Adam Smith And The Not So Invisble Hand : Planet Money Remembering renown economist Paul Samuelson with the help of another Nobel Laureate, Amartya Sen.
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Adam Smith And The Not So Invisble Hand

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Adam Smith And The Not So Invisble Hand

Adam Smith And The Not So Invisble Hand

Scottish philosopher Adam Smith. North Wind Picture Archives via AP Images hide caption

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North Wind Picture Archives via AP Images

Adam Smith And The Not So Invisble Hand

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On today's Planet Money:

Adam Davidson and Alex Blumberg chat with Amartya Sen, a Nobel Prize Laureate in Economics, about his new book, The Idea of Justice, and its critique of the theory of social justice. Sen spends time in his book, and on the podcast, talking about what he sees as common misinterpretations of Adam Smith's oft-cited but perhaps more complex embrace of an absolute free market.

Download the podcast; or subscribe. Music: Kayne West's "Champion." Find us: Twitter/ Facebook/ Flickr.