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Mental Health

Lisa Abramson holds her firstborn child, Lucy, in 2014. A few weeks after Lucy's birth, Abramson began feeling confused and then started developing delusions — symptoms of postpartum psychosis. Courtesy of Claire Mulkey hide caption

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Courtesy of Claire Mulkey

She Wanted To Be The Perfect Mom, Then Landed In A Psychiatric Unit

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Belmont University's nursing program started hiring actors like Vickie James to help with their end-of-life simulations for students. Blake Farmer/WPLN hide caption

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Blake Farmer/WPLN

Morphine, And A Side Of Grief Counseling: Nursing Students Learn How To Handle Death

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Toni Hoy, at her home in Rantoul, Ill., holds a childhood photo of her son, Daniel, who is now 24. In a last-ditch effort to get Daniel treatment for his severe mental illness in 2007, the Hoys surrendered parental custody to the state. "When I think of him, that's the picture I see in my mind. Just this adorable, blue-eyed, blond little sweetie," Hoy says. Christine Herman/Illinois Public Media hide caption

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Christine Herman/Illinois Public Media

To Get Mental Health Help For A Child, Desperate Parents Relinquish Custody

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Researchers say human brains can become overwhelmed by cute traits, such as large eyes and small noses, embodied by movie characters like Bambi. Disney Junior/Disney Channel via Getty Images hide caption

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Disney Junior/Disney Channel via Getty Images

When Too Cute Is Too Much, The Brain Can Get Aggressive

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Chris holds a plastic syringe he and his wife use to administer homemade medical marijuana oil to their 13-year-old son, Dylan, who has autism. Lynn Arditi/The Public's Radio hide caption

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Lynn Arditi/The Public's Radio

After Other Options Fail, A Family Tries Medical Marijuana For Son With Autism

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Kristen Uroda for NPR

If You Feel Thankful, Write It Down. It's Good For Your Health

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Before light reaches these rods and cones in the retina, it passes through some specialized cells that send signals to brain areas that affect whether you feel happy or sad. Omikron /Getty Images/Science Source hide caption

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Omikron /Getty Images/Science Source

Scientists Find A Brain Circuit That Could Explain Seasonal Depression

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Philadelphia demonstrators protested earlier moves by Republicans to repeal the Affordable Care Act last February. If the ACA is indeed axed as unconstitutional, health policy analysts say, millions of people could lose health coverage, and many aspects of Medicare and Medicaid would change dramatically. Bastiaan Slabbers/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Bastiaan Slabbers/NurPhoto via Getty Images
Jasjyot Singh Hans for NPR

Teen Girls And Their Moms Get Candid About Phones And Social Media

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The 2016 viral photo of a couple passed out in a car while a child sits in the back seat triggered a painful moment of self-reflection in East Liverpool, Ohio. The community took steps to address its addiction problem, but progress has been spotty. Ian Brown for NPR hide caption

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Ian Brown for NPR

Isela was denied life insurance because her medication list showed a prescription for the opioid-reversal drug naloxone. The Boston Medical Center nurse says she wants to have the drug on hand so she can save others. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

Nurse Denied Life Insurance Because She Carries Naloxone

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A highly potent synthetic opioid, fentanyl is often mixed into other drugs sold on the street, including pills, heroin and even cocaine. Towfiqu Photography/Getty Images hide caption

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Towfiqu Photography/Getty Images

Keri Blakinger spent nearly two years incarcerated on narcotics charges before becoming a criminal justice reporter for the Houston Chronicle. Nicole Hensley/Houston Chronicle hide caption

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Nicole Hensley/Houston Chronicle

From Convict To Criminal Justice Reporter: 'I Was So Lucky To Come Out Of This'

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Located in Northern Wisconsin along the shores of Lake Superior, Ashland, Wis. has had enough of substance abuse issue. NorthLakes Community Clinic brought in Dr. Mark Lim to start a team providing substance abuse and mental health services. Derek Montgomery for NPR hide caption

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Derek Montgomery for NPR

For One Rural Community, Fighting Addiction Started With Recruiting The Right Doctor

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In several European countries and Canada, patients with longterm opioid addiction are prescribed pharmaceutical grade heroin which they inject in clinics like the Patrida Medical Clinic in Berlin. Some addiction specialists want to pilot similar programs in the U.S. picture alliance/picture alliance via Getty Image hide caption

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picture alliance/picture alliance via Getty Image

Childhood infections may increase the risk of developing certain mental illnesses in childhood and adolescence. Kathleen Finlay/Getty Images/Image Source hide caption

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Kathleen Finlay/Getty Images/Image Source

Offering therapy to children in need at school makes sense, says Sarah Nadeau, who adopted two girls from a family that struggled with addiction, because sometimes school is the only stable place they have. Getty Images hide caption

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Getty Images

Kristen Philman first tried methamphetamine in her early 20s, as an alternative to heroin and other opioids. When she discovered she was pregnant, she says, it was a wake-up call, and she did what she needed to do to stop using all those drugs. Theo Stroomer for NPR hide caption

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Theo Stroomer for NPR

Another Drug Crisis: Methamphetamine Use By Pregnant Women

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