Podcast: Economics For Monkeys : Planet Money On today's Planet Money: human beings aren't the only creatures who make economic decisions. It turns out that monkeys do it, too.
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Podcast: Economics For Monkeys

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Podcast: Economics For Monkeys

Podcast: Economics For Monkeys

If there are fewer food providers among vervet monkeys, each provider gets more grooming. wwarby/Flickr Creative Commons hide caption

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wwarby/Flickr Creative Commons

Podcast: Economics For Monkeys

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/114011851/127423825" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

On today's Planet Money:

Human beings aren't the only creatures who make economic decisions. It turns out that monkeys do it, too. Scientists have observed our primate kin exchanging goods and services and adjusting prices.

Ronald Noe, a professor of primate ethology at the University of Strasbourg, says the vervet monkey of southern and eastern Africa uses grooming as a kind of currency. They determine the value of food providers and divide their attention according to the law of supply and demand.

Bonus: After the jump, God bless the Columbia Gorge.

Download the podcast; or subscribe. Intro music: The Rolling Stone's "Monkey Man." Find us: Twitter/ Facebook/ Flickr.

Josh Harrison sends this photo and writes:

The Columbia Gorge is a beautiful area with an awe-inspiring river, gnarly windsurfing, easy rolling hills, waterfalls galore, and just to make sure you have fun -- dozens of wineries on both the Washington and Oregon sides of the river. But as you can see in this photo, it looks like the recession has hit hard here, too.

For lease in Oregon. Gregory Schiedeler hide caption

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Gregory Schiedeler

In September, unemployment hit 11.5 percent in Oregon, above the national average of 9.8 percent. In Washington, it hit 9.3 percent. The Pacific led the Bureau of Labor Statistics' nine geographic divisions, with 11.6 percent unemployment.