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Mental Health

Chris Nickels for NPR

How The Brain Shapes Pain And Links Ouch With Emotion

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Buprenorphine, better known by the brand name Suboxone, helps people with opioid addiction stay in recovery. But it is prescribed far more often to white drug users than to blacks. Craig F. Walker/Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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Craig F. Walker/Boston Globe via Getty Images

Opioid Addiction Drug Going Mostly To Whites, Even As Black Death Rate Rises

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A growing body of research suggests psychedelic mushrooms may have therapeutic benefits for certain conditions. Now a movement seeks to decriminalize them. farmer images/Getty Images hide caption

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farmer images/Getty Images

A Growing Push To Loosen Laws Around Psilocybin, Treat Mushrooms As Medicine

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Beating Burnout: Sisters Write Book To Help Women Overcome Stress Cycle

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Cornelia Li for NPR

From Gloom To Gratitude: 8 Skills To Cultivate Joy

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Phil Gutis with his dog, Abe, who died last year. Gutis, who has Alzheimer's, hoped an experimental drug could help preserve his memories. Courtesy of Timothy Weaver hide caption

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Courtesy of Timothy Weaver

After A Big Failure, Scientists And Patients Hunt For A New Type Of Alzheimer's Drug

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Psychiatry's shift toward seeing mental health problems as an illness to be treated with a pill hasn't always served patients well, says Harvard historian and author Anne Harrington. James Wardell/Radius Images/Getty Images hide caption

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James Wardell/Radius Images/Getty Images

How Drug Companies Helped Shape A Shifting, Biological View Of Mental Illness

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Kim has been living at the Epiphany Center, a treatment facility in San Francisco for women struggling with addiction, for the past six months. She says her teddy bear is her only material possession left from her past: "Because everything I had, I've lost over and over again." April Dembosky/KQED hide caption

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April Dembosky/KQED

As Meth Use Surges, First Responders Struggle To Help Those In Crisis

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Katherine Langford arrives at a 13 Reasons Why event in June 2018 in Los Angeles. Langford plays a young woman who took her own life. Willy Sanjuan/Invision/AP hide caption

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Willy Sanjuan/Invision/AP

'Mind Fixers' Documents The 'Troubled Search' For Mental Illness Medication

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In Massachusetts last July, several Franklin County Jail inmates were watched by a nurse and a corrections officer after receiving their daily doses of buprenorphine, a drug that helps control opioid cravings. By some estimates, at least half to two-thirds of today's U.S. jail population has a substance use or dependence problem. Elise Amendola/AP hide caption

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Elise Amendola/AP

County Jails Struggle With A New Role As America's Prime Centers For Opioid Detox

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