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Part of the Pardis petrochemical complex facilities in Assaluyeh, on the northern coast of the Persian Gulf, Iran. The United States has reimposed sanctions targeting Iran's economy. Iranian Presidency Office via AP hide caption

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Iranian Presidency Office via AP

Turkey's President Tayyip Erdogan says audio recordings of Jamal Khashoggi's murder have been released to the U.S. Khashoggi was a journalist and critic of Saudi Arabia's government. Burhan Ozbilici/AP hide caption

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Burhan Ozbilici/AP

Raqqa's first responders use a digger to push through the rubble of a building likely destroyed in an airstrike carried out by the U.S.-led coalition against ISIS. Ruth Sherlock/NPR hide caption

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Ruth Sherlock/NPR

A friend attends to the body of a Yemeni fighter on Sept. 22. Andrew Renneisen/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Renneisen/Getty Images

Plagued By War and Famine, Yemen Is 'No Longer A Functioning State,' Journalist Warns

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Rick Harrison (from left) was a firefighter and machinist on the USS Cole, and David Morales was a boatswain's mate. Lorrie Triplett, Jamal Gunn and David Francis all lost family members who worked aboard the Cole. William Conlon/NPR hide caption

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William Conlon/NPR

In Mosul, reminders of the Islamic State's brutal rule include a school wall covered with drawings showing how militants executed their prisoners. The U.N. says the area around the city holds mass graves where thousands of people were buried. Ari Jalal/Reuters hide caption

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Ari Jalal/Reuters

Children sit in front of a tub of moldy bread in their shelter in Aslam, Hajjah, Yemen, last month. The U.N. has estimated that up to 14 million Yemenis — about half the country's population — will suffer severe food shortages in the next few months. Hani Mohammed/AP hide caption

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Hani Mohammed/AP

Major Brent Taylor Utah National Guard hide caption

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Utah National Guard

A Utah Town Remembers Its Mayor, Killed In Action In Afghanistan

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Assyrian artifacts are displayed at Iraq's National Museum in Baghdad in 2016. The $30 million sale of a 3,000-year-old Assyrian relief is sparking concern that similar artifacts will be looted. Ahmad Al-Rubaye/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ahmad Al-Rubaye/AFP/Getty Images

An exchange shop displays rates for various currencies in downtown Tehran last month. Iran is bracing for the restoration of U.S. sanctions on its vital oil industry set to take effect on Monday, as it grapples with an economic crisis that has sparked sporadic protests over rising prices, corruption and unemployment. Vahid Salemi/AP hide caption

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Vahid Salemi/AP

Reimposing Sanctions Will Hasten End Of Iran Nuclear Deal, Some Experts Warn

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An Iranian woman walks past the former U.S. Embassy in Tehran, which bears a mural depicting the Statue of Liberty with a dead face. With just days to go until the U.S. plans to snap more sanctions back into place, questions linger about what the move spells for the world. Aatta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Aatta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images

Jamal Khashoggi's fiancee and others will speak about his life and legacy on Friday, one month after he was killed in Saudi Arabia's consulate in Istanbul. Here, a protester holds a placard showing solidarity for Khashoggi during a demonstration outside the Saudi Arabian Embassy in London last week. Jack Taylor/Getty Images hide caption

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Jack Taylor/Getty Images

A Yemeni man walks through the rubble of a building after a Saudi-led coalition airstrike last month in the capital, Sanaa. "The time is now for the cessation of hostilities," U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said Tuesday. Mohammed Huwais/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mohammed Huwais/AFP/Getty Images

Palestinian prosthetics technicians in Gaza prepare leg stump casts in the first step of building a prosthetic leg socket for young Palestinian amputees who lost a leg after being shot by Israeli troops during protests at the Gaza-Israel border. Daniel Estrin/NPR hide caption

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Daniel Estrin/NPR

Inside Gaza's Factory Making Prosthetic Legs For Palestinian Protest Amputees

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Supporters of Tehreek-e-Labaik Pakistan (TLP), a hard-line religious political party, chant slogans during a protest on Wednesday against the court decision to overturn the conviction of Asia Bibi. Arif Ali/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Arif Ali/AFP/Getty Images

A member of the Syrian Democratic Forces, backed by U.S. special forces, talks on the radio near Raqqa's stadium as they clear the last positions on the front line on Oct. 16, 2017. The city was an important Islamic State group stronghold. Bulent Kilic/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Bulent Kilic/AFP/Getty Images

'This Is Not Liberation': Life In The Rubble Of Raqqa, Syria

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Hana naps under a mosquito net in her tent in an informal settlement for Syrian refugees in Lebanon, where she lives with her family. She had spent a long morning picking cucumbers with other refugees in the Bekaa Valley. August 2015 Lynsey Addario hide caption

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Lynsey Addario

Powerful Photos Of Love And War By Lynsey Addario

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Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman said Saudi Arabia is cooperating with Turkey to investigate the Jamal Khashoggi killing, "to present the perpetrators to the court." Bandar Algaloud//Courtesy of Saudi Royal Court / Reuters hide caption

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Bandar Algaloud//Courtesy of Saudi Royal Court / Reuters

Saudi Crown Prince Calls Khashoggi Killing 'A Heinous Crime'

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