and a greater "sense of place." ROBERT SULLIVAN/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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ROBERT SULLIVAN/AFP via Getty Images

The author's 8-year-old daughter, Rosy, has a "kids' license," showing she has her parents' permission to ride her bike around her Texas hometown. Michaeleen Doucleff hide caption

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Michaeleen Doucleff

At left, Zion Kelly holds a photo of his late twin brother Zaire Kelly. At right, Zion keeps this framed photo of he and his brother on the desk in his bedroom. Dee Dwyer for NPR hide caption

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Dee Dwyer for NPR

A gunman stole his twin from him. This is what he's learned about grieving a sibling

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