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The Taliban say the Red Cross may resume its work in Afghanistan, more than five months after threatening the group. In this photo from March, an orthopedic technician walks past artificial limbs in a workshop at the International Committee of the Red Cross hospital for war victims and the disabled in Kabul. Wakil Kohsar /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Wakil Kohsar /AFP/Getty Images

This image provided on Sunday by the U.S. government and DigitalGlobe and annotated by the source, shows a prestrike overview at Saudi Aramco's Khurais oil field in Buqayq, Saudi Arabia. U.S. government/Digital Globe via AP hide caption

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U.S. government/Digital Globe via AP

Former Vice President Joe Biden takes the stage Thursday at the third Democratic debate, which took place at Texas Southern University in Houston. Michael Zamora/NPR hide caption

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Michael Zamora/NPR

The port of Haifa in northern Israel. The United States is concerned about a deal for China's Shanghai International Port Group to build and control a shipping terminal in Haifa. Jack Guez/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jack Guez/AFP/Getty Images

There's A Growing Sore Spot In Israeli-U.S. Relations: China

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Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu announces his pledge Tuesday to annex the Jordan Valley in the West Bank if he wins reelection in next week's vote. Amir Levy/Getty Images hide caption

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Amir Levy/Getty Images

The newly appointed Saudi energy minister, Prince Abdulaziz bin Salman (left), meets with his father King Salman, in a handout picture provided by the Saudi Press Agency on Monday. Saudi Press Agency via AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saudi Press Agency via AFP/Getty Images

What Saudi Arabia's Energy Shake-Up Says About Its Oil Plans

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Many Afghans approve of President Trump's decision to quash a potential deal with the Taliban. Here, security forces guard a street in Kabul last week after a suicide car bombing rocked the capital's diplomatic enclave. Sayed Khodaberdi Sadat/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Sayed Khodaberdi Sadat/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

In Afghanistan, A Mix Of Surprise And Relief After Trump Cancels Taliban Talks

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Dr. Amir Khalil, a veterinarian with the animal rescue charity Four Paws International, carries a sedated coyote at a zoo in Rafah in the Gaza Strip, during the evacuation of animals in April. Said Khatib/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Said Khatib/AFP/Getty Images

A satellite image from Thursday shows smoke billowing from a launch pad at the Imam Khomeini Space Center in northern Iran. Planet Labs Inc. via Middlebury Institute of International Studies hide caption

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Planet Labs Inc. via Middlebury Institute of International Studies

First lady Rula Ghani at the Presidential Palace in Kabul, Afghanistan. Earlier this year, she helped free more than 190 Afghan women and girls imprisoned for failing the virginity test after reproductive rights activist Farhad Javid brought it to her attention in October. Kiana Hayeri/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Kiana Hayeri/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Cancer patients receive chemotherapy treatment at Roshana Cancer Center, a private clinic in western Tehran. Marjan Yazdi for NPR hide caption

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Marjan Yazdi for NPR

Iran Under Sanctions: A Scramble For Cancer Care And Blame To Go Around

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A Palestinian man uses a biometric gate as he crosses into Israel at the Qalandia crossing in Jerusalem in July. Israel's military has invested tens of millions of dollars to upgrade West Bank crossings and ease entry for Palestinian workers. But critics slam the military's use of facial recognition technology as problematic. Sebastian Scheiner/AP hide caption

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Sebastian Scheiner/AP

Face Recognition Lets Palestinians Cross Israeli Checkposts Fast, But Raises Concerns

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Locusts swarm over Yemen's capital. Mohammed Huwais /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mohammed Huwais /AFP/Getty Images

Maybe The Way To Control Locusts Is By Growing Crops They Don't Like

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