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Beech trees seen from the forest floor. This image was taken in a forest named Bøkeskogen in Larvik city, Norway. Baac3nes/Getty Images hide caption

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Liz Kirkaldie says her grandson's marijuana use led to his schizophrenia diagnosis. She says she's skeptical the labels will work, "But if it helps even one person? Great." Beth LaBerge/KQED hide caption

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Beth LaBerge/KQED

California may require labels on pot products to warn of mental health risks

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US Forces in Afghanistan work with a German Shepherd to inspect a vehicle for explosives. IEDs and other bombs led to brain injuries in service people but appear so far to not increase their risk of CTE. ROMEO GACAD / AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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ROMEO GACAD / AFP via Getty Images

CTE is rare in brains of deceased service members, study finds

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Becky Harlan/NPR

6 tips to help you overcome your fear of flying

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Linnea Sorensen attends Schaumburg High School in Schaumburg, Ill. Now that Illinois allows students to take up to five days off per school year for their mental health, she can stay home when she feels "not fully mentally there." Giles Bruce/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Giles Bruce/Kaiser Health News

A memorial dedicated to the victims of the mass shooting at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

What the shooting in Uvalde has meant for the Latino community

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People sit Feb. 14 in front of a photo display of the 17 people killed four years earlier during a mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

A teacher who was at the Parkland shooting offers advice for the Uvalde survivors

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Henry Jones, who kept getting sicker after 11 years of homelessness, was admitted in 1991 into Christ House, one of the first medical respite programs in the country. Ryan Levi/Tradeoffs hide caption

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Ryan Levi/Tradeoffs
Joe Anderson for NPR

3 people with a serious mental illness share their journeys through the pandemic

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Kim Ryu for NPR

4 elements to create "home:" discussing mental health in the Asian American community

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A man uses a safe injection site in New York City in January. A bill in California would allow pilot sites in San Francisco, Oakland and Los Angeles. Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images
Photos by Simon Haven/Getty and Correia Patrice/Getty; Collage by Becky Harlan/NPR

With Roe v. Wade primed to be overruled, people seeking abortions could soon face new barriers in many states. Researcher Diana Greene Foster documented what happens when someone is denied an abortion in The Turnaway Study. Malte Mueller/Getty Images hide caption

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Malte Mueller/Getty Images

A landmark study tracks the lasting effect of having an abortion — or being denied one

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Signs on a temporary fence around the U.S. Supreme Court building on May 05, 2022 in Washington, DC. Anna Moneymaker / Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Moneymaker / Getty Images

The Turnaway Study: What The Research Says About Abortion

A leaked draft opinion in the Supreme Court case Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization has placed uncertainty on the future of abortion rights in the United States. As written, the opinion would overturn Roe v. Wade protections. We at Short Wave were immediately curious about the data behind abortions: What happens when pregnant people are denied abortions?

The Turnaway Study: What The Research Says About Abortion

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An undated photo provided by the Larimer County Sheriff's Office of Austin Hopp in Fort Collins, Colo. Larimer County Sheriff's Office via AP hide caption

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Larimer County Sheriff's Office via AP

Protesters rally at the Texas State Capitol on May 4, 2021 in Austin to stop proposed medical care ban legislation that would criminalize gender-affirming care. Erich Schlegel/AP Images for Human Rights Campaign hide caption

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Erich Schlegel/AP Images for Human Rights Campaign

Rachel Levine, U.S. assistant secretary for health, says, "The language of medicine and science is being used to drive people to suicide." Political attacks against trans young people are on the rise across the country. Caroline Brehman-Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Caroline Brehman-Pool/Getty Images

Rachel Levine calls state anti-LGBTQ bills disturbing and dangerous to trans youth

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Liz Fosslien