Mental Health NPR covers mental health, happiness, depression, and treatment options. Subscribe to the RSS feed.

Physical therapy as well as cognitive therapy are part of a promising approach to managing chronic pain without drugs. Hero Images/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Hero Images/Getty Images

Mowing the lawn can be good exercise, and is fun for some people. But others who find themselves squeezed for time might find the luxury of paying someone else to do it to be of much more value than buying more stuff. Kristen Solecki for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Kristen Solecki for NPR

Need A Happiness Boost? Spend Your Money To Buy Time, Not More Stuff

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/545839192/546668946" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

After surgeons removed a tumor from Dan Fabbio's brain, they gave him his saxophone — to see whether he'd retained his ability to play. A year after his surgery, Fabbio is back to work full time as a music teacher. YouTube/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

toggle caption
YouTube/Screenshot by NPR

This Music Teacher Played His Saxophone While In Brain Surgery

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/545710598/546186348" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A U.S. Marine from the 1st Battalion, 8th Marines, Alpha Company looks out as an evening storm gathers above an outpost near Kunjak, in southern Afghanistan's Helmand province. Finbarr O'Reilly/Reuters/Viking hide caption

toggle caption
Finbarr O'Reilly/Reuters/Viking

A Retired Marine And A Photojournalist Confront War's 'Invisible Injuries'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/545705213/545875405" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Some YouTube stars seek counseling and take breaks from online life to deal with symptoms of anxiety. Eva Bee/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Eva Bee/Ikon Images/Getty Images

YouTube Stars Stress Out, Just Like The Rest Of Us

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/545552788/545739278" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Across the state of Maine, the number of prescriptions for painkillers is dropping. But some patients who have chronic pain say they need high doses of the medication to be able to function. Fanatic Studio/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Fanatic Studio/Getty Images

Intent On Reversing Its Opioid Epidemic, A State Limits Prescriptions

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/543955887/545469064" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Hospital emergency departments are tasked with saving the lives of people who overdose on opioids. Clinicians and researchers hope that more can be done during the hospital encounter to connect people with treatment. FangXiaNuo/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
FangXiaNuo/Getty Images

A growing number of food videos aim to trigger ASMR — Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response, or pleasing sensations in the brains of some viewers — by focusing on sounds like chopping and stirring. Christina Lee for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Christina Lee for NPR

Dillon Katz, at home in Delray Beach, Fla., says recovering drug users in his group counseling meetings frequently used to offer to help him get into a new treatment facility. He suspects now they were recruiters — so-called "body brokers" — who were receiving illegal kickbacks from the corrupt facility. Peter Haden/WLRN hide caption

toggle caption
Peter Haden/WLRN

'Body Brokers' Get Kickbacks To Lure People With Addictions To Bad Rehab

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/542630442/543730327" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In her book The Virginia State Colony For Epileptics And Feebleminded, poet Molly McCully Brown explores themes of disability, eugenics and faith. Kristin Teston/Persea hide caption

toggle caption
Kristin Teston/Persea

Poet Imagines Life Inside A 1910 Institution That Eugenics Built

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/543362834/543447215" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A vaccine against heroin wouldn't be like the measles vaccine that you receive once for a lifetime of immunity, say scientists working on it. Multiple shots per year would likely be required, and it would be specific to just heroin and morphine. kimberrywood/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
kimberrywood/Getty Images

A 'Vaccine For Addiction' Is No Simple Fix

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/542605039/542867110" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A recent study in Delray Beach identified at least six sober homes on this street alone. Greg Allen /NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Greg Allen /NPR

Beach Town Tries To Reverse Runaway Growth Of 'Sober Homes'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/537882989/542569880" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript