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Mental health advocates say 988, a simple three-digit number, will be easier for people to remember in the midst of a mental health emergency. T2 Images/Getty Images/Cultura RF hide caption

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T2 Images/Getty Images/Cultura RF

New Law Creates 988 Hotline For Mental Health Emergencies

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When the pandemic first hit, corporate executives thought video meetings were awesome and productive. Now, CEOs are questioning how much those meetings really achieve. Alistair Berg/Getty Images hide caption

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Clare Schneider/NPR

Advice For Dealing With Uncertainty — From People Who've Been There

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Family members Armin Prude (left) and Joe Prude stand with a picture of Daniel Prude in Rochester, N.Y., Thursday, Sept. 3, 2020. While suffering a mental health crisis, Prude, 41, suffocated after police in Rochester put a "spit hood" over his head while being taken into custody. He died March 30 after he was taken off life support, seven days after the encounter with police. Ted Shaffrey/AP hide caption

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Ted Shaffrey/AP

Rochester Hospital Released Daniel Prude Hours Before Fatal Encounter With Police

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Each mobile clinic has a nurse, a counselor and a peer specialist — all trained to drive a 34-foot-long motor home. "I never thought when I went to nursing school that I'd be doing this," says Christi Couron as she pumps 52 gallons of diesel fuel into the vehicle. Markian Hawryluk/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Markian Hawryluk/Kaiser Health News

African Americans and other underrepresented minorities make up only about 5% of the people in genetics research studies. janiecbros/Getty Images hide caption

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Neuroscience Has A Whiteness Problem. This Research Project Aims To Fix It

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Dao Thi Hoa, right, chairwoman of the Intergenerational Self Help Club in the Khuong Din ward of Hanoi in Vietnam, checks the club's account book with other members. Nguyễn Văn Hốt hide caption

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Nguyễn Văn Hốt

In her new book, Modern Madness: An Owner's Manual, Terri Cheney, who lives with bipolar disorder, shares advice for dealing with anxiety and depression and helping loved ones through a crisis. Neha Gupta/Getty Images hide caption

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Neha Gupta/Getty Images

Demonstrators march through the streets of Rochester, N.Y., earlier this month protesting the death of Daniel Prude, apparently stopped breathing as police were restraining him in March. Adrian Kraus/AP hide caption

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Adrian Kraus/AP

Mental Health And Police Violence: How Crisis Intervention Teams Are Failing

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Scientists used light to control the firing of specific cells to artificially create a rhythm in the brain that acted like the drug ketamine enjoynz/Getty Images hide caption

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Scientists Say A Mind-Bending Rhythm In The Brain Can Act Like Ketamine

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Social psychologist Keith Payne says we have a bias toward comparing ourselves to people who have more than us, rather than those who have less Marcus Butt/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Marcus Butt/Getty Images/Ikon Images

A recent survey found 62% of people in the U.S. with anorexia experienced a worsening of symptoms after the pandemic hit. And nearly a third of Americans with binge-eating disorder, which is far more common, reported an increase in episodes. Boogich/Getty Images hide caption

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Eating Disorders Thrive In Anxious Times, And Pose A Lethal Threat

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The annual town meeting in North Andover, Mass., which dates back to 1646, was held outside on June 16 on a high school football field to help keep participants a safe distance from each other. Jim Davis/The Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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Malaka Gharib/ NPR

How To Care For Older People In The Pandemic (And A Printable Guide!)

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A walk through the streets of New York during the pandemic echoes the loneliness and isolation many Americans are feeling in their battle against a virus that has brought multiple traumas — with no end in sight. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Pandemic's Emotional Hammer Hits Hard

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Los Angeles County last fall unveiled one of its 10 Department of Mental Health vans aimed at, among other things, reducing long waiting periods for the transport of individuals experiencing a mental health crisis. Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

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Damian Dovarganes/AP

California Poised To Strengthen Mental Health Insurance Laws

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Despite the challenges, distance learning can work well for some students with ADHD, researchers say. Some of those who aren't around peers are finding it easier to focus. Imgorthand/Getty Images hide caption

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Remote Learning's Distractions Put Extra Pressure On Students With ADHD

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A COVID-19 patient in the intensive care unit at United Memorial Medical Center in Houston on July 28. Go Nakamura/Getty Images hide caption

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Dr. Dinora Chinchilla is finally taking a month off after working seven consecutive months. Courtesy of Nicole Cataldi hide caption

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Courtesy of Nicole Cataldi

As Pandemic Persists, Health Care Heroes Beginning To Crack Under The Strain

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