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Rulers in the United Arab Emirates announced Saturday that they unanimously appointed Sheikh Mohammed bin Zayed Al Nahyan as the president of this hereditarily ruled nation on the Arabian Peninsula. Burhan Ozbilici/AP hide caption

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Burhan Ozbilici/AP

Israeli police in riot gear confront mourners and the journalists on Friday covering the transfer from the hospital of slain Al Jazeera veteran journalist Shireen Abu Akleh to her final resting place in east Jerusalem. Abu Akleh, a Palestinian-American reporter, was shot dead Wednesday during an Israeli military raid in the West Bank town of Jenin. Mahmoud Illean/AP hide caption

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Mahmoud Illean/AP

Women watch an Al Jazeera obituary report on TV at the family home of Al Jazeera journalist Shireen Abu Akleh in the Palestinian neighborhood of Beit Hanina in Israeli-occupied east Jerusalem on Wednesday, after she was killed as she covered an Israeli army raid on Jenin refugee camp in the occupied West Bank. Ahmad Gharabli/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ahmad Gharabli/AFP via Getty Images

Al Jazeera's Shireen Abu Akleh is killed while reporting on an Israeli raid

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Ukrainian refugee Alina Archipova gives her daughter medication at a temporary shelter in Berlin, Germany, on March 10. Carsten Koall/Getty Images hide caption

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Gilberto Tadday/Gilberto Tadday / TED

Shabana Basij-Rasikh: The ongoing fight to educate Afghan girls

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A child receives a polio vaccine in Kampala, Uganda, on Jan. 14, 2022. Nicholas Kajoba/Xinhua News Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kajoba/Xinhua News Agency via Getty Images

Vaccine-derived polio is on the rise. A new vaccine aims to stop the spread

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Archeologists work in the ruins of a temple for Zeus-Kasios, the ancient Greek god, at the Tell el-Farma archaeological site in the northwestern corner of the Sinai Peninsula. Tell el-Farma, also known by its ancient name Pelusium, dates back to the late Pharaonic period and was also used during Greco-Roman and Byzantine times. Egyptian Tourism and Antiquities Ministry via AP hide caption

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Egyptian Tourism and Antiquities Ministry via AP

Masks are just one protective measure for these airline passengers arriving in Shanghai from Paris. Hector Retamal /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Hector Retamal /AFP via Getty Images

Two farmers take a break from sowing their field with oat, east of Kyiv on April 16. GENYA SAVILOV/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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GENYA SAVILOV/AFP via Getty Images

It's planting season in Ukraine, and that means problems for global food supply

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Volunteers unload food aid in Chena, Ethiopia, one of many parts of the world where conflict has fueled hunger. Jemal Countess/Getty Images hide caption

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Jemal Countess/Getty Images

Ukraine crisis raises question: Does food aid go equally to 'Black and white lives'?

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Israeli army soldiers guard a section of Israel's separation barrier last year in the West Bank village of Nilin, west of Ramallah. Two Palestinian men were critically injured by Israeli forces in the occupied West Bank on Monday, the Palestinian Health Ministry said, the latest incident in a wave of Israeli-Palestinian violence during the Muslim holy month of Ramadan. Nasser Nasser/AP hide caption

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Nasser Nasser/AP

Girls walk upstairs as they enter a school before class in Kabul, Afghanistan on Sept. 12, 2021. Since then, the Taliban has decided against opening educational institutions to girls beyond grade six. Felipe Dana/AP hide caption

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Felipe Dana/AP

Eight Months Later, A Look At The Taliban's Broken Promises

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