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Mental Health

The pandemic and its economic fallout have made it harder for those who experience domestic violence to escape their abuser, say crisis teams, but the National Domestic Violence Hotline is one place to get quick help. Text LOVEIS to 1-866-331-9474 if speaking by phone feels too risky. Roos Koole/Getty Images hide caption

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Roos Koole/Getty Images

Domestic Abuse Can Escalate In Pandemic And Continue Even If You Get Away

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Rosalind Pichardo advertises a daily food giveaway service in the heart of Philadelphia's Kensington neighborhood, where more people die of opioid overdoses than any other area in the city. Nina Feldman/ WHYY hide caption

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Nina Feldman/ WHYY

For Opioid Users, Pandemic Means New Dangers, But Also New Treatment Options

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Breathing slowly and deeply through the nose is associated with a relaxation response, says James Nestor, author of Breath. As the diaphragm lowers, you're allowing more air into your lungs and your body switches to a more relaxed state. Sebastian Laulitzki/ Science Photo Library hide caption

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Sebastian Laulitzki/ Science Photo Library

How The 'Lost Art' Of Breathing Can Impact Sleep And Resilience

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Denise and Richard Victor of Bloomfield Hills, Mich., have been missing their grandkids, whom they haven't seen since February. Before the pandemic, they had regular visits with grandsons (from left) Daren Cosola, Stirling Victor, Davis Victor and Lucas Cosola. Courtesy of the Victor family hide caption

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Courtesy of the Victor family

Justice Buress, 4, hides under a table while demonstrating a drill at Little Explorers Learning Center in St. Louis. Tess Trice, head of the day care program, carries out monthly drills to train the children to get on the floor when they hear gunfire. Carolina Hidalgo/St. Louis Public Radio hide caption

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Carolina Hidalgo/St. Louis Public Radio

Teaching Kids To Hide From Gunfire: Safety Drills At Day Care And At Home

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Feda Almaliti with her son, 15-year-old Muhammed, who has severe autism. "Muhammed is an energetic, loving boy who doesn't understand what's going on right now," she says. Feda Almaliti hide caption

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Feda Almaliti

'He's Incredibly Confused': Parenting A Child With Autism During The Pandemic

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Anxious? Meditation Can Help You 'Relax Into The Uncertainty' Of The Pandemic

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Casa de Salud clinicians, staff and health apprentices socially distance outside their New Mexico clinic. The facility is one of many social safety net clinics that haven't yet received pandemic-related funding and are now on the brink financially. Elizabeth Boyce/Casa de Salud hide caption

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Elizabeth Boyce/Casa de Salud

The United Nations warned that the global pandemic presents particular dangers for people who struggle with mental health. Jewel Samad/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jewel Samad/AFP via Getty Images
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Grief For Beginners: 5 Things To Know About Processing Loss

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"The two most replicated, robust factors linked to suicide are economic change — downturn — and social disconnection," says Dr. Roger McIntyre, professor of psychiatry at the University of Toronto. And both factors, he notes, are major hallmarks of the COVID-19 pandemic. Fanatic Studio/Gary Waters/Getty Images hide caption

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Fanatic Studio/Gary Waters/Getty Images

Act Now To Get Ahead Of A Mental Health Crisis, Specialists Advise U.S.

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Together: The Healing Power of Human Connection in a Sometimes Lonely World, by Dr. Vivek Murthy Harper Wave hide caption

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Harper Wave

In 'Together,' Former Surgeon General Writes About Importance Of Human Connection

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"If we can erase some of the stigma around [depression and suicide]," says podcast host John Moe, "that person can have at least a better shot at treatment and avoiding this kind of fate." Malte Mueller/fStop/Getty Images hide caption

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Malte Mueller/fStop/Getty Images

Humorist Lightens Depression's Darkness By Talking (And Laughing) About It

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A spike in texts and calls to crisis hotlines reflects Americans' growing anxiety about the coronavirus and its impact on their lives. Richard Bailey/Getty Images hide caption

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Richard Bailey/Getty Images

Flood Of Calls And Texts To Crisis Hotlines Reflects Americans' Rising Anxiety

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Clare Schneider/NPR

Advice For Dealing With Uncertainty, From People Who've Been There

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Plainfield Correctional Facility, an Indiana state prison southwest of Indianapolis, listed 89 cases of test-confirmed COVID-19 among inmates and four deaths from the illness, as of Thursday. Seth Tackett/WFIU/WTIU hide caption

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Seth Tackett/WFIU/WTIU

Crowded Prisons Are Festering 'Petri Dishes' For Coronavirus, Observers Warn

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