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Drug agents last fall worked with a Minneapolis police SWAT team to seize just under 171 pounds of methamphetamine. Many U.S. states say they face an escalating problem with meth and drugs other than opioids. Cannon River Drug and Violent Task Force/AP hide caption

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Cannon River Drug and Violent Task Force/AP

Federal Grants Restricted To Fighting Opioids Miss The Mark, States Say

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Kim Ryu for NPR

Rural Health: Financial Insecurity Plagues Many Who Live With Disability

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Jeannine sorts through a binder of writing assignments from her therapy. In keeping a journal about her past experiences with pain, she noticed that the pain symptoms began when she was around 8 — a time of escalating family trauma at home. Jessica Pons for NPR hide caption

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Jessica Pons for NPR

Can You Reshape Your Brain's Response To Pain?

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Thor Ringler (right) interviewed Ray Miller (left) in Miller's hospital room at the William S. Middleton Memorial Veterans Hospital in Madison, Wis., in April. Miller's daughter Barbara (center) brought in photos and a press clipping from Miller's time in the National Guard to help facilitate the conversation. Bram Sable-Smith for NPR hide caption

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Bram Sable-Smith for NPR

Storytelling Helps Hospital Staff Discover The Person Within The Patient

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The best help for patients struggling with addiction, eating disorders or other mental health problems sometimes includes intensive therapy, the evidence shows. But many patients still have trouble getting their health insurers to cover needed mental health treatment. Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images

A California two-spot octopus extends a sucker-lined arm from its den. In 2015, this was the first octopus species to have its full genetic sequence published. Courtesy of Michael LaBarbera hide caption

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Courtesy of Michael LaBarbera

Why Octopuses Might Be The Next Lab Rats

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Cannabidiol, or CBD, is a compound that can be extracted from marijuana or from hemp. It doesn't get people high because it doesn't contain THC, the psychoactive component of the cannabis plant. Getty Images hide caption

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Getty Images

Participation in team sports as a teen may help protect against the long-term mental health effects of childhood trauma. Hero Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Hero Images/Getty Images
Chris Nickels for NPR

This Teen Planned A School Shooting. But Did He Break The Law?

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A file photo shows the campus of Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass. Dr. Anthony Rostain, co-author of The Stressed Years of Their Lives, says today's college students are experiencing an "inordinate amount of anxiety." Lisa Poole/AP hide caption

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Lisa Poole/AP

College Students (And Their Parents) Face A Campus Mental Health 'Epidemic'

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Volunteers help pay for and disseminate overdose kits, including the overdose antidote, naloxone, in Summit County, Ohio. The costs of battling the addiction crisis are a burden on many local municipalities. Brian Mann for NPR hide caption

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Brian Mann for NPR

Cities And States Look To Big Pharma To Cover Costs Of The Opioid Epidemic

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Chris Nickels for NPR

How The Brain Shapes Pain And Links Ouch With Emotion

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Buprenorphine, better known by the brand name Suboxone, helps people with opioid addiction stay in recovery. But it is prescribed far more often to white drug users than to blacks. Craig F. Walker/Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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Craig F. Walker/Boston Globe via Getty Images

Opioid Addiction Drug Going Mostly To Whites, Even As Black Death Rate Rises

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A growing body of research suggests psychedelic mushrooms may have therapeutic benefits for certain conditions. Now a movement seeks to decriminalize them. farmer images/Getty Images hide caption

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farmer images/Getty Images

A Growing Push To Loosen Laws Around Psilocybin, Treat Mushrooms As Medicine

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Cornelia Li for NPR

From Gloom To Gratitude: 8 Skills To Cultivate Joy

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Phil Gutis with his dog, Abe, who died last year. Gutis, who has Alzheimer's, hoped an experimental drug could help preserve his memories. Courtesy of Timothy Weaver hide caption

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Courtesy of Timothy Weaver

After A Big Failure, Scientists And Patients Hunt For A New Type Of Alzheimer's Drug

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Psychiatry's shift toward seeing mental health problems as an illness to be treated with a pill hasn't always served patients well, says Harvard historian and author Anne Harrington. James Wardell/Radius Images/Getty Images hide caption

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James Wardell/Radius Images/Getty Images

How Drug Companies Helped Shape A Shifting, Biological View Of Mental Illness

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Kim has been living at the Epiphany Center, a treatment facility in San Francisco for women struggling with addiction, for the past six months. She says her teddy bear is her only material possession left from her past: "Because everything I had, I've lost over and over again." April Dembosky/KQED hide caption

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April Dembosky/KQED

As Meth Use Surges, First Responders Struggle To Help Those In Crisis

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