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Avril Haines, the new director of national intelligence, released a declassified report Friday that says Saudi Arabia's crown prince was responsible for a 2018 killing of a prominent journalist. Haines spoke to NPR in her first interview since taking office last month. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Avril Haines Takes Over As Intelligence Chief At 'A Challenging Time'

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Lawmakers and journalists are among those calling for penalties against Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman for the 2018 killing of Washington Post columnist Jamal Khashoggi after a U.S. intelligence report finding the crown prince had approved the operation. Emrah Gurel/AP hide caption

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Emrah Gurel/AP

People hold posters of slain Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi, near Saudi Arabia's consulate in Istanbul in the fall, marking the two-year anniversary of his death. Emrah Gurel/AP hide caption

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Emrah Gurel/AP

U.S. Intelligence: Saudi Crown Prince Approved Operation To Kill Jamal Khashoggi

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Presiding judge Anne Kerber (left) stands before handing the verdict to Syrian defendant Eyad al-Gharib (right, face hidden under a folder) Wednesday in Koblenz. Gharib, 44, a former Syrian intelligence service agent, was sentenced to 4 1/2 years in jail for complicity in crimes against humanity in the first court case over state-sponsored torture by the Syrian government. Thomas Lohnes/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Thomas Lohnes/AFP via Getty Images

Sheikh Ahmed Zaki Yamani, Saudi Arabia's then-oil minister on Dec. 1, 1973, in London during talks on the oil crisis. Roger Jackson/Central Press/Getty Images hide caption

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Roger Jackson/Central Press/Getty Images

Ahmed Zaki Yamani, Key To Making Saudi Arabia A World Oil Power, Dies At 90

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Visitors with the Bil Weekend tourism company take photographs inside the ruins of the ancient city of Babylon, in the area around the Ishtar gate. The animal on the walls ins a dragon-like creature associated with the Babylonian god Marduk. Alice Fordham for NPR hide caption

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Alice Fordham for NPR

'It Was Like Magic': Iraqis Visit Babylon And Other Heritage Sites For 1st Time

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Red Line: The Unraveling of Syria and America's Race to Destroy the Most Dangerous Arsenal in the World, by Joby Warrick Doubleday hide caption

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Doubleday

'Red Line' Examines Syria's Use Of Chemical Weapons, And The World's Discovery Of It

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An Iraqi policeman walks by a mural depicting Pope Francis on the outer walls of Our Lady of Salvation Church in Baghdad on Monday. Pope Francis' visit from March 5 to 8 will include trips to Baghdad, the city of Mosul and a meeting with the country's top Shiite cleric Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani. Ahmad al-Rubaye/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ahmad al-Rubaye/AFP via Getty Images

Pope Plans Historic Visit To Iraq As Its Christian Populations Dwindle

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Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Rafael Mariano Grossi meets over the weekend with Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif. Fatemeh Bahrami/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Fatemeh Bahrami/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Friends and family members of slain prominent Lebanese activist and intellectual Lokman Slim (shown in the raised image), attend a memorial ceremony in the garden of the family residence in the capital Beirut's southern suburbs, a week after he was found dead in his car, on Feb. 11. Slim, 58, was an outspoken critic of Hezbollah. Joseph Eid/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Joseph Eid/AFP via Getty Images

Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, speaks with reporters in the James Brady Press Briefing Room at the White House last month. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Yemenis wave their national flag during a rally commemorating the anniversary of the 2011 Arab Spring uprising that toppled the then-President Ali Abdullah Saleh, on Feb. 11, 2016, in the southern city of Taez. This year the Middle Eastern country marks the 10th anniversary of the uprising. Ahmad al-Basha/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ahmad al-Basha/AFP via Getty Images

A vial of the AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine. A small study in South Africa has raised concerns about its effectiveness, but the World Health Organization has now stated: "Even if there is a possibility that this vaccine has a reduction in efficacy, we see no reason not to use it, even in countries with variants." Nikolay Doychinov/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Nikolay Doychinov/AFP via Getty Images

Saudi women's rights activist Loujain al-Hathloul is best known for leading the campaign to legalize driving for women in Saudi Arabia. She was detained in May of 2018 just weeks before the Saudi government lifted the ban. Marieke Wijntjes via Reuters hide caption

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Marieke Wijntjes via Reuters

Workers search through debris at a warehouse, after it was reportedly hit in an airstrike by the Saudi-led coalition, in the Yemeni capital Sanaa on July 2, 2020. More than 233,000 people have died as a result of the war. Mohammed Huwais/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mohammed Huwais/AFP via Getty Images

Critic Of U.S. Role In Yemen Responds To Biden's Plans To Pull Back

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