Episode 641: Why We Work So Much : Planet Money The world economy is more productive than ever before. A lot of people could work fewer hours and still meet their basic needs. But we don't. Why?
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Episode 641: Why We Work So Much

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Episode 641: Why We Work So Much

Episode 641: Why We Work So Much

Episode 641: Why We Work So Much

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/426017148/426029196" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Economist John Maynard Keynes published an optimistic essay in 1930 called "Economic Possibilities for Our Grandchildren." Keynes thought that by now we might be working just 15 hours a week.

Keynes never had kids. But we talked with two of his sister's grandchildren. Like most of us, they work more than 15 hours. What did Keynes get wrong?

Music: The Losers' "Ghost Wife" and White Arrows' "Can't Stop Now." Find us: Twitter/Facebook/ Spotify/ Tumblr.