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A visitor to the Harvard School of Public Health's mock safe injection setup checks out the items on the demonstration table set up underneath a tent on the quad near the medical school in Boston on April 30, 2018. Jessica Rinaldi/Getty Images hide caption

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Jessica Rinaldi/Getty Images

Justice Department Promises Crackdown On Supervised Injection Facilities

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Courtesy of G. P. Putnam's Sons

'Gross Anatomy' Turns Humor On Taboos About The Female Body

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Some research suggests that having multiples increases a parent's risk of mental health concerns — like depression and anxiety — before and after the children are born. Don't be afraid to admit it, parents advise. Emotional support can help. Terry Vine/Getty Images hide caption

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Terry Vine/Getty Images

These PET scans show the normal distribution of opioid receptors in the human brain. A new study suggests ketamine may activate these receptors, raising concern it could be addictive. Philippe Psaila/Science Source hide caption

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Philippe Psaila/Science Source
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Panel: Doctors Should Focus On Preventing Depression In Pregnant Women, New Moms

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Previous research has shown that babies in the first year of life understand that certain individuals tend to win in social conflicts — such as individuals that are physically larger, or that come from larger social groups. Rick Lowe/Getty Images hide caption

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Rick Lowe/Getty Images

Toddlers Like Winners, But How They Win Matters

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A researcher showed people a picture of The Thinker in an effort to study the link between analytical thinking and religious disbelief. In hindsight, the researcher called his study design "silly". The study could not be reproduced. Peter Barritt/Getty Images hide caption

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In Psychology And Other Social Sciences, Many Studies Fail The Reproducibility Test

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"We would not be able to foster without Medicaid," says Sherri Croom of Tallahassee, Fla. Croom and her husband, Thomas, have fostered 27 children in the past decade. They're pictured here with four adopted children, two 18-year-old former foster daughters and those daughters' sons. Courtesy of the Croom family hide caption

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Courtesy of the Croom family

Vacation days piling up? Even a short trip can boost well-being. Kristen Uroda for NPR hide caption

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Kristen Uroda for NPR

Vacation Days Piling Up? Here's How To Get The Most Out Of A Short Vacation

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New Study Sheds Light On Depression In Teens And Parents

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When a teen's symptoms of depression improve as a result of treatment, it's more likely that their parent's mood lifts, too, new research shows. Roy Scott/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Roy Scott/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Treating Teen Depression Might Improve Mental Health Of Parents, Too

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Bea and Doug Duncan outside their home in Natick, Mass. The coaching they got from the Community Reinforcement and Family Training program, they say, gave them tools to help their son Jeff stick to his recovery from drug use. He's 28 now and has been sober for nine years. Robin Lubbbock/WBUR hide caption

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Robin Lubbbock/WBUR

About a decade ago, the FDA started requiring drugmakers to add black box warnings to labels and prescribing information for Seroquel and other antipsychotic drugs. The agency made the change after the medications were linked to an increased risk of death among elderly dementia patients. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

'Dear Doctor' Letters Use Peer Pressure, Government Warning To Stop Overprescribing

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According to one recent study, people who checked social media the most frequently had almost three times the risk of depression. Frederic Cirou/Getty Images/PhotoAlto hide caption

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Frederic Cirou/Getty Images/PhotoAlto

#Blessed: Is Everyone Happier Than You On Social Media?

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