Wine, Cigars, And The Plan To Fix The Dollar : Planet Money The world's biggest economies spend a summer plotting in secret, over French wine, to make the dollar worth much, much less.
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Wine, Cigars, And The Plan To Fix The Dollar

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Wine, Cigars, And The Plan To Fix The Dollar

Wine, Cigars, And The Plan To Fix The Dollar

Wine, Cigars, And The Plan To Fix The Dollar

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/131888017/131893468" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

James Baker announces the Plaza Accord on Sept. 22, 1985. David Mulford, the man at the center of today's show, is on the far right. MARIO CABRERA/AP hide caption

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MARIO CABRERA/AP

The world's biggest economies spend a summer plotting in secret, over French wine, to make the dollar worth much, much less.

You guessed it: The Plaza Accord!

On today's Planet Money, we tell the story of the 1985 deal — and reflect on what it says about today's currency wars, and about government efforts to set the value of money.

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