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Faced with a rat trapped in a restrainer, a free rat opens the trap's door to liberate the trapped animal (while stepping on its head — "very rat-ish behavior," says University of Chicago neurobiologist Peggy Mason). David Christopher/University of Chicago hide caption

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David Christopher/University of Chicago

To Come To The Rescue Or Not? Rats, Like People, Take Cues From Bystanders

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Communication skills used to negotiate safe sex are also useful for setting boundaries while socializing during the COVID-19 pandemic. Above, circles drawn in the grass encourage social distancing at Dolores Park in San Francisco. Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images

This light micrograph from the brain of someone who died with Alzheimer's disease shows the plaques and neurofibrillary tangles that are typical of the disease. A glitch that prevents healthy cell structures from transitioning from one phase to the next might contribute to the tangles, researchers say. Jose Luis Calvo/ Science Source hide caption

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Jose Luis Calvo/ Science Source

In 2009, Australia's deadliest bushfires on record destroyed Kinglake, a town just over an hour's drive northeast of Melbourne. The disaster had long-term effects on families. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Peet Sapsin directs clients inside custom built "Gainz Pods", during his HIIT class, (high intensity interval training), at Sapsins Inspire South Bay Fitness, Redondo Beach, California, Wednesday, June 17, 2020. Jay L. Clendenin/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Jay L. Clendenin/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Recent protests in Philadelphia and across the country have drawn young people. But for most of the pandemic, youth have been quarantined and away from their social circles, which could make depression and other mental illness worse. Cory Clark/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Cory Clark/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Why Some Young People Fear Social Isolation More Than COVID-19

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Dr. Danielle Hairston, a psychiatry residency director at Howard University in Washington, D.C., trains and mentors young black doctors. Quraishia Ford hide caption

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Quraishia Ford

To Be Young, A Doctor And Black: Overcoming Racial Barriers In Medical Training

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Kai Koerber, a rising sophomore at the University of California, Berkeley, is a survivor of the 2018 mass shooting at Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla. Since then, he says, he's made promoting a mental health curriculum in high schools and colleges a personal priority. Brittany Hosea-Small hide caption

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Brittany Hosea-Small

'Bear Our Pain': The Plea For More Black Mental Health Workers

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How To Reduce Stress In Children Stuck At Home This Summer

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Author Susan Burton struggled with disordered eating for decades. "Hunger was something that I believed protected me and gave me power," she says. Anna Kurzaeva/Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Kurzaeva/Getty Images

From 'Empty' To 'Satisfied': Author Traces A Hunger That Food Can't Fix

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Dr. Julie Holland, author of the new book, Good Chemistry, says that when patients taking antidepressants have stopped experiencing relief, psychedelic drugs might be used in conjunction with talk therapy to help some work through past traumas. Milos Zivkovic/EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

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Milos Zivkovic/EyeEm/Getty Images

Psychiatrist Explores Possible Benefits Of Treating PTSD With Ecstasy Or Cannabis

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How To Help Black Children Cope Amid Stress Of Racial Protests

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Demonstrators on both sides of the abortion debate rally outside the U.S. Supreme Court on Jan. 19, 2018. Ricky Carioti/The Washington Post via Getty Im hide caption

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Ricky Carioti/The Washington Post via Getty Im

Study Examines The Lasting Effects Of Having — Or Being Denied — An Abortion

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