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Helping a spouse or parent who has dementia steer clear of hazards can include ridding the home of all guns. Nicole Xu for NPR hide caption

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Nicole Xu for NPR

Firearms And Dementia: How Do You Convince A Loved One To Give Up Their Guns?

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Nicole and Ben Veum, with their little boy, Adrian. Nicole was in recovery from opioid addiction when she gave birth to Adrian, and she worried the fentanyl in her epidural would lead to relapse, but it didn't. Adam Grossberg/KQED hide caption

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Adam Grossberg/KQED

Childbirth In The Age Of Addiction: New Mom Worries About Maintaining Her Sobriety

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Mourners comfort each other Thursday during a vigil at the Thousand Oaks Civic Arts Plaza for the victims of the mass shooting at Borderline Bar and Grill in Thousand Oaks, Calif. Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images

Another Mass Shooting? 'Compassion Fatigue' Is A Natural Reaction

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Join us for a webcast on life and health in rural America. From The Forum at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Courtesy of Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health hide caption

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Courtesy of Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

Sister Bertha Lopez Chaves applies anti-inflammatory eyedrops to a migrant at a stadium in Mexico City where the caravan is resting. Her order is one of roughly 50 groups giving aid to the migrants in the Mexican capital. "We're just trying to deal with their basic needs so they can continue on," she says. James Fredrick for NPR hide caption

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James Fredrick for NPR

Patients awaiting epilepsy surgery agreed to keep a running log of their mood while researchers used tiny wires to monitor electrical activity in their brains. The combination revealed a circuit for sadness. Stuart Kinlough/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Stuart Kinlough/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Researchers Uncover A Circuit For Sadness In The Human Brain

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Tetris and other absorbing brain games can get you into a "flow" state that relieves stress. Mary Mathis/NPR hide caption

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Mary Mathis/NPR

Can't Stop Worrying? Try Tetris To Ease Your Mind

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Katherine Streeter for NPR

We Just 'Fell Back' An Hour. Here Are Tips To Stay Healthy During Dark Days Ahead

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Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, testifying before a House subcommittee in May. There are "very tight restrictions" being placed on the distribution and use of Dsuvia, Gottlieb said Friday in addressing the FDA's approval of the new opioid. But critics of the FDA decision say the drug is unnecessary. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Getting people of different ethnicities and cultural backgrounds into clinical trials is not only a question of equity, doctors say. It's also a scientific imperative to make sure candidate drugs work and are safe in a broad cross-section of people. Richard Bailey/Getty Images hide caption

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Richard Bailey/Getty Images

Social worker Lauren Rainbow (right) meets a man illegally camped in the woods in Snohomish County. A new program in the county helps people with addiction, instead of arresting them. Leah Nash for Finding Fixes podcast hide caption

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Leah Nash for Finding Fixes podcast

A Rural Community Decided To Treat Its Opioid Problem Like A Natural Disaster

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Gracia Lam for NPR

5 Ways To Make Classrooms More Inclusive

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Jonny Sun emerges from behind his social character and navigates his space within the illustration world. Christopher Sun /Courtesy of Kovert Creative hide caption

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Christopher Sun /Courtesy of Kovert Creative

A drug specialist in the Mexican army shows crystal methamphetamine paste seized at a clandestine laboratory in Mexico's Baja California in August. Much of the meth sold in the U.S. today comes from Mexico, according to DEA officials. GUILLERMO ARIAS/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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GUILLERMO ARIAS/AFP/Getty Images

Methamphetamine Roils Rural Towns Again Across The U.S.

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The cerebellum, a brain structure humans share with fish and lizards, appears to control the quality of many functions in the brain, according to a team of researchers. Science Source hide caption

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Science Source

The Underestimated Cerebellum Gains New Respect From Brain Scientists

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Among at least some rural Americans, pragmatism may now be superseding traditional disdain for government and the prizing of rugged individualism. Angela Hsieh/NPR hide caption

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Angela Hsieh/NPR

Rural Americans Are OK With 'Outside' Help To Beat Opioid Crisis And Boost Economy

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Paramedic Larrecsa Cox (center) and her quick-response team, including police Officer Stephanie Coffey (left) and Pastor Virgil Johnson (right), check in at the home in Huntington, W.Va., of someone who was revived a few days before from an overdose. Sarah McCammon/NPR hide caption

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Sarah McCammon/NPR

Knocking On Doors To Get Opioid Overdose Survivors Into Treatment

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