House Prices In Your Home Town : Planet Money Nationwide, home prices have started to stabilize, but there's a lot of variation from city to city. Here are the numbers for 20 metro areas, and for the nation as a whole.
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House Prices In Your Home Town

More wishy-washy housing numbers today, courtesy of the Case-Shiller index.

Nationwide, home prices in January were a little bit lower than they were a year earlier. But they were a little bit higher than they were in December.

The year-over-year data show some pretty big disparities, even among cities that had big run-ups during the bubble. There were significant gains in San Francisco, Los Angeles and San Diego and big declines in Las Vegas, Tampa and Florida.

Here are the month-over-month and year-over-year numbers for 20 metro areas, and a composite number for the nation as a whole:

Metro AreaJan. 2010Monthly Change9Annual
Change
Atlanta108.53-0.49%-2.12%
Boston155.20.34%1.54%
Charlotte118.8-0.14%-3.08%
Chicago125.98-0.83%-4.27%
Cleveland104.60.69%0.30%
Dallas119.6-0.35%4.24%
Denver127.930.06%2.76%
Detroit72.160.08%-7.37%
Las Vegas104.30.29%-17.39%
Los Angeles174.011.84%3.85%
Miami147.56-0.09%-6.77%
Minneapolis123.330.71%1.92%
New York170.98-0.28%-5.35%
Phoenix112.570.75%-4.52%
Portland149.36-0.47%-4.19%
San Diego158.860.95%5.87%
San Francisco137.60.56%9.05%
Seattle147.35-0.65%-5.96%
Tampa138.770.46%-7.36%
Washington179.750.22%3.51%
Composite146.320.32%-0.69%

The key thing to look at here, of course, is the change over time. But just in case you're wondering what that first number for Jan. '10 actually means: For each metro area, 100 is equal to where home prices were in January, 2000. So if the number for January, 2010 is 150, it means that homes are 50% more expensive now than they were in January of 2000. The index isn't adjusted for inflation.

Bonus Home: Here's a post from last week on the Obama Administration's revised plan to prevent foreclosures.